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Consistent sighting

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  • WilliamTheArcher@aol.com
    As I develop my skills with the longbow, I continue to strive to learn things that will make me a better archer. My biggest challenge is knowing (on the first
    Message 1 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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      As I develop my skills with the longbow, I continue to strive to learn things
      that will make me a better archer.

      My biggest challenge is knowing (on the first shot...and then consistently)
      the proper elevation of my bow/arrow to ensure proper trajectory at 30 and 40
      yards. Though I shoot instinctually (as instinctually as I can), I have been
      thinking about taking steps to make my shots more consistent at longer ranges.


      Does anyone mark their bows for sighting?
      And if not...any tips?


      William the Archer
      >>—————————>


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Cian of Storvik
      I had tried using hash marks on a piece of tape on my ELB to mark the 40 yd. But had very poor results (They say you really need to stick with it for a
      Message 2 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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        I had tried using hash marks on a piece of tape on my ELB to mark the
        40 yd. But had very poor results (They say you really need to stick
        with it for a duration though before you will see any acclimation to a
        new technique). I had much better results by closing one eye and using
        an imaginary sight point that the arrow point was sitting over upon
        release (like recurve users do). In fact, my 40 was better then my
        30's while doing this.

        At 20 and 30, I shoot completely instinctively, but my highest rr last
        year was like a 61. This year, I have been shooting totally
        instinctively, but I haven't shot a legal royal round in about 6
        months. (I'm marshalling, and the one holding the stop watch, and
        making sure people don't shoot themselves).

        (Sigh) Such is the sacrifice we make for the safety of newbies.
        -Cian of Storvik
      • jameswolfden
        You have a number of options depending on the rules and traditions in your area. One option is just to keep doing on what your doing until your body learns
        Message 3 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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          You have a number of options depending on the rules and traditions in
          your area. One option is just to keep doing on what your doing until
          your body 'learns' the right elevation.

          In An Tir, limb marks are allowed in the Open Class of the Royal
          Rounds and in some tournaments or competitions. I have only seen it
          done on modern style recurves. The Longbow and Period classes of the
          Royal Round do not permit but you could shoot a longbow in the Open
          class (that's why it is called open).

          I use point of aim. I aim the tip of the arrow at a specific point
          which changes depending on the distance. Obviously, I try to pick a
          spot that will put the arrows regardless of distance in the gold. At
          least, that's the intention. For example, at 40 yards, I am aiming
          above the target; at 30 yards, I am aiming at the gold; and at 20
          yards, I am aiming below the target. There may be left/right
          variations depending on the whether the arrows are spined properly.

          Another option and one I think is better but can't seem to do it
          properly is gap shooting. The difference between gap shooting and
          point of aim is where you are focused on. In point of aim, you are
          focused on your arrow tip and the artificial point you decided on;
          the gold (your real target) is in your peripheral vision. In gap
          shooting, you are focused on the gold and the tip of arrow is in your
          peripheral. You adjust the gap between the target and the arrow tip
          as required for the distance.

          James Wolfden


          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, WilliamTheArcher@... wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > As I develop my skills with the longbow, I continue to strive to
          learn things
          > that will make me a better archer.
          >
          > My biggest challenge is knowing (on the first shot...and then
          consistently)
          > the proper elevation of my bow/arrow to ensure proper trajectory at
          30 and 40
          > yards. Though I shoot instinctually (as instinctually as I can), I
          have been
          > thinking about taking steps to make my shots more consistent at
          longer ranges.
          >
          >
          > Does anyone mark their bows for sighting?
          > And if not...any tips?
          >
          >
          > William the Archer
          > >>â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€">
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • rebeccaatthewell_2000
          I didn t know that there was actually a name for how I shoot !! Cool :) thanks Isabella ... At
          Message 4 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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            I didn't know that there was actually a name for how I shoot !!
            Cool :) thanks
            Isabella



            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "jameswolfden" <jameswolfden@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > I use point of aim. I aim the tip of the arrow at a specific point
            > which changes depending on the distance. Obviously, I try to pick a
            > spot that will put the arrows regardless of distance in the gold.
            At
            > least, that's the intention. For example, at 40 yards, I am aiming
            > above the target; at 30 yards, I am aiming at the gold; and at 20
            > yards, I am aiming below the target. There may be left/right
            > variations depending on the whether the arrows are spined properly.
            >

            >
            > James Wolfden
            >
          • Siegfried
            I use limb marks myself ... nice little ones, on my modern flatlimb longbow. I personally (just me) have some issues with rules (when they exist) that don t
            Message 5 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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              I use limb marks myself ... nice little ones, on my modern flatlimb longbow.

              I personally (just me) have some issues with rules (when they exist)
              that don't allow them. Since nothing stops a person from using marks
              in the grain of the wood, or other such things.

              I don't use them on my recurve for that reason. I didn't need to.
              Since the big black bolthead was a perfect 40, One glueline was a good
              30, and a scratch that the riser had developed a long while ago was a
              good 20.

              So I didn't use marks. But I was still shooting that way.

