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Lemon Wood Bow Staves

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  • Scott B. Jaqua
    This is not intended as a commercial post. I am in no way connected with the company in question. However, on my latest periodic check of Exotic Hardwood of
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 22 12:56 PM
      This is not intended as a commercial post. I am in no way connected with
      the company in question.

      However, on my latest periodic check of Exotic Hardwood of Latin
      America's site, I came across a listing for Lemon Wood for Bow Staves. I
      don't know if anyone was looking for any. But I thought it funny that a
      company that doesn't understand what Master Oso or myself are doing with
      the wood we buy, would understand the need of bowyers. (Note this
      company directs most of their product to wood carvers and turners)

      But in any case, the lemon wood bow stave material is listed on the
      companys what's new page.

      http://www.anexotichardwood.com/new_stuff.html

      For those that would like to know where this place is, its in Carlsbad
      California. About 4 blocks east of the 5 freeway. A cool place to visit.
      And they are more then willing to work with you over the phone or the
      web. They even have a web cam set-up to let you look at pieces remotely
      before you buy. I get a great deal of the handle material for my knives
      from these guys.

      Njall
    • John Edgerton
      The Society of Archer-Antiquaries Formed at the end of 1956 The Society of Archer-Antiquaries exists to further the study of the development of the bow and
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 2, 2016

        The Society of Archer-Antiquaries

         

        Formed at the end of 1956 The Society of

        Archer-Antiquaries exists to further the study

        of the development of the bow and arrow

        across the world from earliest times until the present

        day and to consider all matters relating to the history

        of archery in general. Your interest may be general

        or specific, academic or non-academic; but whatever

        course it takes you can be certain the Society will

        help you to learn more of the whole fascinating

        story of archery, whilst it will also welcome your own

        contribution to its collective store of knowledge.

        The Society is open to all with a thirst for knowledge

        or with wisdom to pass on, and is international in

        membership.

         

        Since the Society of Archer-Antiquaries’ principal

        purpose is the study of all aspects of the history of

        the bow and arrow, many varying articles, illustrated

        and prepared by specialist members, appear within the

        annual Journal.

         

        Some subjects covered have been:

        • Ainu archery • Amerindian bows • The English

        war-bow • Tudor longbows • Korean archery •

        Early archery societies • Crossbow construction •

        Japanese archery • Mongolian archery • Arrows of

        Africa • Medieval arrowheads • Incendiary arrows •

        Recreational arrows • Bow and Pike • Persian archery

        • Chinese archery • Thumb rings • Pre-historic

        archery • European crossbows • Performance data.

         

        Recent issues have articles on:

        • Plains archery shooting technique of North America

        • Bow Power • Serbian composite bows up to the

        third quarter of the 14th century • The Spoon of

        Diocles: a Roman arrow extractor of the 3rd century

        AD • Archery and the Ancient Order of Foresters •

        Thoughts on the asymmetry of the Japanese longbow

        (Yumi) • A recreational longbow from Bergen,

        Norway-the oldest in the world? • Chinese crossbow

        locks • More light on a medieval archer window

        • Arrows against linen and leather armour • Four

        Italian crossbows from the Bardini Museum • The

        Skeftington case of 1298: a reassessment of the first

        recorded description of a mediaeval English bow and

        arrow • A Curious crossbow from Cotehele.

         

        The 2015 issue contained:

        The Bosworth stone-bow discovered at Browsholme Hall.

        An Artic bow in the Gap museum. Problems in the nomenclature-a discussion. Chinese archery in America. The Paul H. Barton collection pt. V. The Deane brothers ‘Mary Rose’ bow, a longbow of wych elm? The Grand Western Archery Society Meeting, 1861-1988. An interesting North Italian bullet crossbow, from the late 16th century. ‘No crossbows to be used at the Club, ever’. Bows and arrows from the ‘Turkische Cammer’ in Dresden, Germany. The Belmesa/Oxyrhynchus Siyah.

         

        Two CDs of previous Journals Nos 1 – 45 will be

        sent as a gift to any member making a donation to the

        Society of £12 plus postage. It is stressed that these are

        for personal use of members only and that copyright

        applies to all articles.

         

        The website for the SAA is:

        http://www.societyofarcher-antiquaries.org/

         

        The SSA also maintains a forum for its members at:

        http://www.societyofarcher-antiquaries.org/forum/

         

        The Chairman of the Society is Hugh Soar, author of several excellent current books on historical archery.

         

        JSAA Editor’s note: Society of Archer-Antiquaries (SAA) membership is open to all interested persons. Annual dues of £25 (approximately $36 US, depending on the current exchange rate) include three news booklets and the annual journal. All overseas applicants may - if more convenient - use Paypal to send  25 GBP to bogaman@... adding £1 to cover the Paypal administration charge. Please make the payment in GBP (£ sterling) and mark it as “friends and family”.

         

        For further information, you may contact: Veronica-Mae, Hon Sec Society of Archer-Antiquaries.   saaforum@...

         

        Subscribe now, in time for the 2016 issue of the Journal.

         

        The following information was taken from the SAA web site with the permission and encouragement of their Secretary.

         

        Please repost to other interested archers.

         
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