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Re: [SCA-Archery] Newbie Question

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  • Fritz
    When Rob put fingers to keys it was 10/27/06 12:36 PM... ... The SCA allows arrow rests on any bow. ... Were I in your position, I d build the bow like I was
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 27, 2006
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      When Rob put fingers to keys it was 10/27/06 12:36 PM...

      > Hello all,
      >
      > I am new to Archery and the SCA. ... longbow...
      > flatbow ... can either have an arrow rest?

      The SCA allows arrow rests on any bow.


      > ...I am now working on my 2nd bow and before I finish it I would
      > like to know if the arrow rest is acceptable.

      Were I in your position, I'd build the bow like I was going to cut the
      rest in, then not cut it in. I'd try shooting without the rest for a
      while and then decide how I felt about it, and cut or not cut the rest
      accordingly. Not something you can do with a working handle (which is
      really cool feeling to shoot).

      When shooting off your hand (without a rest), nock the arrow a little
      (~1/4") higher than you might otherwise.

      - Fritz
    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
      The Quick answere is no. If it does it is called an American longbow. All the period bows that I know about do not have cutouts for arrow rests. D
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 27, 2006
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        The Quick answere is no. If it does it is called an American longbow. All
        the period bows that I know about do not have cutouts for arrow rests. "D"
        section bows work through the handle. Flat bows from bog bows to Ishi's had
        handles thick enough they did not flex(much). Still no arrow rest. Most
        shot off the finger, the horse bows shoot off the thumb. Those who cannot
        stand to shoot off the finger use either a stiff piece of leather
        around/over the finger or a small wedge of leather stuffed into the handle
        wrap to create a small shelf.

        James Cunningham
        English longbow shooter("D" section horn nocks)

        >> I am new to Archery and the SCA. I was just wondering about the
        > longbow. Can a Longbow have an arrow rest? I know that the English
        > Longbow has a "D" cross section and a working handle. Then there's the
        > flatbow Which didnt have the "D" cross section it was just flat
        > instead of the rounded belly. can either have an arrow rest? is it
        > traditional or authentic?
        >
        > The reason I ask is I never shot a bow till i made my own. I made it a
        > flat bow with a stiff handle with the arrow rest notched into the
        > handle. I am now working on my 2nd bow and before I finish it I would
        > like to know if the arrow rest is acceptable.
        >
        > I scrolled trough alot of the post's already up, but honestly I
        > couldnt go through all of them.
        >
      • Rob
        On my bow it has a small piece of leather that is glued onto the bow at the tip of the handle wrapping. It works great as a rest. I will get a close up pic
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 28, 2006
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          "On my bow it has a small piece of leather that is glued onto the
          bow at the tip of the handle wrapping. It works great as a rest. I
          will get a close up pic and add it to my photo album here.
          Hope this helps. Lance"

          TY Lance I will have to try the leather piece. And yes it does help
          =)

          "The bottom line answer is, yes, for shooting in the SCA arrow
          rests are acceptable. Dalton"

          Short and sweet LOL Tnx

          "Were I in your position, I'd build the bow like I was going to
          cut the rest in, then not cut it in. I'd try shooting without the
          rest for a while and then decide how I felt about it, and cut or not
          cut the rest
          accordingly. Not something you can do with a working handle (which
          is really cool feeling to shoot)."

          Here in lies my issue now. I tried it yesterday. I finally made a
          string of hemp that holds the current draw weight on the bow.(I
          still cringe when I draw, waiting for it to snap and wack myself in
          the face =/ ) Unfortunately no stores around me have the right size
          string and I couldn't wait to shoot it.
          So I shot off hand and it shoots straighter or truer than the
          lighter draw weight one I made center shot. Well I flipped through
          my notes and books and am now hit with the spline situation. I shoot
          cheap arrows I bought just for practice until I get to making my
          own. But now I need to figure out what spline arrow im going to need.

          "When shooting off your hand (without a rest), nock the arrow a
          little (~1/4") higher than you might otherwise. - Fritz"

          Thanks for the tip and I mentioned earlier this is all new to me so
          all tips are gladly welcomed =)

          "The Quick answer is no. If it does it is called an American
          longbow. All the period bows that I know about do not have cutouts
          for arrow rests. "D" section bows work through the handle. Flat bows
          from bog bows to Ishi's had handles thick enough they did not flex
          (much). Still no arrow rest. Most
          shot off the finger, the horse bows shoot off the thumb. Those who
          cannot stand to shoot off the finger use either a stiff piece of
          leather around/over the finger or a small wedge of leather stuffed
          into the handle wrap to create a small shelf. James Cunningham
          English longbow shooter("D" section horn nocks)"

          Nice TY for that bit of info. I am trying to stay as traditional as
          possible so that all helps. Now there is a bow I was told to look
          into to try. And I apologize but my book with the actual name is at
          work and I cant remember the correct spelling of it. It is something
          like Nordenguarde (feel free to laugh, I am =D ). I hear it as wider
          limbs closer to the handle. Well anyways I had did some web searches
          for it when I had the name correct but couldn't find many pictures
          on it, would you happen to know what im talking about and maybe a
          site that has pics?

          TY ALL again for the responses and advice I do truly appreciate it
          all.

