Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-Archery] Archery Proposal

Expand Messages
  • Bruce R. Gordon
    Ahh, yes then. The Cunningham is perfectly fine. I was referring to ... (sigh) But Siegfried, it DID have a wooden stock to begin with. The present
    Message 1 of 59 , Mar 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Ahh, yes then. The Cunningham is perfectly fine. I was referring to
      > the modified Barnett, which was modified to have a wooden stock, but
      > still one that highly resembles a modern rifle stock.

      (sigh) But Siegfried, it DID have a wooden stock to begin with. The present configuration is a different wooden stock, one without a pistol grip, and looks very little like a rifle butt.

      >
      > They did not look medieval, they do not help us as an
      > educational-nonprofit organization promote medieval archery.


      Agreed, I guess. I certainly hope you don't believe that I'd present either the Cunningham (if it were intact) or the Barnett at a demo and argue that either resemble to one degree or another a Mediaeval bow? At an historical demonstration, we should provide the very best in re-created tackle, and I would never say or do anything different.

      Nigel
      --
      Three things never heard from the mouth of a Celt:
      "Do these colors match?"
      "Is this too much jewelry?"
      "Is that my drink?"

      http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/index.html


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • John edgerton
      Actually a more accurate term would be timed ends rather than speed ends. In the RR or IKAC the intent is to get as high a score as possible in the time
      Message 59 of 59 , Apr 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Actually a more accurate term would be timed ends rather than speed
        ends. In the RR or IKAC the intent is to get as high a score as
        possible in the time given, rather than just getting off as many arrows
        as possible. It is better to shoot four and get twenty points, than to
        shoot nine and get ten points.

        Yes, when shooting into a mass of tightly packed warriors, where most
        any arrow will hit someone, plain speed is important. But, in the
        instance of less tightly packed targets it is a case of accuracy and
        rapid rate of release. When you are trying not to hit a shield or one
        of your own men while attempting to get an arrow or bolt into a visor
        slot, accuracy is important. And then getting off an other shot as
        fast as possible to take out an other opponent, before they kill you or
        one of your friends is reason to shoot rapidly and accurately. Aside
        from sieges, there were countless small scale engagements, aside from
        major battles where a rapid and accurate rate of shooting was
        paramount. In the hunt, when beaters are driving herds of deer toward
        you, killing as many deer as possible for the larder is also important.

        As to period speed ends. Since there is little documentation of just
        how period competitions or training were done, it is difficult to
        positivity state that they were either used or not used. However, I
        do have a copy of a period illustration of a german crossbow
        competition showing an hour glass in the foreground. If it was using
        for timing the shooting or to indicate when to break for lunch, it is
        impossible to say.

        Jon

        On Monday, April 3, 2006, at 06:39 AM, J. Hughes wrote:

        >
        >
        > John edgerton <sirjon1@...> wrote: I would like to comment
        > regarding the RR and IKAC. The speed ends were
        > not tacked on later. They were there from the beginning. I wanted the
        > competitions to also test the ability to shoot rapidly and accurately
        > as would have been needed in combat or in the hunt. And on the RR,
        > when I made up the rules for it, I gave little thought to crossbows.
        >
        > Jon
        >
        > Is there any evidence of the use of speed rounds in a period archery
        > competition or a schutzenfest? While rate of fire is useful when the
        > archer is in a defensive position receiving a mounted charge or in an
        > archery counter archery role, it is not at all appropriate for the
        > sort of warfare in most found in period: siege warfare, when only in a
        > storming do you have the target rich environment that rewards speed of
        > discharge.
        >
        > Charles O'Connor
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.