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Re: [SCA-Archery] self nock question

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  • jrosswebb1@webtv.net
    Greetings, An insert looks real pretty and it will help to strengthen a nock (ash may be hard, but it still splits, it just takes a lot more to split it). I
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 2, 2005
      Greetings,
      An insert looks real pretty and it will help to strengthen a nock
      (ash may be hard, but it still splits, it just takes a lot more to split
      it).
      I shoot self nocks very often and I haven't used the inserts (way
      too much work), but I wrap the
      area just under the cut nock with a tight whipping of synthetic sinew.
      There is a penetrating epoxy dip that is used in boatbuilding and
      boat maintenance that is available in most marine supply stores. It is
      used to strengthen wood used in frames and knees on boats and it
      essentially turns the wood into a hardened synthetic that is very
      durable. I experimented with it on a couple of dozen arrows and was
      pleased with the result. It comes in a clear, so it doesn't effect the
      look of the arrow and you only need to dip the nock (doing any more
      would undoubtedly affect the flex of the shaft). It's not that
      expensive, you mix the two parts together and it does penetrate the wood
      and hardens. I purchased a kit for under $20.00 and used very little of
      the kit to do the nocks on over two dozen arrows.
      Just another idea in the mix.
      -Geoffrei
    • Mark Hendershott
      I wrap my self nocked cedar shafts with thread and then paint them with water based polyurethane. Only ones I ve ever split were in the arrows made when I
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 2, 2005
        I wrap my self nocked cedar shafts with thread and then paint them with
        water based polyurethane. Only ones I've ever split were in the arrows
        made when I experimented with using a thin kerf tablesaw blade to cut the nock.

        Simon Sinneghe
        Briaroak, Summits, An Tir

        At 10:49 PM 4/2/2005, Geoffrei wrote:

        >Greetings,
        > An insert looks real pretty and it will help to strengthen a nock
        >(ash may be hard, but it still splits, it just takes a lot more to split
        >it).
        > I shoot self nocks very often and I haven't used the inserts (way
        >too much work), but I wrap the
        >area just under the cut nock with a tight whipping of synthetic sinew.
        > There is a penetrating epoxy dip that is used in boatbuilding and
        >boat maintenance that is available in most marine supply stores. It is
        >used to strengthen wood used in frames and knees on boats and it
        >essentially turns the wood into a hardened synthetic that is very
        >durable. I experimented with it on a couple of dozen arrows and was
        >pleased with the result. It comes in a clear, so it doesn't effect the
        >look of the arrow and you only need to dip the nock (doing any more
        >would undoubtedly affect the flex of the shaft). It's not that
        >expensive, you mix the two parts together and it does penetrate the wood
        >and hardens. I purchased a kit for under $20.00 and used very little of
        >the kit to do the nocks on over two dozen arrows.
        >Just another idea in the mix.
        >-Geoffrei
        >
        >
      • Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
        Subject: self nock question In making a self nocked arrow out of an ash shaft, is there any advantage in placing a horn or hardwood insert as you would do with
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 3, 2005
          Subject: self nock question

          In making a self nocked arrow out of an ash shaft, is there any
          advantage in placing a horn or hardwood insert as you would do with a
          cedar shaft?

          Many Thanks: Richard of Westwood


          As has been said, ash is pretty tough but the inserts do add strength and are asthetically pleasing also.

          A wood insert is probably easier to work with than a horn insert.

          I use black walnut inserts on all my personal cedar and ash shafts, and will use them on my future poplar shafts :)


          Godwin
        • Seán Moore
          Dear All, I use horn inserts on my period shafts and my Standard Arrows. There is a horn company in Scotland called Hillend Horn Company, details below, and
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 4, 2005
            Dear All,

            I use horn inserts on my period shafts and my Standard Arrows. There is a
            horn company in Scotland called Hillend Horn Company, details below, and
            they supply horn inserts, 3 inch by 1 inch and approximately 2mm thick, you
            can get a bag for a few pounds sterling and they go a long way, and cover
            most options for inserts.
            I use 24 hour epoxy because it too penetrates the wood and gives a very
            secure nock.
            The inserts do make the arrows more durable and will take more abuse, they
            also look well when finished off properly.
            If shooting the BLBS Standard Arrow, horn inserts are required.

            Whilst it may be a lot of work, we all spend a lot of time and effort on our
            kit, usually a lot more than we sometimes care to admit, but I will admit
            that it is worth it.

            Se�n the Archer

            ... . .- -. -- --- --- .-. .
            Ad Astra Per Aspera - Semper Exploro


            Details for Hillend:

            The Hillend Horn Company Ltd
            85 Hillend Road,
            Clarkston,
            Glasgow G76 7XT Scotland
            Tel (+44) 141 639 5735
            Fax (+44) 141 616 3522
            Email: hillhornco@...

            Contact: Martin Hyslop
            Martin is one of the leading UK suppliers of buffalo and rams horn, stag
            antler, seasoned shanks and other stickmaking materials, he also has horn
            for making asiatic composite bows.
          • Carl West
            ... I assume you run the grain of the insert cross-wise to the arrow. Yes? -- Fritz Carl West mailto:carl.west@comcast.net http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
            Message 5 of 6 , Apr 5, 2005
              Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil wrote:
              > ...
              > A wood insert is probably easier to work with than a horn insert.
              >
              > I use black walnut inserts on all my personal cedar and ash shafts, and will use them on my future poplar shafts :)

              I assume you run the grain of the insert cross-wise to the arrow. Yes?


              -- Fritz

              Carl West
              mailto:carl.west@...
              http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
              ----------------------------------
              Thinking outside the box - Good
              Pooping outside the box - Bad
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