Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Arrow Length

Expand Messages
  • Galen of Ockham, MC, OP
    What s the recommended arrow length? The arrows I currently have for my longbow are cut to my drawlength, but recently I had someone tell me they should be
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 27, 2004
      What's the recommended arrow length? The arrows I currently have for my
      longbow are cut to my drawlength, but recently I had someone tell me they
      should be drawlength + 4 inches.

      In Service to Physick and Chirurgy,
      Galen

      Friar Galen of Ockham, MC, OP
      Chirurgeon's Point: http://www.chirurgeon.org
    • Guy Taylor
      Arrow length is up to the archer. Many hunters like the arrow length such that at full draw the back of the broadhead touches their finger, making a simple
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 27, 2004
        Arrow length is up to the archer.
        Many hunters like the arrow length such that at full draw the back
        of the broadhead touches their finger, making a simple draw check.
        Many novices like arrows extra long so they can be re-tipped one or
        more times after breaking the tip on a target frame or other
        unfriendly object. You generally want the arrows long that they
        will not be overdrawn at full draw. Shooting the arrow into the
        back of the bow or into the bow hand does not give good scores
        unless the paramedics have some kind of system to rate injuries.
        Keep in mind that arrow length affects the dynamic spine of the
        arrow. Drawn to the same length in the same bow, a 27" arrow will
        need to be a different spine than a 30" arrow (for best results,
        anyway).

        Guy

        --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Galen of Ockham, MC, OP"
        <brandt@i...> wrote:
        > What's the recommended arrow length? The arrows I currently have
        for my
        > longbow are cut to my drawlength, but recently I had someone tell
        me they
        > should be drawlength + 4 inches.
        >
        > In Service to Physick and Chirurgy,
        > Galen
        >
        > Friar Galen of Ockham, MC, OP
        > Chirurgeon's Point: http://www.chirurgeon.org
      • Bruce R. Gordon
        Greetings There is something of an advantage to keeping your arrows as short as they can be while still being safe - but, there are a number of archers who
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 28, 2004
          Greetings
          There is something of an advantage to keeping your arrows as short
          as they can be while still being safe - but, there are a number of
          archers who would disagree with that. A lot depends on your personal
          style, and what seems to work best for you.
          Here are the issues:
          1). Arrows need to be a certain minimum length, which is equal to
          drawlength plus a noodge or two. Why? Because if they are too short,
          and you happen to overdraw a bit, you end up with a potential for an...
          um, extremely interesting and dramatically random shot as the arrow
          wanders inside and around the bow. You might end up shooting your own
          bow, which makes an amazing sound as the arrow explodes into splinters.
          In front of your face. So, bottom line is, drawlength plus a few inches.
          2). Why not much, much longer? Well, some archers feel that the
          shorter the arrow, the lighter the arrow, the farther the cast for
          poundage expended. And they also note that very long arrows will tend
          to porpoise or fishtail more in flight. But, others will note that a
          longer arrow means a heavier arrow means a more stable arrow in flight.
          So go figure.
          In period, they used "clothyard" shafts, which probably weren't 36
          inches but more like 29 to 32. But they deliberately overdraw to their
          chests, so they needed the extra length. And they wanted heavier, more
          massive missiles, to penetrate deeper.
          So it ends up to what I said at the beginning, drawlength plus
          enough extra to be safe, and after that, whatever seems to be best for
          your kind of shooting style.

          Cordially;
          Nigel

          >
          > What's the recommended arrow length? The arrows I currently have for
          my
          > longbow are cut to my drawlength, but recently I had someone tell me
          they
          > should be drawlength + 4 inches.
          >
          > In Service to Physick and Chirurgy,
          > Galen
          >
          > Friar Galen of Ockham, MC, OP
          > Chirurgeon's Point: http://www.chirurgeon.org
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---8<---------------------------------------------
          > Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
          > Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
          >
          > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          --
          Three things never heard from the mouth of a Celt:
          "Do these colors match?"
          "Is this too much jewelry?"
          "Is that my drink?"

          http://web.raex.com/~obsidian/index.html
        • Godwin FitzGilbert de Strigoil
          On arrow length, you need to consider your draw length, the spine weight of the arrow and maintaining the proper FOC (front of center) position for the
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 29, 2004
            On arrow length, you need to consider your draw length, the spine weight
            of the arrow and maintaining the proper FOC (front of center) position
            for the combination of shaft weight and point weight.

            I believe there was some postings about FOC here in the last month or so...

            For myself, my arrows are set in length to allow full draw with only the
            point protruding (draw length + 1.5 inches) is what I cut my arrow to. I
            don't remember off the top of my head what my FOC is, but I can
            re-measure and find out.

            Godwin
          • Lord Caedmon Wilson
            I made the shire s loaner arrows at the full shaft length, 31 after Woodchucking the ends for the points and nocks. I did this mostly so that when a tip broke
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 29, 2004
              I made the shire's loaner arrows at the full shaft length, 31" after
              Woodchucking the ends for the points and nocks.

              I did this mostly so that when a tip broke off, I had a good chance of
              salvaging the arrow by just making it shorter, if the break was clean.

              At 31", the arrows fly fine and straight off the loaner recurves.

              --
              Lord Caedmon Wilson

              Crossbow Archery Champion, Barony Flaming Gryhon
              Rapier Champion, South Oaken Region
            • Paul O'Brien
              HI, Reminder if you re using shorter arrows this also can affect your section of spine weight of the shafts. The shorter the arrow the little the spine weight
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 29, 2004
                HI,
                Reminder if you're using shorter arrows this also can affect your section of
                spine weight of the shafts. The shorter the arrow the little the spine
                weight needs to be. There is not danger in using too heavy a weight but be
                prepared for you arrows to go left (if your right handed). Most supplies
                can help you with your section of shaft. A good guide for longbows is the
                weight of the bow and subtracts 15lbs. Help this helps in some way.

                Paul

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Guy Taylor [mailto:greytaylor@...]
                Sent: 28 December 2004 05:50
                Subject: [SCA-Archery] Re: Arrow Length

                Arrow length is up to the archer.
                Many hunters like the arrow length such that at full draw the back
                of the broadhead touches their finger, making a simple draw check.
                Many novices like arrows extra long so they can be re-tipped one or
                more times after breaking the tip on a target frame or other
                unfriendly object. You generally want the arrows long that they
                will not be overdrawn at full draw. Shooting the arrow into the
                back of the bow or into the bow hand does not give good scores
                unless the paramedics have some kind of system to rate injuries.
                Keep in mind that arrow length affects the dynamic spine of the
                arrow. Drawn to the same length in the same bow, a 27" arrow will
                need to be a different spine than a 30" arrow (for best results,
                anyway).

                Guy
              • Kinjal of Moravia
                Long arrows are only necessary if one s shooting style requires it. It is possible to pull the arrow to your cheekbone, chin or even chest as the Scythians
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 3, 2006
                  Long arrows are only necessary if one's shooting style requires it.
                  It is possible to pull the arrow to your cheekbone, chin or even chest
                  as the Scythians did. I have always been amused by dealers carrying
                  Scythian bows with a draw of 24-26" listed as children's bows. Not!
                  If you shoot 'fingers to the sky' and 'fist to chest', that is all the
                  draw you need.

                  Also, if one must shoot 36" arrows but complains of finger pinch and
                  stacking -- change to a bow like a static recurve which is designed to
                  pul 36-38" with no stack or pinch. Such complaints remind me of the
                  housewife who complained that she had to cut the ends off of roasts
                  because her pan was too small.

                  Kinjal
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.