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  • Frederick Fenters
    Since I get Digests, I tend to need to respond to several things at once. Sorry if that leads to any confusion, I ll try to be clear. 1) When judging
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 29, 2004
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      Since I get Digests, I tend to need to respond to several things at once. Sorry if that leads to any confusion, I'll try to be clear.

      1) When judging accuracy, that is in the shooter. Training to use one's weapon of choice is crucial. Having said that, I will also comment that the difference between shooting a hand bow (recurve or longbow) and a crossbow is analagous to the difference between shooting a pistol and a rifle.

      In either case, the weapon does the same thing the same way every time unless there is some sort of problem. The skill of the shooter is what makes the difference.

      A recurve is generally more forgiving of form and release problems than a longbow. Crossbow comes down to pure form and consistant sighting.

      2} To all the new people: ASK YOUR QUESTIONS!! I cannot overemphasize that. How else will you figure out (accurately) what the blankety blank is going on?

      3} Speed of loading. . . on average, crossbows will be slower to load than hand bows. I shoot a mundane Barnett, modified to meet SCA standards and am now (after much practice and a few tips from another crossbowman) averaging 5 shafts in a speed round. Caedmon and Robert both get more than that. THe weight of the prod (draw weight of the bow), practice, length of the draw, practice, placement of the shafts when preparing to shoot, practice, concentration, practice, and sometimes even the time of day can make a difference. Did I mention practice? Havenholde shooters have a sterling reputation and they practice speed shooting along with other stuff.

      4) Separating the styles. One thing that Forester Nigel and others have not mentioned is that a lot of good shooters will take themselves out of the running for prizes. Jarl Sir Tarquin the Red, Cirion the Left Handed and I generally stay out of prize competition locally, as we are all three several times members of the Kingdom Champions team at Pennsic and feel it unfair to the other shooters. We may have side bets among ourselves, but that's another story. We are all likely to be trying to teach a relatively new shooter from the line and just as excited when a new person makes a good shot or has an excellent round as for ourselves. That is one of the biggest things that makes a difference, in my mind. How the experienced shooters interact with the relative novices is the key. Master James is right about checking your crowd. What the shooters are using and advantages/disads of the different bows is less important to me than whether everyone had fun.

      To all and sundry who have beaten me in the past or will in the future, regardless of bow style, well done! To those I beat, let's have a rematch and we'll keep each other honest.

      To those who want to holler about unfair advantages, go practice and get back to me later. I'm busy having fun.

      Padraig MacRaighne
      He Who gets Long Winded out of a busted up carcass
      Forester of the Greenwood
      Pentamere Regional Archery Marshal

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ice Tiger
      ... Actually I think it s the standard style longbow that is more forgiving. Because of the efficiency and higher speed of most recurves the arrow has less
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 29, 2004
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        Frederick Fenters wrote:

        >A recurve is generally more forgiving of form and release problems than a longbow. Crossbow comes down to pure form and consistant sighting.
        >
        Actually I think it's the standard style longbow that is more forgiving.
        Because of the efficiency and higher speed of most recurves the arrow
        has less time to correct in flight.

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        >3} Speed of loading. . . on average, crossbows will be slower to load than hand bows. I shoot a mundane Barnett, modified to meet SCA standards and am now (after much practice and a few tips from another crossbowman) averaging 5 shafts in a speed round. Caedmon and Robert both get more than that. THe weight of the prod (draw weight of the bow), practice, length of the draw, practice, placement of the shafts when preparing to shoot, practice, concentration, practice, and sometimes even the time of day can make a difference. Did I mention practice? Havenholde shooters have a sterling reputation and they practice speed shooting along with other stuff.
        >
        With practice it's not uncommon to get eight off in a speed round. It
        all comes down to technique.
        Dalton

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