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String Nocks

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  • Michael Tyderek
    Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I m looking for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily availible. Any ideas?
    Message 1 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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      Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
      for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
      availible.

      Any ideas?
    • jay
      I wrap a bit of artificial sinew or serving thread around the string to make a nock point. (Kinda gotta if you use self-nocked arrows). Artificial sinew is
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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        I wrap a bit of artificial sinew or serving thread around the string
        to make a nock point. (Kinda gotta if you use self-nocked arrows).

        Artificial sinew is waxed and easier to move for minor adjustments.

        Calum


        At 7/11/2006, you wrote:
        >Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
        >for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
        >availible.
        >
        >Any ideas?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >--
        >[Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • thmcinnish
        This link has good instructions on how to install a string nock. I am a little slow at times and it took a few shots to get it right but it does work. I
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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          This link has good instructions on how to install a string nock. I am
          a little slow at times and it took a few shots to get it right but it
          does work. I installed one nock and have been toying with the idea of
          adding a second.

          http://www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwarmbear/diy/ton/tie.html
        • John edgerton
          Waxed thread is a less modern replacement. There is some question if nocking points were commonly used in period. Jon ... [Non-text portions of this message
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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            Waxed thread is a less modern replacement. There is some question if
            nocking points were commonly used in period.

            Jon
            On Tuesday, July 11, 2006, at 12:51 PM, Michael Tyderek wrote:

            > Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
            > for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
            > availible.
            >
            > Any ideas?

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jason C. Russo
            http://www.student.utwente.nl/~sagi/artikel/turkish/ Check these out. Authentic Turkish flight arrows, but they look tedius to make. ... [Non-text portions of
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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              http://www.student.utwente.nl/~sagi/artikel/turkish/

              Check these out. Authentic Turkish flight arrows, but they look tedius to
              make.


              On 7/11/06, Michael Tyderek <scadougal@...> wrote:
              >
              > Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
              > for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
              > availible.
              >
              > Any ideas?
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Bruce R. Gordon
              Greetings There are many alternatives to the little metal dinguses (dingi ?) - waxed threading, serving of differing colors, that sort of thing. But as to
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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                Greetings

                There are many alternatives to the little metal dinguses (dingi ?) - waxed threading, serving of differing colors, that sort of thing. But as to period practice? Can't say they didn't, and it seems it would be an obvious idea and easy to arrange - but I've never seen any pictures showing such a thing, nor read any period commentaries that refer to placement points unmistakably; Ascham doesn't mention them (but then, there's a lot that Ascham seems to glide over in silence...).

                Nigel

                Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
                > for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
                > availible.
                >
                > Any ideas?
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                --
                Three things never heard from the mouth of a Celt:
                "Do these colors match?"
                "Is this too much jewelry?"
                "Is that my drink?"

                http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/index.html


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James Koch
                I have made waxed linen strings. These tend to mash down a bit where the nock pinches. Perhaps with natural materials for strings, additional nocks weren t
                Message 7 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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                  I have made waxed linen strings. These tend to mash down a bit where the
                  nock pinches. Perhaps with natural materials for strings, additional nocks
                  weren't necessary. I shot without one on my old bow for years, but I have
                  a pretty good eye for nock placement. A good way to answer this question
                  is to look at primitive bows used in more modern times.
                  >
                  Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
                  >
                  >
                  >At 08:25 PM 7/11/2006, you wrote:

                  >Greetings
                  >
                  >There are many alternatives to the little metal dinguses (dingi ?) - waxed
                  >threading, serving of differing colors, that sort of thing. But as to
                  >period practice? Can't say they didn't, and it seems it would be an
                  >obvious idea and easy to arrange - but I've never seen any pictures
                  >showing such a thing, nor read any period commentaries that refer to
                  >placement points unmistakably; Ascham doesn't mention them (but then,
                  >there's a lot that Ascham seems to glide over in silence...).
                  >
                  >Nigel
                  >
                  >Research project: What are period (loosely) string nocks. I'm looking
                  > > for something other than the common brass nocks that are readily
                  > > availible.
                  > >
                  > > Any ideas?
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >--
                  >Three things never heard from the mouth of a Celt:
                  >"Do these colors match?"
                  >"Is this too much jewelry?"
                  >"Is that my drink?"
                  >
                  ><http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/index.html>http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/index.html
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Carl West
                  ... Yup, that s one way. What works for me (mind you I worship consistency before speed) is to serve it on. I do this on a flemish or twined string where
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jul 11, 2006
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                    thmcinnish wrote:
                    > This link has good instructions on how to install a string nock. I am
                    > a little slow at times and it took a few shots to get it right but it
                    > does work. I installed one nock and have been toying with the idea of
                    > adding a second.
                    >
                    > http://www3.sympatico.ca/ragiwarmbear/diy/ton/tie.html

                    Yup, that's one way.

                    What works for me (mind you I worship consistency before speed) is to
                    'serve' it on.
                    I do this on a 'flemish' or twined string where the nocking area has
                    been thickened by adding into the twining instead of adding the dead
                    weight of serving.

                    I make my nocks about a finger's width along the string. Much more
                    comfortable to shoot.

