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Re: Question Regarding Set in Self bows

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  • logantheboweyder
    Ragi s remarks are right on the dot, and I would echo them. Lower limbs also sometimes worn out too quickly if the step-through method of stringing the bow is
    Message 1 of 12 , Nov 21, 2006
      Ragi's remarks are right on the dot, and I would echo them.
      Lower limbs also sometimes worn out too quickly if the step-through
      method of stringing the bow is used.

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Rj Bachner" <ragiwarmbear@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Heya
      >
      > Those marks you see are called chrysalling and it happens when the
      wood
      > cells are crushed beyond their ability to spring back. In fact
      chrysals are
      > often wood cells crushed and deformed rather significantly and the
      finish
      > applied is also being crushed. It happens with wood. It also
      happens when
      > the wood is poorly tillered or a hinge is baddly treated and not
      repaired.
      >
      > If the bow is made so that the lower limb is shorter by an inch or
      so then
      > yes the lower limb is under more stress than the top and it should
      be
      > compensated for while tillering. This may very well be a poorly
      tillered bow
      > or it might have been a weakness in the wood that took a while to
      settle
      > after the tillering process.
      >
      > Set can be caused by any number of things such as too much
      moisture in the
      > wood, a poor design for the wood being used or wood being over
      strained by
      > the design, bad tillering, sheer bad luck and weak wood or someone
      drawing
      > the bow too far and not the way it was made.
      >
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