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Re: Crossbow strings

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  • John Atkins
    I have made Flemish crosbow strings and they work just dandy. Of course, like all Flemish strings they stretch at first and need to be twisted to compensate,
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 4, 2007
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      I have made Flemish crosbow strings and they work just dandy. Of
      course, like all Flemish strings they stretch at first and need to be
      twisted to compensate, but once stretched out they work just as well as
      a continuous loop (made those too). The conpensation for the crossbow
      versus a hand bow is that I served the end loops. I believe there is a
      great deal more stress on the end loops of a crossbow string than a hand
      bow string, thus the serving. I also double served the center/contact
      area as this tends to take a great deal of stress both from contact with
      the bolt end and the prod/guide rail. And, yes, they were pretty
      because they were two toned. Look good, shoot good.

      cog


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Scott B. Jaqua
      Crossbow strings do take a lot of abuse at the loops. In part because this is where the shock is greatest at the end of the power stroke. But also in part
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 4, 2007
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        Crossbow strings do take a lot of abuse at the loops. In part because
        this is where the shock is greatest at the end of the power stroke. But
        also in part because the string is bent around a very small radius.
        Another small radius is the sharp bend at the release nut when spanned.
        So these are the two places I have seen crossbow strings fail.

        Njall

        --
        Scott B. Jaqua
        Hagerson Forge, Custom Blades from Historic Patterns
        http://sjaqua.tripod.com
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