Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows

Expand Messages
  • Lady Sabran
    You might want to try hexshafts.com I really like their arrow shafts and my whole family uses them for their arrows. Carres Sabran Tir Ysgithr, Atenveldt ...
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      You might want to try hexshafts.com I really like their arrow shafts and my whole family uses them for their arrows.

      Carres Sabran
      Tir Ysgithr, Atenveldt


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Sheri Rees<mailto:s.l.rees@...>
      To: sca-archery@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sca-archery@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, June 30, 2006 11:04 AM
      Subject: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows


      Hi all,

      I know some of you run 'archery shops' and others just have some good
      info on what's out there.

      Does anyone know where I can get long shafting for arrows? Either
      cedar, hardwood, bamboo, or footed shafts? My hubby has a ridiculous
      36" draw length and I made him a yew longbow at that draw.

      Thanks much
      Shadhra





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Rj Bachner
      Well most suppliers of arrow shafts deal in 32 inches as a max, if you find someone who cuts their own shafting then they can make you arrows any length you
      Message 2 of 12 , Jul 1, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Well most suppliers of arrow shafts deal in 32 inches as a max, if you find
        someone who cuts their own shafting then they can make you arrows any length
        you need. I can also explain how to make your own shafts if you wish, they
        can be done by hand and if you can make a longbow of yew then you can make
        your own arrows.

        I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
        those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
        worse.

        You might consider going to a hardware store and collecting 4 foot dowels in
        the spine and weight you need, if you don't know how find someone who has a
        spine jig and a grain scale to select out the arrows you need.

        What draw weight is the bow at his draw length anyways?

        Ragi

        -----Original Message-----
        From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
        Behalf Of Sheri Rees
        Sent: Friday, June 30, 2006 2:05 PM
        To: sca-archery@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows

        Hi all,

        I know some of you run 'archery shops' and others just have some good
        info on what's out there.

        Does anyone know where I can get long shafting for arrows? Either
        cedar, hardwood, bamboo, or footed shafts? My hubby has a ridiculous
        36" draw length and I made him a yew longbow at that draw.

        Thanks much
        Shadhra



        --
        [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Sheri Rees
        All good ideas Ragi, I have tried sorting through the dowels at the store. 2 main problems - I ve never found more than 6-8 straightish ones at a time and I
        Message 3 of 12 , Jul 2, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          All good ideas Ragi,

          I have tried sorting through the dowels at the store. 2 main
          problems - I've never found more than 6-8 straightish ones at a time
          and I have a 2yr old who quickly gets bored with this game.

          I haven't tried making my own - not sure I have the correct tools and
          again that 2 yr old who gets bored. Are the instructions on your DIY
          pages? Or please send them to me - I'll give it a try. The added
          weight from footing may be acceptable if that's all I can find. Some
          of these may become hunting arrows - if he determines that he can hit
          the target accurately enough.

          I made the bow to be 58 lb at 36". His big problem with other bows
          is that by the time he pulls them back to his full draw length they
          stack horribly and pinch his fingers. And shooting a 80+ pound bow
          when you're first starting is not exactly conducive to learning. So
          I made one as tall as him (80 inch) with a modest poundage at his
          range (equates to something like 32 lb at 28").

          Thanks
          Shadhra

          At 11:25 AM 7/1/2006, you wrote:
          >Well most suppliers of arrow shafts deal in 32 inches as a max, if you find
          >someone who cuts their own shafting then they can make you arrows any length
          >you need. I can also explain how to make your own shafts if you wish, they
          >can be done by hand and if you can make a longbow of yew then you can make
          >your own arrows.
          >
          >I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
          >those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
          >worse.
          >
          >You might consider going to a hardware store and collecting 4 foot dowels in
          >the spine and weight you need, if you don't know how find someone who has a
          >spine jig and a grain scale to select out the arrows you need.
          >
          >What draw weight is the bow at his draw length anyways?
          >
          >Ragi
        • Rj Bachner
          Heya Yeah the dowel route takes time for sure, I would not worrry so much about straightness as nice straight clean grain.all the rest can be fixed. The
          Message 4 of 12 , Jul 2, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Heya

            Yeah the dowel route takes time for sure, I would not worrry so much about
            straightness as nice straight clean grain.all the rest can be fixed.

            The instructions are not on my diy pages. In fact I cant add anything new as
            my webspace is a problem soon to be fixed.

            The basic tools you will need are a doweling cutter from lee valley
            http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=1&p=52401&cat=1,180,42288

            a drill that can handle 1/2 inch square stock and some sandpaper and an
            accuarte drill sizing guage.

