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Re: Question about bow pull weight

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  • THL Cain Saethydd
    Well, count on shooting at least 144 arrows in a day. Very few days will see you shooting this many, but a few War Scenarios for the target range, may be
    Message 1 of 51 , May 2, 2006
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      Well, count on shooting at least 144 arrows in a day. Very few days
      will see you shooting this many, but a few 'War Scenarios' for the
      target range, may be one. I would honestly consider a draw weight of
      38 to 42 pounds, with 38 to 40 being optimum, if you can handle the
      quantity of arrows you anticipate. The actual draw weight needed will
      be affected by your draw length, arrow length/weight, anchor point,
      release type, and, bow length and type.
      I have a 26.75in draw length, and use primarily a 40lb recurve or
      composite longbow, 66in and 62inch. My arrows are 11/32in, and rather
      tip heavy with a 145 to 160 grain point. The arrows are also somewhat
      longer than the 'established' norm. I anchor at the corner of my
      mouth, and use the 'three finger under' method for release. What this
      grants me is an aim point on the target at 40 yards.
      After using a 50lb recurve for two years, I was still having some
      trouble with a reliable 'set' point. Meaning, I would occasionaly fail
      to get a perfect position in my shoulders or some such. However, while
      the lighter bows of less than 38lb are easier to 'set', the heavier
      bows were easier to get a consistant release. (less likely to pluck
      the string) So I settled with a 40lb draw weight. The above is my
      example. It varies for everyone.

      It all boils down to this: What draw weight and bow type are you
      comfortable with? You can go to a heavier bow later down the road, but
      if you start with one too heavy for you, you will have to acquire a
      lighter one right away. Also, it is easier to acquire good shooting
      practices with a bow you are comfortable with. If you are familiar
      with recurves, I suggest starting there.

      Cain, Atenveldt, Bowmaster Elite

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "rebeccaatthewell_2000"
      <rebeccaatthewell_2000@...> wrote:
      >
      > I just recently joined the SCA and have put together a complete archer
      > outfit and only need to get a bow and some arrows. I have done
      > archery in college, but it has been awhile and I was wondering if
      > someone could just give me an idea on what bow weight to start with. I
      > can pull, hold, and shoot a 35# bow all day long, a 50# bow I can pull
      > and shoot but can't hold to aim. I am thinking about 45#. Does anyone
      > have an opnion and what I should look for in my search for a bow (type
      > of wood, build, etc...)
      >
      > Thanks for any help and advice.
      > Isabella
      >
    • John edgerton
      ... I have seen some nice examples of those in Braun s Historical Targets . ... Could you tell me where to find that information. Does the picture of he
      Message 51 of 51 , May 5, 2006
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        On Thursday, May 4, 2006, at 11:14 AM, J. Hughes wrote:

        > Of course there were the vogelschutzen. But, a lot of the woodblock
        > prints from Germany show circular targets. By the end of period the
        > target faces were painted works of art, usually circular. One of the
        > prizes at a schutzenfest was both the shot-up target and an unshot-at
        > copy.

        I have seen some nice examples of those in Braun's "Historical Targets".

        >
        > There is information on the targets used for competition in both
        > Ottoman Turkey and Mamluke Egypt. I even just recently came across a
        > picture of crossbowman shooting at a target in medieval Egypt...

        Could you tell me where to find that information. Does the picture of
        he crossbowman show the target in any detail?

        Jon

        >
        > Charles O'Connor
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