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RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: (no subject)

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  • James Koch
    Unless I am mistaken, when compounds bows were introduced back in the early seventies, people were still pretty much all shooting wooden arrows. I tend to
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 13, 2006
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      Unless I am mistaken, when compounds bows were introduced back in the early
      seventies, people were still pretty much all shooting wooden arrows. I
      tend to agree though, why use wood arrows with a metal and plastic bow when
      the traditionalists are periodically having trouble obtaining decent cedar
      shafts.
      >
      Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
    • Rj Bachner
      So don t use cedar, Hex shafts are much better quality. POC is largely crap lately anyways. Ragi ... From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 14, 2006
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        So don't use cedar, Hex shafts are much better quality. POC is largely crap
        lately anyways.

        Ragi

        -----Original Message-----
        From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of James Koch
        Sent: Monday, November 13, 2006 11:53 PM
        To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: (no subject)

        Unless I am mistaken, when compounds bows were introduced back in the early
        seventies, people were still pretty much all shooting wooden arrows. I
        tend to agree though, why use wood arrows with a metal and plastic bow when
        the traditionalists are periodically having trouble obtaining decent cedar
        shafts.
        >
        Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)




        --
        [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

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      • eulenhorst2000
        Nope. For state of the art equipment (even then) is was aluminum - Usally xx75 or x7 grades. Biggest problem was someone getting a new compound and then
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 16, 2006
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          Nope. For state of the art equipment (even then) is was aluminum -
          Usally xx75 or x7 grades. Biggest problem was someone getting a new
          compound and then shooting old wood shafts which had been sitting
          around for the last 20 years. Nothing technical, just user error. Use
          good equipment properly matched and you're fine. Enough time has
          passed that the original reasons have been lost and the folks passing
          on the legends don't know why, just what they were told (kind of what
          has happened in SCA traditions).
          Carolus

          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, James Koch <alchem@...> wrote:
          >
          > Unless I am mistaken, when compounds bows were introduced back in the
          early
          > seventies, people were still pretty much all shooting wooden arrows.
          I
          > tend to agree though, why use wood arrows with a metal and plastic
          bow when
          > the traditionalists are periodically having trouble obtaining decent
          cedar
          > shafts.
          > >
          > Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
          >
        • Sheldon the Just
          I was discussing this issue with the president of the archery club that I belong to at the last business meeting. He shoots both recurve and compound. He was
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 16, 2006
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            I was discussing this issue with the president of the
            archery club that I belong to at the last business
            meeting.

            He shoots both recurve and compound. He was also told
            never to use wooden arrows on a compound bow.

            The reason was that the major amount of energy is
            exerted on the arrow initially, when it leaves a long
            bow or recurve.

            With a compound bow, the initial force is less and
            then it increases as the arrow moves forward, due to
            the pulleys and cams.

            Due to archer's paradox, the arrow flexes around the
            bow.

            So due to this, the wooden arrows spline is
            effectively incorrect for the compound bow.

            Regards
            Sheldon the Just

            --- eulenhorst2000 <eulenhorst@...> wrote:

            > Nope. For state of the art equipment (even then) is
            > was aluminum -
            > Usally xx75 or x7 grades. Biggest problem was
            > someone getting a new
            > compound and then shooting old wood shafts which had
            > been sitting
            > around for the last 20 years. Nothing technical,
            > just user error. Use
            > good equipment properly matched and you're fine.
            > Enough time has
            > passed that the original reasons have been lost and
            > the folks passing
            > on the legends don't know why, just what they were
            > told (kind of what
            > has happened in SCA traditions).
            > Carolus
            >
            > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, James Koch
            > <alchem@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > Unless I am mistaken, when compounds bows were
            > introduced back in the
            > early
            > > seventies, people were still pretty much all
            > shooting wooden arrows.
            > I
            > > tend to agree though, why use wood arrows with a
            > metal and plastic
            > bow when
            > > the traditionalists are periodically having
            > trouble obtaining decent
            > cedar
            > > shafts.
            > > >
            > > Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >




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          • Fritz
            When Sheldon the Just put fingers to keys it was 11/16/06 11:02 PM... ... Yeah, it s a good rule: Never shoot arrows that are not well enough matched to the
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 16, 2006
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              When Sheldon the Just put fingers to keys it was 11/16/06 11:02 PM...

              > I was discussing this issue with the president of the
              > archery club that I belong to at the last business
              > meeting.
              >
              > He shoots both recurve and compound. He was also told
              > never to use wooden arrows on a compound bow.
              >
              > The reason was that the major amount of energy is
              > exerted on the arrow initially, when it leaves a long
              > bow or recurve.
              >
              > With a compound bow, the initial force is less and
              > then it increases as the arrow moves forward, due to
              > the pulleys and cams.
              >
              > Due to archer's paradox, the arrow flexes around the
              > bow.
              >
              > So due to this, the wooden arrows spline is
              > effectively incorrect for the compound bow.


              Yeah, it's a good rule:
              Never shoot arrows that are not well enough matched to the bow to be safe.

              I wouldn't expect arrows spined for a 50# longbow to fly well out of a
              50# compound be they wood or carbon or aluminum. But it's going to take
              a lot of doing to convince me that it would be unsafe.

              Any time a rule says 'Never...', I assume it's because whatever it is is
              unsafe. If the problem is that it doesn't work well, the rule should
              say, "It doesn't work well to..."

              --
              Fritz
              Aut invenian viam aut faciam.
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