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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Sources for the "surmises and assumptions"

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  • Mike O'Toole
    ... Thanks, I found that passage late last night. Unfortunately Featherstone doesn t give a source for this fact What I do recall is that there were two
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 19, 2004
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      Godwin fitzGilbert de Striguil wrote:

      >The Bowmen of England - Donald Featherstone. Pg. 48-50
      >
      >Specifically Pg 50, paragraph 2.
      >
      >"English archers carried into the field a sheaf of twenty-four barbed
      >arrows, buckled within their girdles. A portion of them, about six or
      >eight, were longer, lighter and winged with narrower feathers than the
      >rest. With these flight arrows, as they were called, they could hit a
      >mark at a greater distance than with the remaining heavy sheaf arrows.
      >The advantages occasionally derived from this superiority of range, when
      >directed by a skilful leader, have led to very important results such as
      >that at Towton. Unfledged arrows cannot fly far and are greatly affected
      >by the wind. Ascham, the 'Isaak Walton of archery', says 'Neither wood,
      >horn metal, parchment, paper nor cloth but only a feather is fit for a
      >shaft'. There must have been a great consumption of goose feathers; an
      >army needed at least 20000 sheaves of arrows, requiring a million and a
      >half goose feathers. Peacock feathers were used as well as those of the
      >grey goose."
      >
      >Godwin
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      Thanks, I found that passage late last night.

      Unfortunately Featherstone doesn't give a source for this 'fact'

      What I do recall is that there were two lengths of 'munitions grade'
      arrows on the Mary Rose. I believe Hardy explained it as shorter arrows
      for those archers with shorter draws. I don't know how Featherstone
      could deduce anything about the point and feathers considering the
      dearth of surviving intact medieval arrows.

      Michael O'Toole
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