Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[SCA-Archery] cresting

Expand Messages
  • Rick Shreve
    Greetings, I m looking for some info on cresting, is it period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation on this subject, I would appreciate the info. In
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 27, 2000
    • 0 Attachment
      Greetings,

      I'm looking for some info on cresting, is it
      period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation
      on this subject, I would appreciate the info.

      In Service:
      Griffith Ash the Archer

      __________________________________________________
      Do You Yahoo!?
      Talk to your friends online and get email alerts with Yahoo! Messenger.
      http://im.yahoo.com/
    • blkknighti@aol.com
      ... period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation on this subject, I would appreciate the info.
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 27, 2000
      • 0 Attachment
        In a message dated 4/28/2000 1:10:36 AM, griffith_ash@... writes:

        >I'm looking for some info on cresting, is it
        period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation
        on this subject, I would appreciate the info.<

        Of course this depends on your "period". The practice of cresting, I am told
        by what I consider an authority, was derived from the American Indians
        practice of banding arrows around 1800. I cannot say for sure.

        What I can say is that I have looked into this for the period of 1000-1600
        Europe and have never seen any thing like cresting. War arrows produced en
        masse were unlikely to have it due to lack of cause (identifying a persons
        arrow). Personal arrows would have cause.
        "Splicing" the fletch seems to be the practice for identification and I have
        seen several examples in that period and geography illustrations. A good
        example is in Hardys Longbow p107. There are examples in Arms and Armor of
        the Medieval Knight, by Edge and Paddock p161(spliced to form two distinct
        bands on the cock feather) and Medieval Warfare by Koch p178 (although this
        illustration they may not be spliced but they are clearly fleched with
        colored fletches different from others)
        With this evidence and that I have seen no evidence of Cresting or crowning
        the short answer in my opinion is if you fall within that period , no they
        are not. ;) I hope this helps.

        Whew.

        Richard
      • Rick Shreve
        ... Thank you for the information, unfortunatly my period is not in the 1800 s. But the info on the splicing helps. Once again thank you. In Service: Griffith
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 28, 2000
        • 0 Attachment
          --- blkknighti@... wrote:
          >
          > In a message dated 4/28/2000 1:10:36 AM,
          > griffith_ash@... writes:
          >
          > >I'm looking for some info on cresting, is it
          > period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation
          > on this subject, I would appreciate the info.<
          >
          > Of course this depends on your "period". The
          > practice of cresting, I am told
          > by what I consider an authority, was derived from
          > the American Indians
          > practice of banding arrows around 1800. I cannot say
          > for sure.
          >
          > What I can say is that I have looked into this for
          > the period of 1000-1600
          > Europe and have never seen any thing like cresting.
          > War arrows produced en
          > masse were unlikely to have it due to lack of cause
          > (identifying a persons
          > arrow). Personal arrows would have cause.
          > "Splicing" the fletch seems to be the practice for
          > identification and I have
          > seen several examples in that period and geography
          > illustrations. A good
          > example is in Hardys Longbow p107. There are
          > examples in Arms and Armor of
          > the Medieval Knight, by Edge and Paddock
          > p161(spliced to form two distinct
          > bands on the cock feather) and Medieval Warfare by
          > Koch p178 (although this
          > illustration they may not be spliced but they are
          > clearly fleched with
          > colored fletches different from others)
          > With this evidence and that I have seen no evidence
          > of Cresting or crowning
          > the short answer in my opinion is if you fall within
          > that period , no they
          > are not. ;) I hope this helps.
          >
          > Whew.
          >
          > Richard
          >


          Thank you for the information, unfortunatly my "period
          is not in the 1800's. But the info on the splicing
          helps. Once again thank you.

          In Service:
          Griffith Ash

          P.S. If someone does know of any other info on
          cresting or shaft painting (for target archery)
          I would greatly appriciate additional info.

          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Talk to your friends online and get email alerts with Yahoo! Messenger.
          http://im.yahoo.com/
        • Elizabeth Pidgeon
          Althouggh the list of Extant medieval arrows is vey scant and while my reserch is not to be concidered exaustive I have found no evedence that arrows were
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 30, 2000
          • 0 Attachment
            Althouggh the list of Extant medieval arrows is vey scant and while my
            reserch is not to be concidered exaustive I have found no evedence that
            arrows were crested in the Middle Ages , that is not to say they were not
            just the evedence has not proved it to me yet .
            What I do is serve the fletch with various colors of silk to tell my
            arrows from others , there is ample evedence of served flecthing .
            Karl
            Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com
            >
            Greetings,

            I'm looking for some info on cresting, is it
            period or not? If anyone knows of any documentation
            on this subject, I would appreciate the info.

