Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [SCA-Archery] fiberglass in the period division?

Expand Messages
  • jotl@ridgecrest.ca.us
    ... How period a reconstructed artifact has to be to be authentic enough for use in our game is a thread that runs through all Society endeavors. Usually
    Message 1 of 65 , Apr 28, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Leif of Crescent Moon replied in part:

      >I guess that when you say you are going to have a "Period" division in a
      >shoot or competition, the real question is your definition of "Period". I
      >do not feel that fiberglass is period. But then again, I'm not sure that
      >linen strings are available enough for many people to obtain, or safe enough
      >for general use. So, I would like to continue to use my B-50 dacron flemish
      >twist string. I don't know what the answer is to the "period" question,
      >but, I don't think that fiberglass is it.

      How "period" a reconstructed artifact has to be to be authentic enough for
      use in our game is a thread that runs through all Society endeavors.
      Usually people strive for accurate appearance and function within
      reasonable safety (and cost/availability) bounds. There are many
      imaginative solutions and I do not see a problem as long as the person
      knows where the compromises are -- even for arts & science competition
      entries.

      I do not think that fiberglass is "it" either if the modern material is
      patently obvious. If tastefully hidden within the design, however, I
      believe that modern metals, synthetic fibers and plastics should continue
      to be acceptible for the IKAC period division for safety and stability of
      the bow. Are we going to ban fiberglass and aluminum crossbow prods as
      well in the period crossbow competitions? As long as period appearances
      are kept up and the bow configuration requires something of the skill
      required of a period target archer for a given class of weapon, what is the
      problem?

      James
      jotl@...
    • Chris Nogy
      Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches. Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row. Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other)
      Message 65 of 65 , May 9, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        Make your draw plate out of a piece of 16 gauge stainless, 7 x 2 inches.

        Lay out 2 rows of holes - 6 holes per row.

        Drill 2 holes (up and down from each other) 1/4, 9/32, 5/16, 11/32, 3/8, 13/32

        On the bottom row, use a 4 flute countersink to bevel the edge to paper thin. (the 4 flute countersink has a tendency to chatter in steel, that is why it is good. It will make the exit side of the hole slightly larger that the original and somewhat ragged).

        Use the bevelled hole as a scraper (pull a little tension on the scraper, then pull it up and down the shaft, rotating the shaft as you work) and use the clean hole as a gauge.

        Stop at the hole just before the one you want, finish with sandpaper and your spine tester and scale.

        It works pretty fast after you get the hang of it, so the work goes quickly.

        With this setup you can do almost all the shaft sizes and spines you want.

        As soon as I get the time, I have some photos of the equipment, plus some other devices I have designed to help in the small shop, that I am going to put on a web page. I'll let the address be known when I get it done, but it looks like it will be next week or later.

        Kaz
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.