            The dowel cutter works well but I suggest you rig up something to guide to
            outfeed for the whole length of the arrow, say a 1 inch pvc pipe so that the
            dowel does not wobble and break as it spins then sandpaper it smooth.

            Get the 3/8 inch model and have fun, I suggest using something cheap and
            simple till you get good, like 1/2 by 40 inch poplar square stock.

            As for the bow, 36 inches is very long for a draw, so the longer bow must
            have a lot of handshock. I would love to see your work none the less.

            If you do not wish to make your own arrows I would be happy to make you
            some. I would have to charge accordingly but I can do it. Get back to me
            privately if you want and we can see what we can do.

            www.shoppe.brokenaxe.ca is my arrowmaking business so go take a look and see
            if my styles appeal to you.


            Have fun.

            ragi




            -----Original Message-----
            From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
            Behalf Of Sheri Rees
            Sent: Sunday, July 02, 2006 12:38 PM
            To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows

            All good ideas Ragi,

            I have tried sorting through the dowels at the store. 2 main
            problems - I've never found more than 6-8 straightish ones at a time
            and I have a 2yr old who quickly gets bored with this game.

            I haven't tried making my own - not sure I have the correct tools and
            again that 2 yr old who gets bored. Are the instructions on your DIY
            pages? Or please send them to me - I'll give it a try. The added
            weight from footing may be acceptable if that's all I can find. Some
            of these may become hunting arrows - if he determines that he can hit
            the target accurately enough.

            I made the bow to be 58 lb at 36". His big problem with other bows
            is that by the time he pulls them back to his full draw length they
            stack horribly and pinch his fingers. And shooting a 80+ pound bow
            when you're first starting is not exactly conducive to learning. So
            I made one as tall as him (80 inch) with a modest poundage at his
            range (equates to something like 32 lb at 28").

            Thanks
            Shadhra

            At 11:25 AM 7/1/2006, you wrote:
            >Well most suppliers of arrow shafts deal in 32 inches as a max, if you find
            >someone who cuts their own shafting then they can make you arrows any
            length
            >you need. I can also explain how to make your own shafts if you wish, they
            >can be done by hand and if you can make a longbow of yew then you can make
            >your own arrows.
            >
            >I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
            >those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
            >worse.
            >
            >You might consider going to a hardware store and collecting 4 foot dowels
            in
            >the spine and weight you need, if you don't know how find someone who has a
            >spine jig and a grain scale to select out the arrows you need.
            >
            >What draw weight is the bow at his draw length anyways?
            >
            >Ragi



            --
            [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

            Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Jeffrey Webb
            Greetings, I haven t purchased from them in a while, but the folks at Allegheny Mountain Arrow Woods told me at the Trad Rendevous a few years back that they
            Message 5 of 12 , Jul 2, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Greetings,
              I haven't purchased from them in a while, but the folks at Allegheny Mountain Arrow Woods told me at the Trad Rendevous a few years back that they would make up shafts in 36" lengths on special order.(Back when I was making arrows for other people, I had a customer that was 6'6" tall and had a 35" draw)
              You might give them a call (if they're still in business).
              -Geoffrei

              check out the Eastwinds Tribal Drumming web-page at:

              http://community.webtv.net/jrosswebb1/EASTWINDStribal



              -----Original Message-----
              From: Sheri Rees
              Sent: Sunday, July 2, 2006 12:37 PM
              To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows

              All good ideas Ragi,

              I have tried sorting through the dowels at the store. 2 main
              problems - I've never found more than 6-8 straightish ones at a time
              and I have a 2yr old who quickly gets bored with this game.

              I haven't tried making my own - not sure I have the correct tools and
              again that 2 yr old who gets bored. Are the instructions on your DIY
              pages? Or please send them to me - I'll give it a try. The added
              weight from footing may be acceptable if that's all I can find. Some
              of these may become hunting arrows - if he determines that he can hit
              the target accurately enough.

              I made the bow to be 58 lb at 36". His big problem with other bows
              is that by the time he pulls them back to his full draw length they
              stack horribly and pinch his fingers. And shooting a 80+ pound bow
              when you're first starting is not exactly conducive to learning. So
              I made one as tall as him (80 inch) with a modest poundage at his
              range (equates to something like 32 lb at 28").

