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Archery Gear - A Do It Yourself A&S Guide

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  • jameswolfden
    With all the talk about what a newcomer needs to get started, I thought I might point out that almost all archery gear can be made yourself. Of course, some is
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 29, 2007
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      With all the talk about what a newcomer needs to get started, I thought I might point out
      that almost all archery gear can be made yourself. Of course, some is more complicated
      than others and a newbie is not likely to be making his/her own bow to start with but
      other gear makes a great entry point into the A&S part of archery.

      And, no, I have not done all these things but I'm working on many.

      Beginner's A&S gear

      Arrows - This is probably the starting (and, often, ending) point for most A&S archery
      projects. There are numerous DIY sites done up by SCA people here on the list. Since this
      is so common, you will probably find some fletcher in your local area that will show you
      the ropes and loan you some tools until you buy your own.

      Flemish Twist Sting - With or without a jig, this is simpler to do than make an arrow so I
      don't understand why more people don't make their own string. I learned off the web but
      nothing beats face to face mentoring. Learning to serve is harder in my mind but the
      experienced servers might want to put a word in how easy it really is.

      Continuous Loop String - On the surface, this is even easier than flemish twist but it
      requires three times as much serving and I hate to do serving.

      Bracer - Leatherworking and the SCA go together like fries and gravy (I'm Canadian, can
      you tell). The bracer is pretty simple leather project to get started on.

      Quiver - Want to look really sharp? Just stick the arrows in your belt and forgo the quiver.
      It looks very period and its cheap. Now, I wouldn't want to be Laochlain Silverwolf going
      into the speed round using this method but it still looks good. The next step up is a
      simple linen cloth bag quiver. And once you hone your leatherworking skills on your
      bracer, you might want to try a leather quiver.


      More advanced stuff

      Gloves - The three finger glove can be documented to period. It takes a bit more
      leatherworking skill than a bracer but it will be a little easier than doing a full glove.

      Arrows - If you haven't done horn inserts and self nocks, now is the time to try. Already
      way past that? Have you split some ash and planed out your shaft yet. Forged some
      arrowheads? Oh, you have done a bodkin? Then, its time to try weld-forging and making a
      Type 16 arrowhead.

      Longbow - Don't start in Yew right off the back. Both Ash and Elm were used in period and
      a stave cost about a quarter of the cost of yew. Much easier to work with than osage. I
      prefer elm myself. I got a seasoned elm stave and some windfall vine maple that I want to
      try and then, that yew is starting to look pretty tempting.

      Crossbow - Start off by buying a prod from somebody like Gladius or Siegfried and
      concentrate on building the tiller and the tickler. The notchlock style can be built in an
      afternoon and probably belongs in the beginner section. The rolling nut will take more
      time and skill. Maybe work up to building your own prods, wood, steel, and composite.

      Hornbow - Of course, it's difficult but not impossible. There are a growing numbers of
      bowyers tackling this. And, of course, if you make this bow, you are going to learn to
      shoot it the way it was meant to be shot even if you have to have the marshall clear the
      area for a 100 yards all around you for safety.


      The fun doesn't have to end when you leave the range.


      James Wolfden
    • Oakes, George
      Can we ask where you obtained your Elm Stave for your bows? I would like to make my own, and I was looking at Hickory, Oak, Ash, and Elm as the wood. I was
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 30, 2007
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        Can we ask where you obtained your Elm Stave for your bows? I would like
        to make my own, and I was looking at Hickory, Oak, Ash, and Elm as the
        wood. I was leaning toward Hickory as it seems a lot of the wood bows
        available online are made from Hickory.

        Also while my local hardwood shop does carry these kinds of wood, I am
        not sure what kind of cut to ask for? do I want Quarter Sawn boards or
        something else.

        I know that basicaly I want a stave that the grain all runs as straight
        as possible so that when the wood is flexed it wont break out if the
        grain is not straight.

