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nock-points on asymmetrical bows

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  • Carl West
    On a conventional western bow, the arrow is nocked near the middle of the string. This makes it so that the nock-point travels in a fairly straight line upon
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 6 2:46 PM
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      On a 'conventional' western bow, the arrow is nocked near the middle of
      the string. This makes it so that the nock-point travels in a fairly
      straight line upon release. What happens with the Japanese (or other)
      asymmetrical bows? Are they tillered so that the nock-point travels
      straight?

      Why I ask:
      Yesterday I forgot my bow on the way to practice. When I got there I
      went off in the woods and found a solid enough bit of dead fir and used
      it as a ~20# bow. All it needed was the twigs trimmed and a string-nock
      in the fat end. I found a grip and nock-point that work fairly well, but
      I find it interesting that the nock-path that works is a distinct curve
      centered on the tip of the lower (fat,short) limb. The nock of the arrow
      rises for the first 20 or so inches of the release, levels off, then is
      pushed down very slightly just before the nock leaves the string. I'm
      shooting off my bare hand and had no problem and very little porpoising.

      -- Fritz

      Carl West
      mailto:carl.west@...
      http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
      ----------------------------------
      Thinking outside the box - Good
      Pooping outside the box - Bad
    • Marko Peussa
      The problem you encountered is present in Japanese longbows to some extent. Upon release, the lower short limb travels faster than the upper long limb. If the
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 7 12:11 PM
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        The problem you encountered is present in Japanese longbows to some
        extent. Upon release, the lower short limb travels faster than the
        upper long limb. If the archer does nothing, the upper limb of the bow
        tilts towards the archer. In the Heki Ryu Insai Ha school, this
        unwanted movement of the bow is prevented by the active work of the
        left hand during release.

        So for me, it kind of seems that you have a reversed condition meaning
        faster upper limb or something in the way you grip or the nocking
        point is way too high. It's really difficult to say without actually
        seeing what's going on.

        Regards,

        Klaus


        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Carl West <carl.west@c...> wrote:
        > On a 'conventional' western bow, the arrow is nocked near the middle of
        > the string. This makes it so that the nock-point travels in a fairly
        > straight line upon release. What happens with the Japanese (or other)
        > asymmetrical bows? Are they tillered so that the nock-point travels
        > straight?
        >
        > Why I ask:
        > Yesterday I forgot my bow on the way to practice. When I got there I
        > went off in the woods and found a solid enough bit of dead fir and used
        > it as a ~20# bow. All it needed was the twigs trimmed and a string-nock
        > in the fat end. I found a grip and nock-point that work fairly well,
        but
        > I find it interesting that the nock-path that works is a distinct curve
        > centered on the tip of the lower (fat,short) limb. The nock of the
        arrow
        > rises for the first 20 or so inches of the release, levels off, then is
        > pushed down very slightly just before the nock leaves the string. I'm
        > shooting off my bare hand and had no problem and very little porpoising.
        >
        > -- Fritz
        >
        > Carl West
        > mailto:carl.west@c...
        > http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
        > ----------------------------------
        > Thinking outside the box - Good
        > Pooping outside the box - Bad
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