            In Service:
            Griffith Ash the Archer
            <
          • Elizabeth Pidgeon
            Richard Crowning was practiced in the Middle Ages . the Ordanances of the Englis Wardrobe cite the painting of the flecth end of the shaft with Verti Greco
            Message 5 of 8 , Apr 30, 2000
            • 0 Attachment
              Richard
              Crowning was practiced in the Middle Ages . the Ordanances of the Englis
              Wardrobe cite the painting of the flecth end of the shaft with "Verti Greco
              " which would be in effect a green Crown , it is my opinion that the "Verti
              Greco " was possibly a deterent to insects .
              Karl
              Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com
              >With this evidence and that I have seen no evidence of Cresting or
              crowning
              the short answer in my opinion is if you fall within that period , no they
              are not. ;) I hope this helps.

              Whew.

              Richard
              <
            • blkknighti@aol.com
              ... Wardrobe cite the painting of the flecth end of the shaft with Verti Greco which would be in effect a green Crown , it is my opinion that the Verti
              Message 6 of 8 , Apr 30, 2000
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 4/30/2000 2:55:46 PM, ontis@... writes:

                > Crowning was practiced in the Middle Ages . the Ordanances of the Englis
                Wardrobe cite the painting of the flecth end of the shaft with "Verti Greco"
                which would be in effect a green Crown , it is my opinion that the "Verti
                Greco " was possibly a deterent to insects .<<

                I beg to differ slightly. The application of "Vrede Greco" was not used as a
                paint to mark the arrow for Identification. It is a substance containing
                cupric acetate in a glue base used as a fungiside and adherant for the
                fletching. It is well known as a fungiside not as a insectiside and was used
                on many wood products of the time. Adhesion was its primary function not
                identification and therefore should not be considered "cresting" as such.

                Thanks for giving me the opportunity to clarify my statement.

                Richard
              • Elizabeth Pidgeon
                Would anyone happen to know what is in Verti Greco ? Carl Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com ... I beg to differ slightly. The
                Message 7 of 8 , Apr 30, 2000
                • 0 Attachment
                  Would anyone happen to know what is in "Verti Greco " ?
                  Carl
                  Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com
                  >
                  I beg to differ slightly. The application of "Vrede Greco" was not used as
                  a
                  paint to mark the arrow for Identification. It is a substance containing
                  cupric acetate in a glue base used as a fungiside and adherant for the
                  fletching. It is well known as a fungiside not as a insectiside and was
                  used
                  on many wood products of the time. Adhesion was its primary function not
                  identification and therefore should not be considered "cresting" as such.
                  <
                • blkknighti@aol.com
                  ... Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com ... a paint to mark the arrow for Identification. It is a substance containing cupric acetate in a
                  Message 8 of 8 , Apr 30, 2000
                  • 0 Attachment
                    >Would anyone happen to know what is in "Verti Greco " ?
                    >Carl
                    Message text written by INTERNET:SCA-Archery@egroups.com
                    >
                    >>I beg to differ slightly. The application of "Vrede Greco" was not used as
                    a paint to mark the arrow for Identification. It is a substance containing
                    cupric acetate in a glue base used as a fungiside and adherant for the
                    fletching. It is well known as a fungiside not as a insectiside and was used
                    on many wood products of the time. Adhesion was its primary function not
                    identification and therefore should not be considered "cresting" as such.<<


                    I will explain further.
                    The Green "patina" formed of copper sulfate or copper chloride formed on
                    copper, brass, and bronze exposed to air or seawater for long periods of
                    time. It is powdered then placed in acetic acid (vinegar) which when reduced
                    again to a blue or green powder consisting of basic cupric acetate used as a
                    pigment and fungicide then mixed with glue as a vehicle.
                    Middle English vertegrez, from Old French verte grez, alteration of vert-de-Gr
                    ice : verd, green; see VERDURE + de, of (from Latin de) + Grice, Greece.
                    "Verti Greco" seems to be the Italian alteration.

                    Richard
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.