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Re: [SCA-Archery] fiberglass in the period division?

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  • John Edgerton
    My idea, when I set up the Period division, was to find a way to help encourage both the use and construction of period style gear. If more archers want to
    Message 1 of 65 , May 1, 2000
      My idea, when I set up the Period division, was to find a way to help
      encourage both the use and construction of period style gear. If more
      archers want to shoot period style gear, then there will be reason for
      SCA bowyers to make more at reasonable prices and if there is enough
      demand it should increase the supply. And... if there is more of a supply
      at reasonable prices there will be more archers willing to buy and shoot
      it. Also, if there are more bowyers in the SCA making bows, then there
      will some( like Kaz) that are willing to share their knowledge and teach
      others how to as well.

      The SCA over the years has developed some fine armourers and many
      fighters wear excellent armor. The same should happen for archery.

      Those that do not wish to or can not yet obtain period style gear can
      continue to shoot in the Open division of the IKAC if they wish.

      But, I still feel at this time in the development of period style archery
      in the SCA, gear which "looks" period should still be allowed. If a solid
      fiberglass bow looks like a period bow and not a modern solid fiberglass
      bow it should be allowed.

      As time passes and, hopefuly, more archers use period gear and there are
      more SCA bowyers and bowyers that cater to the SCA, the minimum standards
      can continue to rise. It will help if when period division scores are
      shot, that information on the type of bow be included with the scores.

      It might help if something were included in the rules of the period division
      to indicate it is an evolving competition and that standards may rise in
      the future. This might help prevent cases like where archers bought modern
      longbows with cut in windows thinking that they are period in style.


      On another subject...Arrow rests.
      I think there is mention in Ascham of the use of pieces of cork held in
      place by the hand grip covering and being used as an arrow rest. I can not
      find my copy to double check.

      Jon
    • Chris Nogy
      Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches. Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row. Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other)
      Message 65 of 65 , May 9, 2000
        Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches.

        Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row.

        Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other) 1/4, 9/32, 5/16, 11/32, 3/8, 13/32

        On the bottom row, use a 4 flute countersink to bevel the edge to paper thin. (the 4 flute countersink has a tendency to chatter in steel, that is why it is good. It will make the exit side of the hole slightly larger that the original and somewhat ragged).

        Use the bevelled hole as a scraper (pull a little tension on the scraper, then pull it up and down the shaft, rotating the shaft as you work) and use the clean hole as a gauge.

        Stop at the hole just before the one you want, finish with sandpaper and your spine tester and scale.

        It works pretty fast after you get the hang of it, so the work goes quickly.

        With this setup you can do almost all the shaft sizes and spines you want.

        As soon as I get the time, I have some photos of the equipment, plus some other devices I have designed to help in the small shop, that I am going to put on a web page. I'll let the address be known when I get it done, but it looks like it will be next week or later.

        Kaz
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