              Thanks
              Shadhra

              At 11:25 AM 7/1/2006, you wrote:
              >Well most suppliers of arrow shafts deal in 32 inches as a max, if you find
              >someone who cuts their own shafting then they can make you arrows any length
              >you need. I can also explain how to make your own shafts if you wish, they
              >can be done by hand and if you can make a longbow of yew then you can make
              >your own arrows.
              >
              >I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
              >those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
              >worse.
              >
              >You might consider going to a hardware store and collecting 4 foot dowels in
              >the spine and weight you need, if you don't know how find someone who has a
              >spine jig and a grain scale to select out the arrows you need.
              >
              >What draw weight is the bow at his draw length anyways?
              >
              >Ragi



              --
              [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

              Yahoo! Groups Links
            • Carl West
              ... In _general_ if the dowel is straight in the hardware store, it likely has continuous grain. Or maybe more accurately, If a dowel isn t straight in the
              Message 6 of 12 , Jul 2, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Rj Bachner wrote:

                > Yeah the dowel route takes time for sure, I would not worrry so much about
                > straightness as nice straight clean grain.all the rest can be fixed.

                In _general_ if the dowel is straight in the hardware store, it likely
                has continuous grain. Or maybe more accurately, If a dowel isn't
                straight in the store, the chances of it having continuous grain are
                slim. Straightness a reasonable first test. _Then_ check the grain.


                > As for the bow, 36 inches is very long for a draw, so the longer bow must
                > have a lot of handshock.

                I'm curious, why would a longer bow necessarily result in handshock?
                If it's well tillered and the arrows are heavy enough for the bows
                strength and speed, it could be really sweet and smooth.


                >> I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
                >> those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
                >> worse.

                The man is drawing _eight_ inches more than average, I expect the
                additional powerstroke will make up for the added weight quite admirably.

                The shafts could be footed with something light, it doesn't _have_ to be
                a dense hardwood if you're footing for length instead of durability or
                balance or style.

                I've long believed that it more important that the arrows leave the bow
                consistently than quickly.

                - Fritz
              • Godwin fitzGilbert de Strigoil
                ... much about ... bow must ... weight of ... will be ... admirably. ... to be ... ently than quickly. ... AMEN Fritz. Most folks understand the whole
                Message 7 of 12 , Jul 3, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Carl West <carl.west@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Rj Bachner wrote:
                  >
                  > > Yeah the dowel route takes time for sure, I would not worrry so
                  much about
                  > > straightness as nice straight clean grain.all the rest can be fixed.
                  >
                  > In _general_ if the dowel is straight in the hardware store, it likely
                  > has continuous grain. Or maybe more accurately, If a dowel isn't
                  > straight in the store, the chances of it having continuous grain are
                  > slim. Straightness a reasonable first test. _Then_ check the grain.
                  >
                  >
                  > > As for the bow, 36 inches is very long for a draw, so the longer
                  bow must
                  > > have a lot of handshock.
                  >
                  > I'm curious, why would a longer bow necessarily result in handshock?
                  > If it's well tillered and the arrows are heavy enough for the bows
                  > strength and speed, it could be really sweet and smooth.
                  >
                  >
                  > >> I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added
                  weight of
                  > >> those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing
                  will be
                  > >> worse.
                  >
                  > The man is drawing _eight_ inches more than average, I expect the
                  > additional powerstroke will make up for the added weight quite
                  admirably.
                  >
                  > The shafts could be footed with something light, it doesn't _have_
                  to be
                  > a dense hardwood if you're footing for length instead of durability or
                  > balance or style.
                  >
                  > I've long believed that it more important that the arrows leave the bow
                  > consist
                  ently than quickly.
                  >
                  > - Fritz
                  >

                  AMEN Fritz.

                  Most folks understand the whole spine/bow weight relationship, and for
                  the vast majority of folks that shoot modern centershot bows, that is
                  sufficient.

                  However when shooting bows with varying degrees of archers paradox
                  (longbows, magyars-type, some flatbows- etc...) you must also consider
                  the relationship of limb tip speed-to-physical weight (mass) of the
                  arrow. Plus the fact that spine weight becomes much more critical.

                  Then throw in FOC balance point, and also what you are *really*
                  shooting as a spine weight for your arrow. I guarantee that what you
                  spined your arrow at 'before' you started building it, is not what you
                  are actually shooting. Doesn't mean that the spine weight
                  'pre-assembly' is wrong.

                  Of course don't forget the other thing that modifies the spine weight
                  of the arrow: point weight. Heavier points virtually decrease the
                  spine weight, lighter ones virtually increase.

                  Handshock can come from different areas, the big two IMHO:
                  1. Mismatch on arrow mass and limb tip speed.
                  2. Bow limbs mismatched in final tiller.

                  ...ah... I'll stop rambling now.

