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RE: [SCA-Archery] Re: Points & "proof" - hardening

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  • Talmon Parker
    Along the line of case hardening metal there was a method that was used in the early match lock weapons. Where the parts that was subject to wear were or for
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 15, 2005
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      Along the line of case hardening metal there was a method that was used
      in the early match lock weapons. Where the parts that was subject to wear
      were or for apearance were color case hardned. This was done by finishing
      the part to final polish, then putting t inside a metal tube with scraps of
      leather charcoal dust and sulfur powder. This was placed in the forge or a
      annealing fire and heated to a cherry red, then allowed to cool to the
      touch.The leather as it burned would give off enough carbon to put a thin
      coat of case hardning on the other pieces the sulfur would give a greenish
      blue cast to the color. This case hardening was difficult to file, but
      could be polished off.
      I have seen this effect on several older guns in museams during my mispent
      days as a ronde viewer
      of sorts.

      DER BARON




      >From: Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil <archergodwin@...>
      >Reply-To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Points & "proof" - hardening
      >Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2005 11:01:37 -0700
      >
      >
      >Well, the evidence seems to indicate that the base material used in
      >
      > >bodkin points was iron... so hardening, even case-hardening,
      > >wouldn't be possible using convential heat treat means.
      > >
      > >HOWEVER, the Italians used a technique where iron armour could be
      > >case hardened by placing it in a crucible with carbon powder and
      > >cooking it. This essentially created a harder layer of steel on the
      > >surface and a soft iron core.
      > >
      > >It is possible that such a technique could be used to create
      > >hardened bodkins. It even makes sense.
      > >
      > >BUT, there is no eivdence (yet) that is was done.
      > >
      > >Michael
      > >
      > >
      >It is entirely possible, that depending on what they fired their forges
      >with, that they were imparting a small amount of case hardening to the
      >points without realizing it.
      >My mind tells me if you fire your forge with coal, or charcoal and lay
      >the metal in it, then you are going to impart some carbon to the iron.
      >Repeated heating and hammering would, in my mind, impart some case
      >hardening to it.
      >
      >Interesting point might be if the bodkins and the armor plate were made
      >from basically the same iron, and whether or not the plate was subjected
      >to the same contact with carbon containing materials. I would think that
      >the methods to produce the two might be a bit different. Therefore, you
      >would wind up with a metal point that could indeed pierce the plate. The
      >fact that the bodkin is a chisel point, is instrumental in it's ability
      >to penetrate plate. If it were entirely round, it would be left to the
      >point to displace metal - or move the metal out of the way, which is a
      >much less efficient method of getting through the plate I would think.
      >
      >Godwin
      >
      >
      >
      >
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