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Re: [SCA-Archery] Ancient defense

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  • Taslen
    Were ther any images or decrition of this device? sounds very interesting. Gaelen Kinjal of Moravia wrote: In reading an account of
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 8, 2006
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      Were ther any images or decrition of this device? sounds very interesting.

      Gaelen

      Kinjal of Moravia <gusarimagic@...> wrote:
      In reading an account of the seige of Tyre by Alexander (332BC), I
      found a reference to the use of large wheels within the walls used to
      deflect missles sent over the walls -- arrows, darts and javalins.
      These wheels were spun during an attack and snagged the missles, often
      without damage for reuse. The attackers were unaware of this defense
      and wasted thousands of arrows in attempts to harrass the citizens in
      the streets below.

      I wonder if this technique was ever used in medieval times???

      kinjal






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    • jameswolfden
      I have never heard/read about anything similiar in medieval times. It seems to me be a complicated means to do something simple. A simple wood pavise would
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 8, 2006
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        I have never heard/read about anything similiar in medieval times. It
        seems to me be a complicated means to do something simple. A simple
        wood pavise would have done mostly the same thing. The other problem
        with something like this, is that it is only going to protect those
        under it. Move the archers and you either have to build another
        shield/wheel or move the one you have.

        In a walled city, shooting over the wall is a tactic to unnerve the
        citizens. As such, I would not consider the arrows wasted. Chances were
        you never going to hit anybody anyways. They would just stay away from
        the arrow drop zone. Especially in a city like Tyre which was a walled
        island. It would not that easy to move the archers from one location to
        another without being seen. As such, most of Alexander's archers would
        likely be on the mole he was building. And if the arrows are making the
        citizens build rotating wheel shields, they are busy doing something
        other than counterattacking. The arrows have done their damage - but
        it's a psychological damage. It lets them know that the enemy is still
        here.

        And, in the end, Alexander conquered Tyre, killed many of its citizens
        and enslaved the rest. All Tyre's defense did was let it hold out
        longer than other cities. It's main defenses were its location, the
        high walls, and, initially, its superiority in naval battles.

        James


        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Kinjal of Moravia"
        <gusarimagic@...> wrote:
        >
        > In reading an account of the seige of Tyre by Alexander (332BC), I
        > found a reference to the use of large wheels within the walls used to
        > deflect missles sent over the walls -- arrows, darts and javalins.
        > These wheels were spun during an attack and snagged the missles,
        often
        > without damage for reuse. The attackers were unaware of this defense
        > and wasted thousands of arrows in attempts to harrass the citizens in
        > the streets below.
        >
        > I wonder if this technique was ever used in medieval times???
        >
        > kinjal
        >
      • John Rossignol
        Which account are you reading? John
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 9, 2006
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          Which account are you reading?

          John


          Kinjal of Moravia wrote:

          >In reading an account of the seige of Tyre by Alexander (332BC), I
          >found a reference to the use of large wheels within the walls used to
          >deflect missles sent over the walls -- arrows, darts and javalins.
          >These wheels were spun during an attack and snagged the missles, often
          >without damage for reuse. The attackers were unaware of this defense
          >and wasted thousands of arrows in attempts to harrass the citizens in
          >the streets below.
          >
          >I wonder if this technique was ever used in medieval times???
          >
          >kinjal
          >
          >
          >
        • Kinjal of Moravia
          ... The famous Delphian Course, Vol 1 Kinjal ... I ... used to ... javalins. ... often ... defense ... citizens in
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 9, 2006
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            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, John Rossignol <giguette@...>
            wrote:
            >
            The famous Delphian Course, Vol 1

            Kinjal
            ......................................

            > Which account are you reading?
            >
            > John
            >
            >
            > Kinjal of Moravia wrote:
            >
            > >In reading an account of the seige of Tyre by Alexander (332BC),
            I
            > >found a reference to the use of large wheels within the walls
            used to
            > >deflect missles sent over the walls -- arrows, darts and
            javalins.
            > >These wheels were spun during an attack and snagged the missles,
            often
            > >without damage for reuse. The attackers were unaware of this
            defense
            > >and wasted thousands of arrows in attempts to harrass the
            citizens in
            > >the streets below.
            > >
            > >I wonder if this technique was ever used in medieval times???
            > >
            > >kinjal
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
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