                  Godwin
                • Rj Bachner
                  Yep your right about the straightness of grain but what I have found is that the way dowels are stored contributes to a lack of initial straightness. I have
                  Message 8 of 12 , Jul 3, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Yep your right about the straightness of grain but what I have found is that
                    the way dowels are stored contributes to a lack of initial straightness. I
                    have found many dowels that were good but bent due to gravity and poor
                    storage. A little heat a little bend and voila you have a nice straight
                    shaft. Ok they need to be trained straight a few times to make up for the
                    abuse they suffered as mere dowels but good arrows they remain. This is why
                    I say straightness of grain should be a primary concern for selecting dowels
                    for arrows. Once you are happy with the grain then you can start to measure
                    for spine and weight etc. Selecting for straightness of the dowel first may
                    cost you many dowels that would work but for a little effort.

                    The reason I said a long bow might suffer from handshock is that a long bow
                    has long limbs and those long limbs have a lot of mass to swing forward when
                    released and if not tillered properly they will have too much mass in the
                    outer limbs and so handshock.

                    Now I have started making long flat bows that act like a longbow with a more
                    arc of the ellipse bend with short flatbow length working limbs and a long
                    static handle. This gives me speed, low string angle and the stability of a
                    longbow without the effect of long working limbs. When I made flat bows of
                    72 inches with a short handle I found the bow to be a lot more shocky and I
                    was not happy with the performance.

                    Now we all know a longer bow inherently stores more energy than a short bow
                    all things considered but you pay for it with decreased efficiency in power
                    delivery.

                    Either I am not very good at tillering long bows or long working limbs are a
                    little more shocky and require heavy arrows to tame the bow and absorb all
                    that energy. I assumed the latter is more likely though my skill may be
                    wanting as well. ;) Your mileage may vary but that's what I have learned

                    Ragi

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf Of Carl West
                    Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 12:19 AM
                    To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Long arrows

                    Rj Bachner wrote:

                    > Yeah the dowel route takes time for sure, I would not worrry so much about
                    > straightness as nice straight clean grain.all the rest can be fixed.

                    In _general_ if the dowel is straight in the hardware store, it likely
                    has continuous grain. Or maybe more accurately, If a dowel isn't
                    straight in the store, the chances of it having continuous grain are
                    slim. Straightness a reasonable first test. _Then_ check the grain.


                    > As for the bow, 36 inches is very long for a draw, so the longer bow must
                    > have a lot of handshock.

                    I'm curious, why would a longer bow necessarily result in handshock?
                    If it's well tillered and the arrows are heavy enough for the bows
                    strength and speed, it could be really sweet and smooth.


                    >> I don't think footing is gonna be a good idea really, the added weight of
                    >> those longer shafts will slow down the arrows as is the footing will be
                    >> worse.

                    The man is drawing _eight_ inches more than average, I expect the
                    additional powerstroke will make up for the added weight quite admirably.

                    The shafts could be footed with something light, it doesn't _have_ to be
                    a dense hardwood if you're footing for length instead of durability or
                    balance or style.

                    I've long believed that it more important that the arrows leave the bow
                    consistently than quickly.

                    - Fritz



                    --
                    [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]

                    Yahoo! Groups Links
                  • jotl@ridgecrest.ca.us
                    ... Which is why you usually give it your best shot, then tune the arrow to the bow by shooting them and observing the results. It certainly helps to have an
                    Message 9 of 12 , Jul 3, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      At 3:29 PM 7/3/06 +0000, Godwin fitzGilbert de Strigoil wrote:

                      >However when shooting bows with varying degrees of archers paradox
                      >(longbows, magyars-type, some flatbows- etc...) you must also consider
                      >the relationship of limb tip speed-to-physical weight (mass) of the
                      >arrow. Plus the fact that spine weight becomes much more critical.
                      >
                      >Then throw in FOC balance point, and also what you are *really*
                      >shooting as a spine weight for your arrow. I guarantee that what you
                      >spined your arrow at 'before' you started building it, is not what you
                      >are actually shooting. Doesn't mean that the spine weight
                      >'pre-assembly' is wrong.
                      >
                      >Of course don't forget the other thing that modifies the spine weight
                      >of the arrow: point weight. Heavier points virtually decrease the
                      >spine weight, lighter ones virtually increase.
                      >
                      >Handshock can come from different areas, the big two IMHO:
                      >1. Mismatch on arrow mass and limb tip speed.
                      >2. Bow limbs mismatched in final tiller.

                      Which is why you usually give it your best shot, then tune the arrow to the
                      bow by shooting them and observing the results. It certainly helps to have
                      an experienced archer stand behind and observe.

                      James
                      jotl@...
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.