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Re: Short Shoots & other thoughts

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  • Kinjal of Moravia
    ... wrote: Thanks for the expansive thoughts ... ... draw... (though it would require considerable overdraw to bring hte string up over the head and behind the
    Message 1 of 5 , May 6, 2005
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      --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Ben Reeder <unclestrongbow@y...>
      wrote:

      Thanks for the expansive thoughts ...

      > All very true, but even more essential to both of these is the
      draw... (though it would require considerable overdraw to bring hte
      string up over the head and behind the left ear)

      I believe that they used a shield device of some sort (sipar??) that
      lay on the bow arm and allowed overdraw. I had thought that these
      were for shooting short 'darts' as referenced in Crusade stories, but
      possibly they allowed extention of regular arrows as well. OF interst,
      of course, are bow designs that allow substancial overdraw. I have
      read that some bows can allow up to a 50% overdraw! If this is true,
      is it actually 'overdraw' or just incredible flexibility for boyers?

      Anyone have any info here??

      kinjal
    • s.l.rees@ieee.org
      The siper is a Turkish handheld device which allows about a 3 inch overdraw. The Turks shot arrows about 25 inches long generally. The majra or nawak is
      Message 2 of 5 , May 6, 2005
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        The 'siper' is a Turkish handheld device which allows about a 3 inch
        overdraw. The Turks shot arrows about 25 inches long generally.
        The 'majra' or 'nawak' is an Arab or Persian device for shooting 'darts'.
        It's a long tube that the dart fits in and the string runs up a slot in
        the back of the tube. This tube could be attached to the bow forming a
        crude crossbow. Also seen in Byzantine & Korean archery.

        Shadhra

        > I believe that they used a shield device of some sort (sipar??) that
        > lay on the bow arm and allowed overdraw. I had thought that these
        > were for shooting short 'darts' as referenced in Crusade stories, but
        > possibly they allowed extention of regular arrows as well. OF interst,
        > of course, are bow designs that allow substancial overdraw. I have
        > read that some bows can allow up to a 50% overdraw! If this is true,
        > is it actually 'overdraw' or just incredible flexibility for boyers?
        >
        > Anyone have any info here??
        >
        > kinjal
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Carolus von Eulenhorst
        Two uses of the term. Usually overdraw is the ability to draw the bow to a point where the arrow point rests behind the belly of the bow. Although, it
        Message 3 of 5 , May 6, 2005
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          Two uses of the term. Usually overdraw is the ability to draw the bow to a
          point where the arrow point rests behind the belly of the bow. Although,
          it typically refers to doing this with normal length arrows. Whatever
          "normal" means in this case. Never really seems clear to me how the
          distinction is made. I'm not really sure how this applies to a bow
          designed to be drawn a great distance with short arrows using a custom rest
          like a sipar to let the arrows normally rest behind the belly.

          The other use of the term seems better to me. That is drawing the bow past
          the point to which it was meant to be pulled. This one just seems better
          as the use of "over" implies it is beyond normal.
          Carolus

          At 04:29 AM 5/6/2005, you wrote:

          >--- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Ben Reeder <unclestrongbow@y...>
          >wrote:
          >
          >Thanks for the expansive thoughts ...
          >
          > > All very true, but even more essential to both of these is the
          >draw... (though it would require considerable overdraw to bring hte
          >string up over the head and behind the left ear)
          >
          >I believe that they used a shield device of some sort (sipar??) that
          >lay on the bow arm and allowed overdraw. I had thought that these
          >were for shooting short 'darts' as referenced in Crusade stories, but
          >possibly they allowed extention of regular arrows as well. OF interst,
          >of course, are bow designs that allow substancial overdraw. I have
          >read that some bows can allow up to a 50% overdraw! If this is true,
          >is it actually 'overdraw' or just incredible flexibility for boyers?
          >
          >Anyone have any info here??
          >
          > kinjal
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >---8<---------------------------------------------
          >Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
          >Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
          >
          >[Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
          >
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
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        • Scott B. Jaqua
          I thought which came to me while reading this list. There is a side benefit to long distance shooting that I don t believe anyone else has brought up. It s
          Message 4 of 5 , May 6, 2005
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            I thought which came to me while reading this list. There is a side
            benefit to long distance shooting that I don't believe anyone else has
            brought up. It's something I first notice in my collage/NAA/FITA
            shooting days.

            No matter if shooting un-timed ends or speed rounds, the follow through
            stage of the archers form is very important. The bow needs to be stable
            at least long enough for arrow to clear the rest. But some snap shooters
            don't even hold form that long.

            Shooting long distance is one of the best ways I know to lengthen the
            follow through. Especially if in practice you use the exercise of
            holding form until the arrow strikes the target. The first time I did
            this at 90m I was amazed at how long it took. I held form, for what I
            thought was a long time, figured i didn't hear the hit, put the bow down
            and just started to talk to my target mate, when the arrow finally did
            hit. Could have knock me over with a feather. Went back and made a point
            of holding form. Did that all day and the next time out my shooting was
            much better for it. I still try to do it, to this day. It's kind of hard
            to here the hit on clout shoots (unless you hit the flag pole, which I
            seem to do at least once each shoot), but otherwise I try to hold form
            and hold aim, until I hear the thunk.

            Just my 2 bits
            Njall
            (break out the black balloons and the over the hill jokes, the SCA is
            40!, Happy Birthday!)
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