Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: discussion question about arrow shafts

Expand Messages
  • Jim McCoin
    ... shafts. ... I use the ... the shafts ... pretty ... practice/competition though. ... Sometime in the dim past I read that Native Americans in the Southwest
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 23, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Lord Godwin FitzGilbert de
      Strigoil <archergodwin@...> wrote:
      >
      > For target shooting, I still buy manufactured shafts.
      >
      > For A&S, and in the short future -targets, I will be making my own
      shafts.
      >
      > I currently have several dozen ash and poplar blanks, 7/16 square.
      I use the
      > arrow-plane designed by John Strunk (great guy and bowyer) to round
      the shafts
      > with. If you are using pretty straight grained wood, it turns out a
      pretty
      > straight arrow.
      >
      > I have not used a self-made shaft yet in target
      practice/competition though.
      > Hopefully this year.

      Sometime in the dim past I read that Native Americans in the
      Southwest had no straight branches long enough to make arrows. They
      would mortice short lengths of straight wood together and bind them
      with sinew. That's what I call a creative hunter.

      Any one else heard of this?.

      Jim>
      > Godwin
      >
      >
      >
      > > Thu Feb 22, 2007 6:14 pm (PST)
      > >
      > >
      > > Thank you to thebowhunter, Simmon Sinneghe, Padraig,
      and Logan the
      > >
      > >Boweyder for responding to my earlier inquiry.
      > >
      > >I had hope for wider feedback, so in the hopes of generating more
      > >
      > >discussion, some more questions:
      > >
      > >How many fletchers out there have tried making shafts? Was it
      > >
      > >worthwhile or do you prefer to buy manufactured shafts?
      > >
      > >Did you make shafts in the round from shoots/small limbs, or did
      you
      > >
      > >cut them down from staves/larger pieces of wood?
      > >
      > >Which woods did you try? How did they work for you?
      > >
      > >Thanks again for your input. I enjoy all of the discussions on
      this
      > >
      > >list.
      > >
      > >Sol
      > >
      > >Argent, a sun between a base enarched and base sable.
      > >
      > >Jararvellir, Northshield
      >
      > ---- Msg sent via CableONE.net MyMail - http://www.cableone.net
      >
    • thebowhunter@swbell.net
      I mke mine both way s I used salt cedar Bamboo and buy POC from where ever I can find the right price for them. I use the salt cedar and Bamboo s on my self
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 23, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I mke mine both way's I used salt cedar Bamboo and buy POC from where
        ever I can find the right price for them. I use the salt cedar and
        Bamboo's on my self bow these are made from osage, I triesd osage for
        shafts material but they busted to quick seem to be to britle.
      • robb
        I ve tried to make my own. it does work theres lots of different woods you can use. I used shoots strip the bark heat them to straighten them and sanded them
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 28, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          I've tried to make my own. it does work theres lots of different
          woods you can use. I used shoots strip the bark heat them to
          straighten them and sanded them with some sand stone. the one problem
          is time and the spine of the arrow its easier to buy shafts, just for
          the fact its quicker and all arrows spine will match. If your looking
          to build some for display and not to shoot its great
          hope this helps

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Sol" <fula_chris@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you to thebowhunter, Simmon Sinneghe, Padraig, and Logan the
          > Boweyder for responding to my earlier inquiry.
          >
          > I had hope for wider feedback, so in the hopes of generating more
          > discussion, some more questions:
          >
          > How many fletchers out there have tried making shafts? Was it
          > worthwhile or do you prefer to buy manufactured shafts?
          >
          > Did you make shafts in the round from shoots/small limbs, or did
          you
          > cut them down from staves/larger pieces of wood?
          >
          > Which woods did you try? How did they work for you?
          >
          > Thanks again for your input. I enjoy all of the discussions on
          this
          > list.
          >
          > Sol
          > Argent, a sun between a base enarched and base sable.
          > Jararvellir, Northshield
          >
        • Janet
          I ve made arrows from both cedar and ash. Since my yew English longbow is 42#, I found the ash shafts to be much too heavy for me. I also prefer 5/16
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 28, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            I've made arrows from both cedar and ash. Since my yew English
            longbow is 42#, I found the ash shafts to be much too heavy for me. I
            also prefer 5/16" shafts, so finding other shaft wood options in that
            size and spine are difficult, and I don't want to go the laminated
            route. So at this time I'm kind of limited to using cedar.
            Erriil

            > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Sol" <fula_chris@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Thank you to thebowhunter, Simmon Sinneghe, Padraig, and Logan
            the Boweyder for responding to my earlier inquiry. I had hope for
            wider feedback, so in the hopes of generating more
            discussion, some more questions:
            > >
            Which woods did you try? How did they work for you?
          • thebowhunter@swbell.net
            I cut mine in shuts from salt cedar which is commonly knowns as Tamarack in some places. It is found growing in UTAH, COLORADO, NEW MEXICO, ARIZONA, NEVADA.
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 28, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              I cut mine in shuts from salt cedar which is commonly knowns as
              Tamarack in some places. It is found growing in UTAH, COLORADO, NEW
              MEXICO, ARIZONA, NEVADA. Along the river banks then I work them down
              with a steel plate and drill to the size I want. then I steam them
              straight and bundle them up. Then I will use ther compresion roller a
              few months latter finish them off you caan use dog wood martha stewart
              tommatoe stake rose bush.
              and if the arrow comes up to lite on the grsin side soak the in oil (I
              use mineral oil to do this), PVC TUBE that is capped off.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.