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Re: Skill Level vs. Skill Level

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  • Robyn Becker
    Many times we here in Atlantia alleviate the issue of rank by awarding prizes for each rank. That way, people are competing with others of their own rank, and
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 18, 2005
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      Many times we here in Atlantia alleviate the issue of rank by
      awarding prizes for each rank. That way, people are competing with
      others of their own rank, and not with the Grand Bowman Elite, or
      even the Grand Bowman. That way, everyone has fun, and even the
      beginners walk away feeling good about themselves and wanting to
      come back for more.

      When we do this, the issues between period handbow, longbow, recurve
      and crossbow suddenly don't matter.

      Reyne

      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Lord Caedmon Wilson
      <caedmon.wilson@g...> wrote:
      >
      > I shoot all three bow types.
      >
      > Should a crossbow compete against a longbow in a RR competition?
      Only
      > if the two archers are the same rank, is my answer.
      >
      > You are not going to have a "fair" contest when the two competing
      > archers don't have equivalent skill levels. Two Dragon archers is
      > fair. A dragon archer and a yeoman is not fair. The bow type
      doesn't
      > really matter.
      >
      > I am thinking that competitions should not be classifed by bow
      type,
      > but relative skill level.
      >
      > In combat, we hold novice tournies? Why? Because sending a novice
      > against a knight doesn't present very good odds for the novice.
      So,
      > we have a tourney to help showcase the novices together. Then we
      have
      > an open tourney to see how everyone matches together.
      >
      > The same principle should be tried with archery. Now, for most
      > novelty shoots of 20 yards or less, relative skill level
      differences
      > can be almost ignored. Every new archer I have trained has become
      > proficient at 20 yards and less, because that is the common
      practice
      > distance at my house. 5, 10, 15 and 20 yard targets.
      >
      > Now, to achieve a contest of parody, we need a way of equating
      > relative skill. The RR is not the worst way of providing that
      > information. A crossbowman shooting a 43 RR against a recurveman
      > shooting a 43 RR sounds quite fair to me.
      >
      > But, I am not a fan of using the RR as an event competition. I
      prefer
      > wreaths, wands, windows, stumps, leaves and styrofoam heads, among
      > other oddities.
      >
      > --
      > Lord Caedmon Wilson
      >
      > Oaken Regional Youth Combat Marshal
      >
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