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Re: [SCA-Archery] Crossbow strings

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  • latorrej@aol.com
    In a message dated 2/2/2007 7:22:05 AM Pacific Standard Time, SiegfriedFaust@gmail.com writes: Now, that said, I could see the possibility of using two colors,
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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      In a message dated 2/2/2007 7:22:05 AM Pacific Standard Time,
      SiegfriedFaust@... writes:
      Now, that said, I could see the possibility of using two colors,
      basically making 2 endless loops on top of each other, and binding
      them together. But I would use a 'few more strands' than I would
      otherwise, to make up for the 'cut' in the string that you are making.
      I've used that method for a longbow string (to use up two different color
      leftovers!). The only problem was that, in serving the end loops, I wasn't
      careful to keep the colors separated. So, instead of a sting that appears to be
      two separate strands twisted together as in a flemish, the colors are
      distributed rather randomly. Doesn't look too bad, though, and works fine.

      Joseph de la Tour, West Kingdom


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Scott Jaqua
      You are in essence making two continuous loop strings. You may need an extra loop of both colors to make up for the break. That being said a few cautions. One,
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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        You are in essence making two continuous loop strings. You may need an
        extra loop of both colors to make up for the break. That being said a
        few cautions.

        One, don't knot your colors together. First wrap one color and anchor it
        on your jig and then do the other. Pull the ends of each color under
        the serving like usual. This might work better if you end the two colors
        on opposite ends of your jig.

        Two, make sure your two strands are equal in all ways. Diameter,
        strength, amount of wax, etc. If the strings are at all uneven, then
        they will stretch at different rates. This could put all the load on
        only one half of your string. The half that stretched out further or faster.

        And last, speaking of stretch, make sure you really pre-stretch your
        string before shooting it. Static force is much more forgiving then the
        force at release. String you crossbow for several days first. That will
        start the stretch. Then span the bow for several hours at a time. Last
        do a series of spanning a relaxing the bow. All this before your first
        shot. This will give as much stretch as possible and allow you see
        problems relating to how the string stretchs in early on.

        Njall
      • Rj Bachner
        What is wrong with a flemish crossbow string? You can mix colors as you wish and the braiding will even out the unequal bundle tension worries. Ragi ... From:
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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          What is wrong with a flemish crossbow string? You can mix colors as you wish
          and the braiding will even out the unequal bundle tension worries.

          Ragi

          -----Original Message-----
          From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of Scott Jaqua
          Sent: Friday, February 02, 2007 5:15 PM
          To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Crossbow strings

          You are in essence making two continuous loop strings. You may need an
          extra loop of both colors to make up for the break. That being said a
          few cautions.

          One, don't knot your colors together. First wrap one color and anchor it
          on your jig and then do the other. Pull the ends of each color under
          the serving like usual. This might work better if you end the two colors
          on opposite ends of your jig.

          Two, make sure your two strands are equal in all ways. Diameter,
          strength, amount of wax, etc. If the strings are at all uneven, then
          they will stretch at different rates. This could put all the load on
          only one half of your string. The half that stretched out further or faster.

          And last, speaking of stretch, make sure you really pre-stretch your
          string before shooting it. Static force is much more forgiving then the
          force at release. String you crossbow for several days first. That will
          start the stretch. Then span the bow for several hours at a time. Last
          do a series of spanning a relaxing the bow. All this before your first
          shot. This will give as much stretch as possible and allow you see
          problems relating to how the string stretchs in early on.

          Njall


          --
          [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

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        • Scott Jaqua
          ... you wish ... Nothing that I can think of. However it is outside my experience. I don t believe I have ever seen a flemish twist crossbow string. So I don t
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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            Rj Bachner wrote:

            > What is wrong with a flemish crossbow string? You can mix colors as
            you wish
            > and the braiding will even out the unequal bundle tension worries.

            Nothing that I can think of. However it is outside my experience. I
            don't believe I have ever seen a flemish twist crossbow string. So I
            don't know how it would work with the dynamic of a crossbow.

            Njall
          • i_griffen
            Many years ago I made a Flemish Crossbow string. For the life of me I am not able to remember the inches added to the prod length I think it was 6 . Iain
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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              Many years ago I made a Flemish Crossbow string. For the life of me I
              am not able to remember the inches added to the prod length I think it
              was 6".


              Iain Griffen

              --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Rj Bachner" <ragiwarmbear@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > What is wrong with a flemish crossbow string? You can mix colors as
              you wish
              > and the braiding will even out the unequal bundle tension worries.
              >
              > Ragi
            • i_griffen
              When I laied up the string I layed both colors at the same time using equal tension.I started the loop on one end of the jig and finished ith on the other end.
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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                When I laied up the string I layed both colors at the same time using
                equal tension.I started the loop on one end of the jig and finished
                ith on the other end. when I seerved the string the starting and
                ending were served into the eyes for the string.