          Rob Erlandr the Lost
        • mikeG
          ... When I got my longbow, with a cord wrap around the handle, I put an extra wrapping of leather thong around it, to show me where to grip the bow each time,
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 28, 2006
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            On Fri, 27 Oct 2006 20:39:41 -0400, you wrote:

            >The Quick answere is no. If it does it is called an American longbow. All
            >the period bows that I know about do not have cutouts for arrow rests. "D"
            >section bows work through the handle. Flat bows from bog bows to Ishi's had
            >handles thick enough they did not flex(much). Still no arrow rest. Most
            >shot off the finger, the horse bows shoot off the thumb. Those who cannot
            >stand to shoot off the finger use either a stiff piece of leather
            >around/over the finger or a small wedge of leather stuffed into the handle
            >wrap to create a small shelf.
            >
            >James Cunningham
            >English longbow shooter("D" section horn nocks)
            >
            When I got my longbow, with a cord wrap around the handle, I put an
            extra wrapping of leather thong around it, to show me where to grip
            the bow each time, so that I'd always be holding the arrow in the same
            place. The first time I shot the bow, I found out that having the bow
            hand uncovered is not a smart thing to do; the fletching cut a lovely
            slice across the base of my thumb. Ouch!
            I made a deerskin glove(fingerless) for my bow hand, and haven't had
            that trouble since.
            Recently(last Pennsic) I had to replace the cord wrapping around my
            bow handle. I replaced it with rawhide lace, soaked and applied while
            still wet. The lace shrank as it dried, and made a nice tight grip. I
            started wrapping the lace at the top of the grip, which left a little
            almost-loop sticking up. This is where I put my hand, and the
            locating point for my arrows. It's not really a rest, since the
            arrows wouldn't stay there if my hand wasn't there to support them.
            Gardr Gunnarsson
          • James W. Pratt, Jr.
            Let me rephrase the Quick answere. No period bows do not have much of an arrow rest. SCA on the other hands allow a lots of diferent kinds of rests. Certain
            Message 5 of 15 , Oct 28, 2006
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              Let me rephrase the Quick answere. No period bows do not have much of an
              arrow rest. SCA on the other hands allow a lots of diferent kinds of rests.
              Certain archery contests in and outside the SCA do not allow rests ie: IKAC
              period bow and mundane English long bow shoots.

              James Cunningham
              > >The Quick answere is no. If it does it is called an American longbow.
              All
              > >the period bows that I know about do not have cutouts for arrow rests.
              "D"
              > >section bows work through the handle. Flat bows from bog bows to Ishi's
              had
              > >handles thick enough they did not flex(much). Still no arrow rest. Most
              > >shot off the finger, the horse bows shoot off the thumb. Those who
              cannot
              > >stand to shoot off the finger use either a stiff piece of leather
              > >around/over the finger or a small wedge of leather stuffed into the
              handle
              > >wrap to create a small shelf.
              > >
              > >James Cunningham
              > >English longbow shooter("D" section horn nocks)
              > >
              > When I got my longbow, with a cord wrap around the handle, I put an
              > extra wrapping of leather thong around it, to show me where to grip
              > the bow each time, so that I'd always be holding the arrow in the same
              > place. The first time I shot the bow, I found out that having the bow
              > hand uncovered is not a smart thing to do; the fletching cut a lovely
              > slice across the base of my thumb. Ouch!
              > I made a deerskin glove(fingerless) for my bow hand, and haven't had
              > that trouble since.
              > Recently(last Pennsic) I had to replace the cord wrapping around my
              > bow handle. I replaced it with rawhide lace, soaked and applied while
              > still wet. The lace shrank as it dried, and made a nice tight grip. I
              > started wrapping the lace at the top of the grip, which left a little
              > almost-loop sticking up. This is where I put my hand, and the
              > locating point for my arrows. It's not really a rest, since the
              > arrows wouldn't stay there if my hand wasn't there to support them.
              > Gardr Gunnarsson
              >
              >
            • Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
              Rob, I shoot longbow also, and my first bow (as in built by me) is a hickory backed yew. I use a small leather wedge held in place by the leather wrapped
              Message 6 of 15 , Oct 29, 2006
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                Rob,

                I shoot longbow also, and my first bow (as in built by me) is a hickory
                backed yew. I use a small leather wedge held in place by the leather
                wrapped handle, thereby also utilizing a arrow nocking point on the string.

                My second bow is a bamboo backed vermillion, and I shoot off my gloved
                hand. I do not use a nocking point on the string. The leather wrap
                around the handle part of the bow, gives me the parameters of where to
                grip the bow. As I put an arrow to the string, based on my hand
                position, I just modify the angle of the arrow as to what I know is
                correct, and shoot. It's not as difficult as you might think, and in my
                case, it makes it easier.

                Both bows are about 62lb.

                The difference between a "cut in rest", and shooting off the side of the
                bow, is how well matched your arrows need to be to your bow. A cut in
                rest will allow more mismatch in spine/weight. When you start
                incorporating the "archer's paradox", your arrows must be closely
                matched to your bows needs (spine/weight). You are wanting the arrow to
                bend around the bow exactly the right amount so that when it clears the
                bow, it is traveling in the line of where you are "aiming".

                Godwin
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