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Re: [SCA-Archery] fiberglass in the period division?

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  • Bob & Nancy Upson
    ... It does seem strange that we, the archery community, can t seem to reach any kind of clear concensus about whether we re more concerned about archery or
    Message 1 of 65 , Apr 29, 2000
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      > Actually , it wouldn't be the fact that we use sewing machines.....It
      > would be because we didn't raise the sheep, sheer them , wash and
      > comb the wool, hand spin it into yarn , weave on an open loom, and
      > THEN cut and sew by hand.<G>

      It does seem strange that we, the archery community, can't seem
      to reach any kind of clear concensus about whether we're more
      concerned about archery or making archery equipment. Or, for
      that matter, we can't seem to recognize that each archer's SCA
      goals just *might* be different.

      I don't know about the rest of you, but I don't recall *any* stirring
      tales about Robin Hood tillering a bow or plucking goose feathers.
      For that matter, I'm pretty sure I've never heard a story about
      William Tell adjusting the tickler on his crossbow or lacing on the
      prod... =)

      It's my hunch that many of us are pretty familiar with the history
      and craft of bowyering and fletching, but aren't particularly
      interested in *doing* it. I, for one, know how my laminated longbow
      differs from a period ELB. I know how my arrows (which I make
      using modern equipment) differ from their medieval counterparts.
      But, like the man said, I have other SCA interests than making
      reproduction equipment. My personal enjoyment from archery
      stems more from shooting periodesque equipment in periodesque
      shoots than from making (or buying) period reproductions to
      particate in mundane shoots (RR, IKAC, etc.).

      There are SCAdians out there shooting period reproductions with
      period arrows who have *no* inkling how they were made nor why
      they are made the way they are. At the same time, there are
      walking archery encyclopedia's out there shooting K-Mart
      fiberglass bows and crappy mismatched arrows. Somewhere in
      between are the people who have a smatterig of knowledge about
      archery history & basic equipment and shoot varying degrees of
      periodesque equipment. Which group more clearly embodies the
      "spirit of SCA archery?" IMHO, the equipment they use is the
      *least* most important element in the equation.

      How about we all just admit that there are different camps of
      archers with different _but entirely valid_ goals for their pursuit of
      archery excellence within the SCA and proceed from there. Okay?

      Macsen
    • Chris Nogy
      Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches. Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row. Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other)
      Message 65 of 65 , May 9, 2000
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        Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches.

        Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row.

        Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other) 1/4, 9/32, 5/16, 11/32, 3/8, 13/32

        On the bottom row, use a 4 flute countersink to bevel the edge to paper thin. (the 4 flute countersink has a tendency to chatter in steel, that is why it is good. It will make the exit side of the hole slightly larger that the original and somewhat ragged).

        Use the bevelled hole as a scraper (pull a little tension on the scraper, then pull it up and down the shaft, rotating the shaft as you work) and use the clean hole as a gauge.

        Stop at the hole just before the one you want, finish with sandpaper and your spine tester and scale.

        It works pretty fast after you get the hang of it, so the work goes quickly.

        With this setup you can do almost all the shaft sizes and spines you want.

        As soon as I get the time, I have some photos of the equipment, plus some other devices I have designed to help in the small shop, that I am going to put on a web page. I'll let the address be known when I get it done, but it looks like it will be next week or later.

        Kaz
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