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Need some advice and help

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  • i_griffen
    Greetings to the Archers of the list. I am Ian Griffen the Archer of the Kingdom of Atenveldt. I have been lurking for several months. I shoot a longbow that
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 18, 2005
      Greetings to the Archers of the list.

      I am Ian Griffen the Archer of the Kingdom of Atenveldt. I have
      been lurking for several months.

      I shoot a longbow that has been scaled at 48lbs @ 28" my draw length
      is 26". I thought my draw length was at 28". When I buy new shafts
      what would be the best diameter and spine weight?

      Also at Christmas one of my neighbors gave me some turkey feathers.
      What will I have to do to these feathers so I can use them?


      Ian Griffen
    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
      The best diameter and spine weight are the ones that work best with the bow. Do the arrows you have been shooting work well? If so get the same. Any archery
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 19, 2005
        The best diameter and spine weight are the ones that work best with the bow.
        Do the arrows you have been shooting work well? If so get the same. Any
        archery shop worth it's salt can measure the diameter and spine weight of an
        arrow or you can do it your self. The diameter is easy(use a measuring
        instument) the spine is based on how much the arrow bends when you hang a
        2LB weight in the middle of 26 inch span. Measure your old arrows then get
        new arrows that match. Is you longbow and American or English longbow(with
        cutout rest or not) is fiberglass or wood?. My guess is that your wood
        english longbow will like arrows spined 45lb 11/32 shafts 100-125 grain tips
        your American fiberglass cutout longbow will like the 45-50 lb spine 11/32
        with the 100 grain tips. If you can barrow a few an try them out you can
        make up your own mind which works best. If they fish tale a lot going to the
        target get bigger feathers. I will let the fletchers in the group get you
        started on striping out flechings from the turkey feathers.

        Again it is the what works best with your bow.

        James Cunningham
        >
        >
        > Greetings to the Archers of the list.
        >
        > I am Ian Griffen the Archer of the Kingdom of Atenveldt. I have
        > been lurking for several months.
        >
        > I shoot a longbow that has been scaled at 48lbs @ 28" my draw length
        > is 26". I thought my draw length was at 28". When I buy new shafts
        > what would be the best diameter and spine weight?
        >
        > Also at Christmas one of my neighbors gave me some turkey feathers.
        > What will I have to do to these feathers so I can use them?
        >
        >
        > Ian Griffen
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Lord Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
        ... Ian, I would say 11/32 shafts would be what you would want to shoot, and the length about 1 to 1.5 inches longer than your draw. I draw at about 28, and I
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 19, 2005
          >
          >Greetings to the Archers of the list.
          >
          >I am Ian Griffen the Archer of the Kingdom of Atenveldt. I have
          >been lurking for several months.
          >
          >I shoot a longbow that has been scaled at 48lbs @ 28" my draw length
          >is 26". I thought my draw length was at 28". When I buy new shafts
          >what would be the best diameter and spine weight?
          >
          >Also at Christmas one of my neighbors gave me some turkey feathers.
          >What will I have to do to these feathers so I can use them?
          >
          >
          >Ian Griffen

          Ian,

          I would say 11/32 shafts would be what you would want to shoot, and the length about 1 to 1.5 inches longer
          than your draw. I draw at about 28, and I shoot 29.5 inch arrows. This way when I'm at full draw, the arrow
          is where the bottom edge of the point would just be touching my finger.

          My 60lb hickory backed ELB seems to like 57 spine arrows. My 60lb american longbow likes 60-65 spine arrows.
          The difference between the two as far as arrow spine, is because the ELB has no cut-in shelf, but the
          american LB does. The ELB also likes the shafts a little towards the heavy end. I'm going to try some Sitka
          Spruce shafts to see if it likes them better than the PO cedar that I sorted.
          I would get some friends together that have arrow lengths that would work for you, and try shooting from 40
          to 50 spine arrows and have someone watch behind you for any fishtailing.

          I have not prepped raw feathers as yet, so I can't give much advice there, but would also be very
          interested in whatever info others can give. I plan to process some raw feathers this year.

