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Blind Archer, take two.

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  • Al T
    A few weeks ago there was a discussion on this list about the feasability of the visually impaired participating in archery. Well, in my usual habit of being
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 8, 2005
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      A few weeks ago there was a discussion on this list about the
      feasability of the visually impaired participating in archery. Well,
      in my usual habit of being very late to chime in with anything, I
      found an article from the June/July '04 issue of State Archers of
      California Times. Jaice Waith is a blind person and wanted to share
      her husband's sport of archery.

      She writes:
      "I searched the internet for any information I could find regarding
      blind individuals who shoot archery. I could not find anything in
      the US, but discovered that it has become quite popular in Europe.
      "I contacted British Blind Sports who forwarded me some information
      on their technique.
      "Basically archers who can see the target use bow sights, but
      archers who cannot see the target use tactile sighting aids."

      The technique she learned involves the use of a modified tripod with
      an adjustable pressure button as a sight marker. The tripod also
      includes foot markers to provide proper body alignment for the
      pressure button. The archer stands with both feet touching the foot
      markers and aims by placing the back of the hand against the pressure
      button. The pressure button can be adjusted horizontally for windage
      and vertically for yardage. A spotter watches her shoot and calls
      the position of each shot, allowing her to make adjustments.

      The British Blind Sports organization webpage is at
      http://www.britishblindsport.org.uk/archery.htm

      Thus have I seen, er, found...
      -Allan Bluehood-
    • Talmon Parker
      HUZZAH!!! Thanks Allen , from us that have to use different means to do the same things. Baron Talmon DER BARON
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 8, 2005
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        HUZZAH!!!
        Thanks Allen , from us that have to use different means to do the same
        things.


        Baron Talmon



        DER BARON




        >From: "Al T" <abluehood@...>
        >Reply-To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        >To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [SCA-Archery] Blind Archer, take two.
        >Date: Sat, 08 Jan 2005 19:17:25 -0000
        >
        >
        >
        >A few weeks ago there was a discussion on this list about the
        >feasability of the visually impaired participating in archery. Well,
        >in my usual habit of being very late to chime in with anything, I
        >found an article from the June/July '04 issue of State Archers of
        >California Times. Jaice Waith is a blind person and wanted to share
        >her husband's sport of archery.
        >
        >She writes:
        > "I searched the internet for any information I could find regarding
        >blind individuals who shoot archery. I could not find anything in
        >the US, but discovered that it has become quite popular in Europe.
        > "I contacted British Blind Sports who forwarded me some information
        >on their technique.
        > "Basically archers who can see the target use bow sights, but
        >archers who cannot see the target use tactile sighting aids."
        >
        >The technique she learned involves the use of a modified tripod with
        >an adjustable pressure button as a sight marker. The tripod also
        >includes foot markers to provide proper body alignment for the
        >pressure button. The archer stands with both feet touching the foot
        >markers and aims by placing the back of the hand against the pressure
        >button. The pressure button can be adjusted horizontally for windage
        >and vertically for yardage. A spotter watches her shoot and calls
        >the position of each shot, allowing her to make adjustments.
        >
        >The British Blind Sports organization webpage is at
        >http://www.britishblindsport.org.uk/archery.htm
        >
        >Thus have I seen, er, found...
        > -Allan Bluehood-
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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        >Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
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        >[Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
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      • Sol
        ... Thank you for posting this followup, despite the time lapse since the original discussion. I end up posting very little because I m too slow to be part of
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 15, 2005
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          --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Al T" <abluehood@j...> wrote:
          >
          > A few weeks ago there was a discussion on this list about the
          > feasability of the visually impaired participating in archery. Well,
          > in my usual habit of being very late to chime in with anything, I
          > found an article from the June/July '04 issue of State Archers of
          > California Times. Jaice Waith is a blind person and wanted to share
          > her husband's sport of archery.

          Thank you for posting this followup, despite the time lapse since the
          original discussion. I end up posting very little because I'm too
          slow to be part of the discussion before the list moves onto something
          else. It is very interesting and I will look for the article.

          Thank you everyone in the original discussion regarding ways to help a
          vision-impaired novice archer. I think I like the idea of the
          noisemaker specifically engineered for navigation during sporting
          activities like baseball. Presumably it will be durable and effective
          in open air conditions, and will hopefully work in a large, echoing
          indoor setting full of multiple noise sources. I think with someone
          standing by to report the results of his efforts (sort of a verbal
          flagger), he can learn to self correct and hit the target until he can
          shoot independently. Combined with the tactile sighting system, I
          think this would be very effective. Wouldn't it be nice if there was
          some miniature noisemaker that could be added to the arrows without
          affecting their flight characteristics so he can retrieve them too.
          Now I just need to convince the gentleman to come back and try again.

          I apreciated all of the input.

          Sol
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