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Re: Arrow assembly questions

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  • Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
    Re: Arrow assembly questions
    Message 1 of 35 , Jun 24, 2006
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      Re: Arrow assembly questions
      <http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylc=X3oDMTJxZGpvbTdkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzI1OTUzMQRncnBzcElkAzE2MDA3Njc1MDMEbXNnSWQDMjExMjcEc2VjA2Rtc2cEc2xrA3Ztc2cEc3RpbWUDMTE1MTEzNDU1MA--;_ylg=1/SIG=11s93o3v5/**http%3a//groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/message/21127>



      Posted by: "thmcinnish" thmcinnish@...
      <mailto:thmcinnish@...?Subject=%20Re:%20Arrow%20assembly%20questions>
      thmcinnish <http://profiles.yahoo.com/thmcinnish>


      Fri Jun 23, 2006 6:20 am (PST)

      A few questions on the leather dye, stain, and linseed oil. How are
      each of these applied? What type of drying time should be allowed
      for the dye or stain before sealing? What adhesive would work best
      for applying the fletching to a linseed sealed shaft?
      --------------------

      So for the leather dye, using the swab applicator that usually comes
      with the bottle works just fine. As far as drying time, I would wait
      overnight to make sure the dye is pretty dry, so that if you laquer dip
      the shafts, the dye doesn't run a little. If you are doing two different
      colors, apply some painters masking tape (the new blue stuff works
      great, doesn't leave adhesive) and dye up to the tape. Reverse for the
      next color. You can always crest the transition area (can cover up a
      multitude of sins.... ;)

      Myself and two other gentles made shafts in our Baronial colors for our
      then Baron and Baroness, since they were archers themselves. I probably
      still have pictures around if anybody is interested in how they turned out.

      For my linseed oiled shafts, I apply the linseed after I glue the
      feathers on. Just use a Q-Tip type cotton swap to apply the linseed
      between the feathers. After the coats of linseed are applied and rubbed,
      that's when I wrap the feathers.

      I really like the linseed sealed shafts. The reason I went to the
      linseed sealed shaft instead of the laquer sealed is this: Quite a few
      of the targets we shoot or practice shooting at, generate a lot of
      frictional heat when slowing the arrow to a stop. (carboard, foam,
      carpet) This heats up whatever the target is made of, as well as
      whatever you have the shaft sealed with. Our current practice range, has
      layered cardboard and the laquered shafts are a lot harder to pull out,
      and some time they come out with a bit of cardboard on them. The linseed
      sealed shafts come out so much easier.

      Godwin


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
      Re: Arrow assembly questions
      Message 35 of 35 , Jun 24, 2006
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        Re: Arrow assembly questions
        <http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylc=X3oDMTJxZGpvbTdkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzI1OTUzMQRncnBzcElkAzE2MDA3Njc1MDMEbXNnSWQDMjExMjcEc2VjA2Rtc2cEc2xrA3Ztc2cEc3RpbWUDMTE1MTEzNDU1MA--;_ylg=1/SIG=11s93o3v5/**http%3a//groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/message/21127>



        Posted by: "thmcinnish" thmcinnish@...
        <mailto:thmcinnish@...?Subject=%20Re:%20Arrow%20assembly%20questions>
        thmcinnish <http://profiles.yahoo.com/thmcinnish>


        Fri Jun 23, 2006 6:20 am (PST)

        A few questions on the leather dye, stain, and linseed oil. How are
        each of these applied? What type of drying time should be allowed
        for the dye or stain before sealing? What adhesive would work best
        for applying the fletching to a linseed sealed shaft?
        --------------------

        So for the leather dye, using the swab applicator that usually comes
        with the bottle works just fine. As far as drying time, I would wait
        overnight to make sure the dye is pretty dry, so that if you laquer dip
        the shafts, the dye doesn't run a little. If you are doing two different
        colors, apply some painters masking tape (the new blue stuff works
        great, doesn't leave adhesive) and dye up to the tape. Reverse for the
        next color. You can always crest the transition area (can cover up a
        multitude of sins.... ;)

        Myself and two other gentles made shafts in our Baronial colors for our
        then Baron and Baroness, since they were archers themselves. I probably
        still have pictures around if anybody is interested in how they turned out.

        For my linseed oiled shafts, I apply the linseed after I glue the
        feathers on. Just use a Q-Tip type cotton swap to apply the linseed
        between the feathers. After the coats of linseed are applied and rubbed,
        that's when I wrap the feathers.

        I really like the linseed sealed shafts. The reason I went to the
        linseed sealed shaft instead of the laquer sealed is this: Quite a few
        of the targets we shoot or practice shooting at, generate a lot of
        frictional heat when slowing the arrow to a stop. (carboard, foam,
        carpet) This heats up whatever the target is made of, as well as
        whatever you have the shaft sealed with. Our current practice range, has
        layered cardboard and the laquered shafts are a lot harder to pull out,
        and some time they come out with a bit of cardboard on them. The linseed
        sealed shafts come out so much easier.

        Godwin


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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