          Godwin
        • Ben Reeder
          I think I ll only be adding to what has been already said here, but it s worth weighing in on. As far as spine weight for your shafts, the spine weight, as far
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 19, 2005
            I think I'll only be adding to what has been already said here, but it's worth weighing in on.
            As far as spine weight for your shafts, the spine weight, as far as I've been given to understand, is supposed to be close to the draw weight of your bow, and as we've seen here, a little wiggle room there makes for more pleasing performance. So, given that your bow draws at 48#, my guess would be 40-45# spined shafts with 11/32 dia. As far as your draw length is concerned, I would have to reflect again what has been recommended before, make it slightly longer than your draw, mostly for safety sake.
            As far as processing raw feathers into useful fletching vanes, aside from cutting the vane from the feather, there is also the need to cut the vane down a bit into a good flight shape. You can purchase either a feather cutter or a burner from most on line archery suppliers, but the burner is going to cost you more. A raw feather glued to the shaft is going to give you more drag in the air & coming off the bow, which is why I tend to think they don't last as long as cut vanes. Besides, it slows your arrow down in flight, which makes your shot less flat. That may not make as much difference in the slightly heavier pull ranges, but for a 30# bow, like I use, I need every advantage I can get! Anyway, I hope this helps!




            Greetings to the Archers of the list.

            I am Ian Griffen the Archer of the Kingdom of Atenveldt. I have
            been lurking for several months.

            I shoot a longbow that has been scaled at 48lbs @ 28" my draw length
            is 26". I thought my draw length was at 28". When I buy new shafts
            what would be the best diameter and spine weight?





            Also at Christmas one of my neighbors gave me some turkey feathers.
            What will I have to do to these feathers so I can use them?


            Ian Griffen





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          • jrosswebb1@webtv.net
            Greetings, Unfortunately, the way of finding the optimum spine weight of arrows is not as cut and dried as simply measung on a spine scale. That is what you
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 21, 2005
              Greetings,
              Unfortunately, the way of finding the optimum spine weight of
              arrows is not as "cut and dried" as simply measung on a spine scale.
              That is what you do once you have found the correct arrows that shoot
              well out of your bow and you wish to make or purchase additional arrows.
              There are a lot of variables involved in getting the correct spine
              weight. When you shorten an arrow, you make it flex less, therefore, for
              all intents and purposes, you have raised the spine weight. The reverse
              is true when you leave the arrow longer. We measure the deflection of
              the shaft by placing a 2lb weight on it supported by two braces set 26"
              apart, but the reading is based on a shaft that is 28" long. (confused
              yet?) Uncut arrow shafts are sold 32" long, so if you have a 31" draw
              length and you've made up arrows that are spined at 48#, the actual
              arrows will be acting as if they are spined for 36#.
              If your draw length is 26" and you make your arrows up that length from
              shafts spined at 48#, they will act as arrows that are spined at 56#.
              The speed of your bow has a lot to do with it as well. A very fast
              bow makes the arrow bend faster on release and you may need a stiffer
              shaft.
              A true "period" bow with no center shot (where you are shooting
              off of your knuckle) likes a slightly under-spined arrow so that it
              won't slap as it bends around the bow.
              A heavier head on the arrow make the shaft respond as if it is
              spined lower.
              So the answer is: Go shoot a lot of different arrows out of yor
              bow spined at diffrent spine weights(within reason) and see which one
              performs the best. Then take that arrow that performs the best and
              measure it (spine weight, length, weight of tips, size and type of
              fletching, overall grain weight of arrow) write all of that information
              down and have arrows made to match those specs. Then you MAY have a good
              set of arrows for the bow. I guarantee that you will continue to tweek
              these specs as you continue shooting (your form may change, your release
              improve,etc.) and those wonderful arrows that you have won't shoot as
              well.
              Also LEARN how to straighten arrows. This is probably one of the
              most important issues an archer can learn once you've mastered the
              basics. Arrows bend and then they don't shoot well. You have to learn to
              bend them back straight otherwise you'll think your shooting has gone
              into the garbage and you won't know what you were doing wrong. After a
              period of time arrows get "tired" and have to be replaced, They get
              mushy, the spine drops and they won't shoot well even if they pass
              inspection. Pull the points off and discard the arrow, they've served
              you well.
              Good luck.
              -Geoffrei
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