                    String the bow

                    mark the point where you want the arrow to contact the nocking point
                    with a pen or pencil. (above, below, up to you, and how you determine it
                    is up to you too).
                    For the example assume the arrow nocks under the nocking point.

                    unstring the bow

                    Lay an inch or two of one end of a 12 - 18" strand of 20-30 pound linen
                    (waxed) between the strands of the string at your mark.

                    re string the bow

                    firmly and tightly, with the short end hanging down (pointed toward the
                    bottom of the bow), take one turn of the long end around the bow string.

                    flip the short end up and take several more tight turns around the
                    bowstring working upward, keeping the short end taut

                    do this for about half the final width, then do the serving-ending
                    under-the-loop wrapping trick* for as many turns as you've already made,
                    leaving the short end out of it.

                    when that's all drawn up tight, trim flush the two ends coming out of
                    the middle of the nocking point.

                    Smooth, comfortable, cheap and requires no special tools, just some of
                    the linen you made your string with in the first place.


                    * Yeah, I know, I glossed over the magic part, I'm looking for a
                    description that's already on the web, haven't found one yet. It's a
                    tough one to describe without pictures and it's late, I'm not up to
                    making pictures just now. If someone knows what I'm on about and can
                    point to a good description, that'd be cool.

                    - Fritz
                  • thmcinnish
                    Can you clarify about thickening the string? Are you splicing in additional material to the flemish string or are you using using twining in place of the
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jul 12, 2006
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                      Can you clarify about thickening the string? Are you splicing in
                      additional material to the flemish string or are you using using
                      twining in place of the serving?

                      I have been looking for a way to thicken my string to improve the
                      string to nock fit. If there is a better way to improve the fit so
                      that it is more positive I would be open to that idea also.

                      Many thanks,
                      Thomas


                      > Yup, that's one way.
                      >
                      > What works for me (mind you I worship consistency before speed) is
                      to
                      > 'serve' it on.
                      > I do this on a 'flemish' or twined string where the nocking area
                      has
                      > been thickened by adding into the twining instead of adding the
                      dead
                      > weight of serving.
                      >
                      > I make my nocks about a finger's width along the string. Much more
                      > comfortable to shoot.
                      >
                      > String the bow
                      >
                      > mark the point where you want the arrow to contact the nocking
                      point
                      > with a pen or pencil. (above, below, up to you, and how you
                      determine it
                      > is up to you too).
                      > For the example assume the arrow nocks under the nocking point.
                      >
                      > unstring the bow
                      >
                      > Lay an inch or two of one end of a 12 - 18" strand of 20-30 pound
                      linen
                      > (waxed) between the strands of the string at your mark.
                      >
                      > re string the bow
                      >
                      > firmly and tightly, with the short end hanging down (pointed toward
                      the
                      > bottom of the bow), take one turn of the long end around the bow
                      string.
                      >
                      > flip the short end up and take several more tight turns around the
                      > bowstring working upward, keeping the short end taut
                      >
                      > do this for about half the final width, then do the serving-ending
                      > under-the-loop wrapping trick* for as many turns as you've already
                      made,
                      > leaving the short end out of it.
                      >
                      > when that's all drawn up tight, trim flush the two ends coming out
                      of
                      > the middle of the nocking point.
                      >
                      > Smooth, comfortable, cheap and requires no special tools, just some
                      of
                      > the linen you made your string with in the first place.
                      >
                      >
                      > * Yeah, I know, I glossed over the magic part, I'm looking for a
                      > description that's already on the web, haven't found one yet. It's
                      a
                      > tough one to describe without pictures and it's late, I'm not up to
                      > making pictures just now. If someone knows what I'm on about and
                      can
                      > point to a good description, that'd be cool.
                      >
                      > - Fritz
                      >
                    • dmerrill@omnicityusa.com
                      Different serving material had different thicknesses, you might look to find a spool of thicker serving material. Rask ... This message was sent using IMP, the
                      Message 10 of 12 , Jul 12, 2006
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                        Different serving material had different thicknesses, you might look to find a
                        spool of thicker serving material.

                        Rask


                        Quoting thmcinnish <thmcinnish@...>:

