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Re: [poundage question

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  • Godwin fitzGilbert de Striguil
    ... I think you ll find that although the starting and ending poundage, (starting draw, end draw) are slightly different, you find the power under the curve is
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 2, 2004
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      > Message: 4
      > Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 22:33:02 -0000
      > From: "Jeff / Luminesce" <luminesce_duir@...>
      > Subject: poundage question
      >
      > When one twists the string to increase the brace height does it
      > increase the poundage as well?

      I think you'll find that although the starting and ending poundage,
      (starting draw, end draw) are slightly different, you find the power
      under the curve is about the same. It just plots out differently on a
      graph.

      The biggest advantage you'll get out of modifying your brace height, is
      reducing hand shock. Now I believe this directly relates to your arrow
      weight via how the power is applied to your arrow from the string.
      That's why you can modify your brace height and achieve a smoother
      shooting bow, for a given arrow.

      I have recently observed a very flat shooting bow, shooting 11/32 cedar
      shafts, where everyone of those shafts were coming off wild no matter
      what. When the arrow shot was increased to a 23/64, (not sure of the
      wood) which was a heavier arrow, it calmed right down, felt better and
      the arrow flew straighter.

      When shooting traditional, a lighter arrow is not necessarily better.
      Along with getting the FoC (front of center) and spine just right, and
      using as small a feather as possible to achieve stability, you need to
      match the arrow weight to the bow's power. I have heard that a good
      starting point is the x10 factor, which states a good place to start
      with arrow weight is 10 grains for every lb of bow pull. 50lb bow - 500
      grain arrow. For my recurve that holds true, but not so for my longbow.
      I have not found the "ideal" arrow yet for it. I am getting closer, and
      I have found the spine it likes to shoot, but not necessarily the weight.

      Godwin
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