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Re: [SCA-Archery] Crossbow Inspection Criteria

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  • James Koch
    Nigel, ... This following is actually a good point and it had me stumped for a while for an answer that made sense in terms of physics. ... Misfires and
    Message 1 of 39 , Mar 1, 2005
      Nigel,
      >
      This following is actually a good point and it had me stumped for a while
      for an answer that made sense in terms of physics.


      > I have been taught, and believe, that string that sets too far above
      > the surface will be prone to misfires, and rollovers. If that isn't
      > corrected, I would imagine the the structural integrity of the crossbow
      > would gradually become compromised, being subject to what would be in
      > effect a series of dry-firings. I regard this as a safety issue, since a
      > damaged crossbow is likely to behave erratically and eventually in a
      > dangerous fashion. I do agree that a small amount of float is not
      > hazardous and, in fact, can be an advantage in providing no surface
      > friction. The question then becomes "how much is too much?"

      Misfires and rollovers are a problem, but I experienced them with my old
      crossbow when my lock turned too slowly due to swelling of the wood from
      the effects of humidity. That bow had plenty of string drag. My new bow
      has little string drag, but my new lock gives no bad releases, so the
      energy stored is transferred into the bolts. The only way you will know if
      you have bad releases is to shoot the bow. This is therefore a line
      marshals concern and cannot be accurately predicted by the inspecting
      marshal. I'd definitely say string pressure on the rails shouldn't be a
      concern of the inspecting marshal.


      > > >b. with "loose" prods
      >
      > I have had personal experience with this, as Master Cunningham can
      > testify, since he is the one who repaired the bow. A loose prod, if not
      > otherwise anchored, is liable to begin slipping off it's mountings. As
      > the prod gradually edges further afield, misalignment occurs, and the bow
      > begins shooting, first inaccurately and then erratically. I regard that
      > as a safety issue. Again, a prod showing a certain amount of flexibility
      > is not a problem per se, but there is in my mind a distinct difference
      > between liberness or flexibility on the one hand, and looseness or
      > slippage on the other.

      As I stated earlier, what you are really trying to assure here is that the
      prod will not slip. So simply try to move the prod from side to side
      relative to the binding. If it slips and you think this will cause a
      problem, wrap some duct tape around both sides of the prod where it
      protrudes from the binding. That will prevent the slippage. My guess is
      if you require zickers on all prods you will kill two birds with one
      stone. The zicker will prevent slippage so that the prods don't have to be
      bound so tightly and the less tightly bound prods will be much less of a
      breakage hazard. First because they will flex over more of their length
      and second if they do eventually break the zicker will take most of the
      damage. If the dangers associated with prod breakage can be greatly
      reduced or eliminated, then bad releases are no longer a big concern.
      >
      Jim Koch (Gladius The Alchemist)
    • Brad Boda d'Aylward
      Snapped into two pieces. Brad Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Crossbow Inspection Criteria
      Message 39 of 39 , Mar 11, 2005
        Snapped into two pieces.

        Brad


        Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Crossbow Inspection Criteria


        >
        >Did it "explode" into several pieces or did it break into two pieces?
        >
        >Jon
        >
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