              Siegfried
              (Who does gap shooting with his crossbow though)

              --
              _________________________________________________________________________
              THL Siegfried Sebastian Faust - http://crossbows.biz/
              Barony of Highland Foorde - Baronial Archery Marshal
              Kingdom of Atlantia - Deputy Kingdom Earl Marshal for Target Archery
              http://eliw.com/ - http://archery.atlantia.sca.org/
            • James W. Pratt, Jr.
              I use one finger over tow under. I have marks for 20-30 and 40 yards on my recurve. I have not marked my longbow. For 100yards or more I use under the hand
              Message 6 of 9 , May 3, 2006
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                I use one finger over tow under. I have marks for 20-30 and 40 yards on my
                recurve. I have not marked my longbow. For 100yards or more I use under the
                hand to aim seems to work for all but my 50lb recurve. For 50-60-70 I use
                the tip of the arrow at foot of the target-top of the target and nuckle(sp)
                on the target. At 80-90 I am screwed the target is behind my hand.

                James Cunningham



                As I develop my skills with the longbow, I continue to strive to learn
                things
                that will make me a better archer.

                My biggest challenge is knowing (on the first shot...and then consistently)
                the proper elevation of my bow/arrow to ensure proper trajectory at 30 and
                40
                yards. Though I shoot instinctually (as instinctually as I can), I have been
                thinking about taking steps to make my shots more consistent at longer
                ranges.


                Does anyone mark their bows for sighting?
                And if not...any tips?


                William the Archer
                >>—————————>


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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              • THL Cain Saethydd
                I use a consistant anchor point, stance, and three finger under method of release. The string is in my sight picture, and rests on an easily identifiable,
                Message 7 of 9 , May 4, 2006
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                  I use a consistant anchor point, stance, and three finger under
                  method of release. The string is in my sight picture, and rests on an
                  easily identifiable, vertical, portion of the bow. The tip of the
                  arrow is sighted at a consistant point for the range/target, which is
                  determined from experience or practice rounds. I personaly dislike
                  limb marks, just a me thing.

                  If you are familiar with using open sights on rifles, you may be
                  familiar with I am about to say.

                  In the sight picture, everything should be crystal clear. Now,
                  theoreticaly, this is impossible. However, your mind can and will
                  compensate for the fuzzieness of the closer items. This is how it works:
                  The mind already knows what your string looks like, as well as your
                  bow and arrow. To accomplish the clear sight picture, change your
                  focus from the string to the bow, to the tip, then to the target. Do
                  this rapidly, and only once, or vertigo may result. YOU know what the
                  string, bow and arrow looks like, so they will be crystal clear in
                  your mind. This will take practice, lots of it. But when it happens,
                  you will be shocked. Soon it will be second nature, just a thoughtless
                  act as you set your draw.

                  Oddly enough, I actualy use this in hardsuit battles as well, when
                  swinging a sword. It is amazing how well it helps your battlefield
                  awareness and command ability.

                  Cain


                  --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, WilliamTheArcher@... wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > As I develop my skills with the longbow, I continue to strive to
                  learn things
                  > that will make me a better archer.
                  >
                  > My biggest challenge is knowing (on the first shot...and then
                  consistently)
                  > the proper elevation of my bow/arrow to ensure proper trajectory at
                  30 and 40
                  > yards. Though I shoot instinctually (as instinctually as I can), I
                  have been
                  > thinking about taking steps to make my shots more consistent at
                  longer ranges.
                  >
                  >
                  > Does anyone mark their bows for sighting?
                  > And if not...any tips?
                  >
                  >
                  > William the Archer
                  > >>â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€"â€">
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Nest verch Tangwistel
                  I don t use bow marks on my recurve, nor did I use them on my ELB. As someone mentioned they do have marks of their own, but I don t actively use them. At 20
                  Message 8 of 9 , May 4, 2006
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                    I don't use bow marks on my recurve, nor did I use them on my ELB. As someone mentioned they do have marks of their own, but I don't actively use them. At 20 and 30 I usually use the tip of the arrow at the ground in front of the target. At 40 the tip of the arrow is directly next to the target. Then I switch to gap aiming for the further distances. 50 my knuckle is just below the target. At 60 and beyond the target is behind my hand or arm, but using both eyes I can see it andmy hand. The hardest I have is around 100 yards. the target is behind my forearm just about where one of the clips on my armguard is. That of course assumes my armguard is sitting at the same place every time. 45 degrees for the really long shots is behind my biceps. At the other extreme below 20 yards I tend to shoot instinctively, and short draw the bow. This is not entirely on purpose though.

                    Nest

                    "James W. Pratt, Jr." <cunning@...> wrote:
                    I use one finger over tow under. I have marks for 20-30 and 40 yards on my
                    recurve. I have not marked my longbow. For 100yards or more I use under the
                    hand to aim seems to work for all but my 50lb recurve. For 50-60-70 I use
                    the tip of the arrow at foot of the target-top of the target and nuckle(sp)
                    on the target. At 80-90 I am screwed the target is behind my hand.

                    James Cunningham





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                  • Nest verch Tangwistel
                    Maybe you could get an MIT, and have them hold the watch for your turn? Nest Cian of Storvik wrote: At 20 and 30, I shoot completely
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 4, 2006
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                      Maybe you could get an MIT, and have them hold the watch for your turn?

                      Nest

                      Cian of Storvik <firespiter@...> wrote:


                      At 20 and 30, I shoot completely instinctively, but my highest rr last
                      year was like a 61. This year, I have been shooting totally
                      instinctively, but I haven't shot a legal royal round in about 6
                      months. (I'm marshalling, and the one holding the stop watch, and
                      making sure people don't shoot themselves).

                      (Sigh) Such is the sacrifice we make for the safety of newbies.
                      -Cian of Storvik



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