                I will let you know if I had any problems after Estrella War


                Iain Griffen

                --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Siegfried <SiegfriedFaust@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > Unless you have some fancy multicolored Dacron ... then by
                definition
                > a multi-colored continuous loop string, doesn't exist.
                >
                > Since a continuous loop string derives much of it's strength by the
                > fact that it's one, bit, long, loop of string.
                >
                > No breaks.
                >
                > Now, that said, I could see the possibility of using two colors,
                > basically making 2 endless loops on top of each other, and binding
                > them together. But I would use a 'few more strands' than I would
                > otherwise, to make up for the 'cut' in the string that you are
                making.
                >
                > Though, at the same time, if you are wanting a multicolored look ...
                > why not just make a flemish string?
                >
                > Siegfried
                >
                > On 2/1/07, Ian Griffen <i_griffen@...> wrote:
                > > Has anyone had problems using a multi-corlored continuious loop
                crossbow string?
                > >
                > > Iain Griffen
                >
                >
                > --
                >
                ______________________________________________________________________
                ___
                > THL Siegfried Sebastian Faust - http://crossbows.biz/
                > Barony of Highland Foorde - Baronial Archery Marshal
                > Kingdom of Atlantia - Deputy Kingdom Earl Marshal for Target
                Archery
                > http://eliw.com/ - http://archery.atlantia.sca.org/
                >
              • Frederick Fenters
                I have made strings with 2 sets of loops. I usually make them in contrasting colors. If done correctly, no problems. Sigfried is right, you make the string
                Message 7 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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                  I have made strings with 2 sets of loops. I usually make them in
                  contrasting colors. If done correctly, no problems. Sigfried is right, you
                  make the string with an extra strand or two.



                  Padraig



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • i_griffen
                  ... What kind of dynamics are you thinking about? I m not sure how much but, the Flemish Twist is slightly heaver than the Continious loop. Iain Griffen
                  Message 8 of 16 , Feb 2, 2007
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                    >
                    > Nothing that I can think of. However it is outside my experience. I
                    > don't believe I have ever seen a flemish twist crossbow string. So I
                    > don't know how it would work with the dynamic of a crossbow.
                    >
                    > Njall
                    >
                    What kind of dynamics are you thinking about? I'm not sure how much
                    but, the Flemish Twist is slightly heaver than the Continious loop.

                    Iain Griffen
                  • Dayrl Merrill
                    I have made several 2 color continous loop crossbow strings, Actually as described 2 continous loops served together. How many extra strands if any would
                    Message 9 of 16 , Feb 3, 2007
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                      I have made several 2 color continous loop crossbow strings, Actually as
                      described 2 continous loops served together. How many extra strands if any
                      would depend on the poundage of the crossbow.

                      Rask

                      At 05:48 PM 2/2/07, you wrote:

                      >Rj Bachner wrote:
                      >
                      > > What is wrong with a flemish crossbow string? You can mix colors as
                      >you wish
                      > > and the braiding will even out the unequal bundle tension worries.
                      >
                      >Nothing that I can think of. However it is outside my experience. I
                      >don't believe I have ever seen a flemish twist crossbow string. So I
                      >don't know how it would work with the dynamic of a crossbow.
                      >
                      >Njall
                      >


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • John Atkins
                      I have made Flemish crosbow strings and they work just dandy. Of course, like all Flemish strings they stretch at first and need to be twisted to compensate,
                      Message 10 of 16 , Feb 4, 2007
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                        I have made Flemish crosbow strings and they work just dandy. Of
                        course, like all Flemish strings they stretch at first and need to be
                        twisted to compensate, but once stretched out they work just as well as
                        a continuous loop (made those too). The conpensation for the crossbow
                        versus a hand bow is that I served the end loops. I believe there is a
                        great deal more stress on the end loops of a crossbow string than a hand
                        bow string, thus the serving. I also double served the center/contact
                        area as this tends to take a great deal of stress both from contact with
                        the bolt end and the prod/guide rail. And, yes, they were pretty
                        because they were two toned. Look good, shoot good.

                        cog


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Scott B. Jaqua
                        Crossbow strings do take a lot of abuse at the loops. In part because this is where the shock is greatest at the end of the power stroke. But also in part
                        Message 11 of 16 , Feb 4, 2007
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                          Crossbow strings do take a lot of abuse at the loops. In part because
                          this is where the shock is greatest at the end of the power stroke. But
                          also in part because the string is bent around a very small radius.
                          Another small radius is the sharp bend at the release nut when spanned.
                          So these are the two places I have seen crossbow strings fail.

                          Njall

                          --
                          Scott B. Jaqua
                          Hagerson Forge, Custom Blades from Historic Patterns
                          http://sjaqua.tripod.com
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