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quivering

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  • Kinjal of Moravia
    I have noted previous discussions of quiver placement and later questions as to speed rounds I have gleened this thoughts for my readings. These are
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 30, 2005
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      I have noted previous discussions of quiver placement and later
      questions as to 'speed rounds' I have gleened this thoughts for my
      readings. These are opinions not necessarily related to any specific
      thread or project. Serious researchers desiring documentation may
      contact me off-list. This is relevant to 'western culture' as these
      techniques helped small groups of Mongols defeat large European armies
      in the 13th century, and is meant to encourage interest and enjoyment
      of traditional archery in all its forms and practices.

      Many horse archers including Mongols, Huns and Scythians did use back
      quivers -- often shielded to provide back protection as well as arrow
      availablility. Of importance is that they arrows were carried point
      out, with the fletching protected by webbing inside. Thus the arrows
      were extacted point first and nocked with the hand well away from the
      string. Then with the arrow held by the bow finger the thumb ring
      would be wrapped at the nock and the arrow drawn to the ear. The
      final draw was accomplished by pushing the bow away from the body
      while aiming and instantly released when dropped on target.

      This all makes sense, as you might drop arrows from a galloping horse
      if just held by the nock and wet fletching do little to aid
      performance.

      I do not know what 'speed advantage' is gained by these methods, but
      someone may care to test this (horse not required).


      kinjal
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