        Thanks much

        ________________________________

        From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of jameswolfden
        Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 12:49 AM
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] Archery Gear - A Do It Yourself A&S Guide


        <CONTENT TRIMMED OUT>...

        Longbow - Don't start in Yew right off the back. Both Ash and Elm were
        used in period and
        a stave cost about a quarter of the cost of yew. Much easier to work
        with than osage. I
        prefer elm myself. I got a seasoned elm stave and some windfall vine
        maple that I want to
        try and then, that yew is starting to look pretty tempting.


        The fun doesn't have to end when you leave the range.

        James Wolfden
      • jameswolfden
        My staves came from a company in Canada called A&M Wood. http://www.amwoodinc.com/ You can find the staves in the pricelists area under Miscellaneous/archery
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 30, 2007
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          My staves came from a company in Canada called A&M Wood.

          http://www.amwoodinc.com/

          You can find the staves in the pricelists area under Miscellaneous/archery bows. I was
          pleased with the results but there was some small insect burrows I had to scrape past.
          Hickory should be a fine choice, too.

          Murray Gaskins, a bowyer of some reknown, also has a website where he sells staves (but
          doesn't list red elm). I have not dealt with him so I cannot make any recommendations.

          And, of course, there is ebay.

          If you can get quarter sawn wood with the bark still on, that should work great. If you want
          to go the board bow, try this article on paleoplanet by Tim Baker
          http://p081.ezboard.com/fpaleoplanet69529frm52.showMessage?topicID=2.topic

          Tim's article on building your first wooden bow is also at the paleoplanet site and on the
          files section of our group. If you do visit paleoplanet which I recommend, please take in
          mind that this is a primitive skills site. Fiberglass is not mentioned. There is a section for
          laminated bows but this is still intended for all wood composite bows.

          James

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Oakes, George" <goakes@...> wrote:
          >
          > Can we ask where you obtained your Elm Stave for your bows? I would like
          > to make my own, and I was looking at Hickory, Oak, Ash, and Elm as the
          > wood. I was leaning toward Hickory as it seems a lot of the wood bows
          > available online are made from Hickory.
        • RJ Bachner
          Try http://www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwarmbear/diy/diy.html the best DIY site going if you need basics. ;) Ragi ... From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 30, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Try http://www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwarmbear/diy/diy.html the best DIY site
            going if you need basics. ;)

            Ragi

            -----Original Message-----
            From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of jameswolfden
            Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 12:49 AM
            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SCA-Archery] Archery Gear - A Do It Yourself A&S Guide

            With all the talk about what a newcomer needs to get started, I thought I
            might point out
            that almost all archery gear can be made yourself. Of course, some is more
            complicated
            than others and a newbie is not likely to be making his/her own bow to start
            with but
            other gear makes a great entry point into the A&S part of archery.

            And, no, I have not done all these things but I'm working on many.

            Beginner's A&S gear

            Arrows - This is probably the starting (and, often, ending) point for most
            A&S archery
            projects. There are numerous DIY sites done up by SCA people here on the
            list. Since this
            is so common, you will probably find some fletcher in your local area that
            will show you
            the ropes and loan you some tools until you buy your own.

            Flemish Twist Sting - With or without a jig, this is simpler to do than make
            an arrow so I
            don't understand why more people don't make their own string. I learned off
            the web but
            nothing beats face to face mentoring. Learning to serve is harder in my mind
            but the
            experienced servers might want to put a word in how easy it really is.

            Continuous Loop String - On the surface, this is even easier than flemish
            twist but it
            requires three times as much serving and I hate to do serving.

            Bracer - Leatherworking and the SCA go together like fries and gravy (I'm
            Canadian, can
            you tell). The bracer is pretty simple leather project to get started on.

            Quiver - Want to look really sharp? Just stick the arrows in your belt and
            forgo the quiver.
            It looks very period and its cheap. Now, I wouldn't want to be Laochlain
            Silverwolf going
            into the speed round using this method but it still looks good. The next
            step up is a
            simple linen cloth bag quiver. And once you hone your leatherworking skills
            on your
            bracer, you might want to try a leather quiver.


