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Re: [SCA-Archery] RE: Mary Rose

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  • James Koch
    Godwin, ... Roger that. I manufacture and sell a fencing hilt based on the Mary Rose sword. ... Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist) ... [Non-text portions of
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4, 2007
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      Godwin,
      >
      Roger that. I manufacture and sell a fencing hilt based on the Mary
      Rose sword.
      >
      Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
      >
      >
      >At 08:41 AM 9/4/2007, you wrote:

      >One of my favorite spots there Cain..... ;)
      >
      >Last time I was there, they only had 3 bows, sort of mounted on a wall,
      >that you could try to pull. The heaviest not being close to 85... more
      >like 55. Cool that they have a heavier bow there now.
      >
      >Most museums won't let you take pictures, but at the time I was there,
      >they let me take all I wanted... sans the flash.
      >
      >What a lot of people don't realize, is that it wasn't only archery
      >equipment that was brought up from the MR: plates, mugs, clothing,
      >devices, firearms.... etc, all were kept in great shape as the archery
      >tackle was, and is on display a well.
      >
      >I need to go back again... soon. :)
      >
      >Godwin
      >(lincoln green with envy ;)
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Colin MacNachtan
      ... I also made my way to the Mary Rose exhibit last Friday while I was in Drachenwald. It s an incredible place. I spent 3+ hours wandering through it and
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 9, 2007
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        On Tuesday 04 September 2007, THL Cain Saethydd wrote:
        > I am on an excursion in Drachenvald. Yes, got lots of Pics. Even
        > some from the Mary Rose. Found out Sir Robert Hardy is still alive,
        > so am going to try to contact him and setup for a hands on sometime
        > this next year. I was offered one several years ago, but could not
        > get over here.

        I also made my way to the Mary Rose exhibit last Friday while I was in
        Drachenwald. It's an incredible place. I spent 3+ hours wandering through
        it and watching the video, and another half hour looking at the actual ship.

        > By the way, notes on the bows and arrows of the Mary Rose.
        >
        > 1- Many of the war arrows were cut/planed with perpindicular grain,
        > but had in appearance similar grain patterns we find with common wood
        > shafts today. All of the arrows on display did show signs of
        > fletching.
        >
        > 2- Some of the war bows (yew) had sapwood backing, some did not.
        > Some were horizontaly aligned grain (normal way), while some were
        > biased (angle) and others were perpindicular grained. Sir Robert goes
        > into detail on this in his book 'Longbow', but still was nice to see
        > it. All of the bows on display did show signs horn nocks.

        As a fairly new archer (and not a bowyer) I lack the skill to make detailed
        analysis of the bows and arrows I saw. But I do have a few observations...

        What struck me most was the shape of the bows. They all had a dramatic taper
        to a fairly sharp point. Their shape made me think of a double-ended spear,
        though with a varying curve. I presume this makes for a faster release since
        the tips have so little mass.

        Conversely the center of most of the bows are almost circular and very thick.
        Many of them have a diameter of 2 inches or more.

        > They had a display yew war bow of considerable size, available for
        > anyone to test their mettle. The challenge was issued to draw it to
        > the ear. I did just that. I did not attempt a second draw, but did
        > not cry out in pain, either. This was on friday, I still feel my back
        > out of place today, Tuesday. However, for anyone who reads the study
        > on the bows of the Mary Rose, you will find that the average draw
        > weight was not even close to 180lbs, more like 80 to 100lbs. This bow
        > was approximately 85 by my estimate, but the great length of the
        > limbs could easily have thrown my estimate low by 20 lbs.

        The test bows were solidly clamped to a wall at their center, with a test
        arrow permanently nocked and extending through the wall. This arrow had a
        stop at what was problably 27-28 inches. They had a child's bow, a "lady's"
        bow at probably 40 pounds, and a full bow that I would estimate at 80-85
        pounds, though one of the staff assured me it measures 75.

        I drew the full bow to its stop probably half a dozen times. It was awkward
        being attached to the wall, plus its full draw is 1-2 inches less than what
        is comfortable for me. Today (two days later) I have a slightly sore
        shoulder from the effort.

        The staffer also said of the actual bows from the Mary Rose, they estimate a
        range of 80-160 pounds draw weight, though he did not give any indication of
        how many at each weight.

        Colin
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