                        > Can you clarify about thickening the string? Are you splicing in
                        > additional material to the flemish string or are you using using
                        > twining in place of the serving?
                        >
                        > I have been looking for a way to thicken my string to improve the
                        > string to nock fit. If there is a better way to improve the fit so
                        > that it is more positive I would be open to that idea also.
                        >
                        > Many thanks,
                        > Thomas
                        >
                        >
                        > > Yup, that's one way.
                        > >
                        > > What works for me (mind you I worship consistency before speed) is
                        > to
                        > > 'serve' it on.
                        > > I do this on a 'flemish' or twined string where the nocking area
                        > has
                        > > been thickened by adding into the twining instead of adding the
                        > dead
                        > > weight of serving.
                        > >
                        > > I make my nocks about a finger's width along the string. Much more
                        > > comfortable to shoot.
                        > >
                        > > String the bow
                        > >
                        > > mark the point where you want the arrow to contact the nocking
                        > point
                        > > with a pen or pencil. (above, below, up to you, and how you
                        > determine it
                        > > is up to you too).
                        > > For the example assume the arrow nocks under the nocking point.
                        > >
                        > > unstring the bow
                        > >
                        > > Lay an inch or two of one end of a 12 - 18" strand of 20-30 pound
                        > linen
                        > > (waxed) between the strands of the string at your mark.
                        > >
                        > > re string the bow
                        > >
                        > > firmly and tightly, with the short end hanging down (pointed toward
                        > the
                        > > bottom of the bow), take one turn of the long end around the bow
                        > string.
                        > >
                        > > flip the short end up and take several more tight turns around the
                        > > bowstring working upward, keeping the short end taut
                        > >
                        > > do this for about half the final width, then do the serving-ending
                        > > under-the-loop wrapping trick* for as many turns as you've already
                        > made,
                        > > leaving the short end out of it.
                        > >
                        > > when that's all drawn up tight, trim flush the two ends coming out
                        > of
                        > > the middle of the nocking point.
                        > >
                        > > Smooth, comfortable, cheap and requires no special tools, just some
                        > of
                        > > the linen you made your string with in the first place.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > * Yeah, I know, I glossed over the magic part, I'm looking for a
                        > > description that's already on the web, haven't found one yet. It's
                        > a
                        > > tough one to describe without pictures and it's late, I'm not up to
                        > > making pictures just now. If someone knows what I'm on about and
                        > can
                        > > point to a good description, that'd be cool.
                        > >
                        > > - Fritz
                        > >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >




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                      • Carl West
                        ... The former I think. Note: I m using twine here as the verb that denotes the process of reverse-twisting used to assemble a flemish string. When I make
                        Message 11 of 12 , Jul 12, 2006
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                          thmcinnish wrote:
                          > Can you clarify about thickening the string? Are you splicing in
                          > additional material to the flemish string or are you using using
                          > twining in place of the serving?

                          The former I think.


                          Note: I'm using 'twine' here as the verb that denotes the process of
                          reverse-twisting used to assemble a 'flemish' string.


                          When I make the eye-loop, I add in a number of extra strands of linen,
                          usually 50% more. I twine the string together until the reinforcing
                          strands have run out and go an inch or two more.

                          I leave the strands straight until I get to a few inches above the
                          nocking area. Then I begin twining again. After an inch or so, I'll add
                          in a strand. It's about 16" long and I tuck it's middle into the crotch
                          of the twisting, straighten the twisted 'legs' so I can lay the new
                          strand smoothly in with the others. Then I make another twist or two and
                          add another strand. Keep doing this until the string fits very snugly in
                          your nocks. As the string stretches, it will shrink in diameter, take
                          that into account.

                          I twine past the end of the reinforcements again then leave it straight
                          until I get to the bottom of the string and I twine in reinforcements
                          for the area that'll have the bowyer's hitch, then I taper it out and
                          ideally end it with a _tiny_ figure-eight in the last few fibers of the
                          string.

                          Have I answered your question?


                          I prefer to reinforce the nocking area instead of serving it.
                          Serving hides the area that wears out on a linen string. For me, anyway,
                          that area cares not whether it is in direct contact with the arrow, it
                          wears out in it's time. If that part is bare, you can see when it's time
                          to replace the string _before_ it's dangling from your bow in two pieces.
                          And, serving adds no strength to the string. It is purely defensive. If
                          I'm going to add weight to the string, I want to get as much function
                          out of it as I can.


                          - Fritz
                        • thmcinnish
                          ... of ... linen, ... add ... crotch ... two and ... snugly in ... take ... straight ... reinforcements ... and ... the ... That answers my question. It is
                          Message 12 of 12 , Jul 13, 2006
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                            > Note: I'm using 'twine' here as the verb that denotes the process
                            of
                            > reverse-twisting used to assemble a 'flemish' string.
                            >
                            >
                            > When I make the eye-loop, I add in a number of extra strands of
                            linen,
                            > usually 50% more. I twine the string together until the reinforcing
                            > strands have run out and go an inch or two more.
                            >
                            > I leave the strands straight until I get to a few inches above the
                            > nocking area. Then I begin twining again. After an inch or so, I'll
                            add
                            > in a strand. It's about 16" long and I tuck it's middle into the
                            crotch
                            > of the twisting, straighten the twisted 'legs' so I can lay the new
                            > strand smoothly in with the others. Then I make another twist or
                            two and
                            > add another strand. Keep doing this until the string fits very
                            snugly in
                            > your nocks. As the string stretches, it will shrink in diameter,
                            take
                            > that into account.
                            >
                            > I twine past the end of the reinforcements again then leave it
                            straight
                            > until I get to the bottom of the string and I twine in
                            reinforcements
                            > for the area that'll have the bowyer's hitch, then I taper it out
                            and
                            > ideally end it with a _tiny_ figure-eight in the last few fibers of
                            the
                            > string.
                            >
                            > Have I answered your question?

                            That answers my question. It is difficult to visualize so I'll have
                            to get some material out and start experimenting. I am still new to
                            archery and string making so it will just take time to learn.

                            Thank you.
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