            More advanced stuff

            Gloves - The three finger glove can be documented to period. It takes a bit
            more
            leatherworking skill than a bracer but it will be a little easier than doing
            a full glove.

            Arrows - If you haven't done horn inserts and self nocks, now is the time to
            try. Already
            way past that? Have you split some ash and planed out your shaft yet. Forged
            some
            arrowheads? Oh, you have done a bodkin? Then, its time to try weld-forging
            and making a
            Type 16 arrowhead.

            Longbow - Don't start in Yew right off the back. Both Ash and Elm were used
            in period and
            a stave cost about a quarter of the cost of yew. Much easier to work with
            than osage. I
            prefer elm myself. I got a seasoned elm stave and some windfall vine maple
            that I want to
            try and then, that yew is starting to look pretty tempting.

            Crossbow - Start off by buying a prod from somebody like Gladius or
            Siegfried and
            concentrate on building the tiller and the tickler. The notchlock style can
            be built in an
            afternoon and probably belongs in the beginner section. The rolling nut will
            take more
            time and skill. Maybe work up to building your own prods, wood, steel, and
            composite.

            Hornbow - Of course, it's difficult but not impossible. There are a growing
            numbers of
            bowyers tackling this. And, of course, if you make this bow, you are going
            to learn to
            shoot it the way it was meant to be shot even if you have to have the
            marshall clear the
            area for a 100 yards all around you for safety.


            The fun doesn't have to end when you leave the range.


            James Wolfden




            --
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            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • RJ Bachner
            As was suggested, Tim baker s treatise on selecting board staves is a huge help. To find wood, do not go to any lumber yard, find someplace that deals with
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 30, 2007
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              As was suggested, Tim baker's treatise on selecting board staves is a huge
              help.

              To find wood, do not go to any lumber yard, find someplace that deals with
              cabinetmakers and you will find much better wood and a wider selection.

              Quarter sawn wood is my fav for board staves as it is easier to make a safe
              bow with it. Flat sawn lumber seldom follows the grain properly and you end
              up having to chase a ring which if I wanted to do it, I would have used a
              tree stave.

              Hickory is a great bow wood but it has some big limits, one of which is it
              is a bitch to dry properly if you live in a humid climate. If yer out in the
              dessert then you will love hickory.

              I suggest you start with something like white ash or hard rock (sugar)
              maple. They are cheep most everywhere in North America and make great bows.

              Elm is great , as is white or red oak but more costly than ash and maple.

              Ragi

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
              Behalf Of Oakes, George
              Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 7:18 AM
              To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Archery Gear - A Do It Yourself A&S Guide

              Can we ask where you obtained your Elm Stave for your bows? I would like
              to make my own, and I was looking at Hickory, Oak, Ash, and Elm as the
              wood. I was leaning toward Hickory as it seems a lot of the wood bows
              available online are made from Hickory.

              Also while my local hardwood shop does carry these kinds of wood, I am
              not sure what kind of cut to ask for? do I want Quarter Sawn boards or
              something else.

              I know that basicaly I want a stave that the grain all runs as straight
              as possible so that when the wood is flexed it wont break out if the
              grain is not straight.

              Thanks much

              ________________________________

              From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com]
              On Behalf Of jameswolfden
              Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 12:49 AM
              To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [SCA-Archery] Archery Gear - A Do It Yourself A&S Guide


              <CONTENT TRIMMED OUT>...

              Longbow - Don't start in Yew right off the back. Both Ash and Elm were
              used in period and
              a stave cost about a quarter of the cost of yew. Much easier to work
              with than osage. I
              prefer elm myself. I got a seasoned elm stave and some windfall vine
              maple that I want to
              try and then, that yew is starting to look pretty tempting.


              The fun doesn't have to end when you leave the range.

              James Wolfden


              --
              [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

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