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Re: request for information on reflex/deflex bow kits

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  • Godwin fitzGilbert de Strigoil
    Having both a bamboo backed and a hickory backed bow, I can tell you both are great materials to make your bow s back from. My bamboo backed Padauk probably
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 26, 2007
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      Having both a bamboo backed and a hickory backed bow, I can tell you
      both are great materials to make your bow's back from.

      My bamboo backed Padauk probably shoots a bit faster, but it's more
      from the tiller than anything else.

      Both bows are 60+lb, and they shoot within 5ft/s of each other. Of my
      hickory backed yew bow, I have not heard many bows quieter, and of my
      bamboo backed bow, I have not shot many bows smoother.

      Other cultures mention that one should "listen" to your bow. Indeed it
      will tell you a lot about how it is functioning, and energy transfer.

      You should also "feel" your bow. Handshock can come from many places
      but the two biggest are: mismatched arrow weight (physical), and
      mismatched limb tips (speed). Relates to what I posted before.

      Godwin
    • logantheboweyder
      Go get a copy of the current (Either March-April, or April-May, I forget which) Primitive Archer magazine. It has step-by-step instructions on exactly how to
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 27, 2007
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        Go get a copy of the current (Either March-April, or April-May, I
        forget which) Primitive Archer magazine. It has step-by-step
        instructions on exactly how to make your own Reflex-Deflex longbow.
        The only thing that I saw that it left out was how to source your
        materials.

        Logan

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Phil" <evilmonkey@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm new to this list, so my apologies if these questions were
        previously answered. I purchased a very functional 72 inch longbow,
        which I am quite satisified with, except for the release shock. I
        also am afraid that the bow is a bit to light for my preference on
        draw. so I started researching what other cost effective means were
        available to build something, a little more elegant and
        personalized. I was directed to rudderbows by Philip Silva, and
        after an email with the owner he recommended I use either a 'u
        finish bow' or a reflex deflex kit (
        http://rudderbows.com/reflexdeflexkitspartspage.html )
        >
        > I do not want to rush into a misinformed, or poorly decided
        purchase, and I was curious if anyone else on the list has done
        business with them, or could perhaps give me an informed opinion on
        the reflex/deflex style longbows. From what I've seen online, they
        are effectively a hybrid between a longbow and recurve, with a
        slightly improved FPS & significantly reduced release shock. The
        drawback to shopping online of course is buyer beware.
        >
        > I've never built a bow before, in fact my woodworking skills are
        relatively nonexistant, however I am not intimidated at the project,
        very worse case scenario I end up with an expensive lot of firewood.
        I am curious however what those more informed might recommend, if
        its above the skillset of a beginner to accomplish, or if I should
        even be looking at a 'cheap' bow. Bow material is another question
        that I have, Bamboo? Is it worthwhile? I'm currently using a
        hickory/osange ELB, and I do like the look and relative limb
        response, although I have no basis of comparison.
        >
        > Thank you for any information, suggestions, or opinions you can
        respond with!
        > ~Phil
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • Fritz
        When Godwin fitzGilbert de Strigoil put fingers to keys it was 3/26/07 4:53 PM... ... When tillering: As you draw the bow on the tillering stick, watch the
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 27, 2007
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          When Godwin fitzGilbert de Strigoil put fingers to keys it was
          3/26/07 4:53 PM...

          > ... Handshock can come from many places
          > but the two biggest are: mismatched arrow weight (physical), and
          > mismatched limb tips (speed). Relates to what I posted before.

          When tillering:
          As you draw the bow on the tillering stick, watch the handle for any
          tipping or turning. Carve the bow so the handle stays utterly still
          while drawing on the stick. Any movement it makes during the draw, it
          'unmakes' on release. In your hand. All at once. Every time. Handshock.

          --
          Fritz
          Aut inveniam viam aut faciam.
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