Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Weighted Strings

Expand Messages
  • atruemark@aol.com
    A few years back, when I owned an archery shop that dealt primarily in modern archery equipment, it seemed as though everyone was interested in putting
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 15, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      A few years back, when I owned an archery shop that dealt primarily in modern
      archery equipment, it seemed as though everyone was interested in putting
      together the "hottest" archery setup possible for three-D shoots. Among the very
      many ways of getting the most speed out of the setup was to attach one, two
      or three of the rubberized nock sets about two inches above and below the cams
      on the main string of the bow. Those that did this swore that it increased
      their arrow speed and quoted chrono tests, etc.

      Tonight, in reading a recently acquired copy of "Saracen Archery" by J.D.
      Latham and W.F. Paterson, I ran across a 14th century reference to the same
      practice. On page 105 it's related, "He then showed me his bow, and I found two
      beads of lead on his bowstring." This line is an English translation of the
      original Aramaic text. In the commentary at the end of the translated section,
      the authors say, "It remains only to remark that although the two lead beads
      fitted to the bowstring would in fact fractionally retard it when loosed, both
      archers in questions - and probably other contemporaries - were probably under
      the mistaken impression that a little added weight was an advantage in that it
      gave greater thrust to the arrow." All of this was in relation to flight
      shooting.

      My question is this; do any of you have further information regarding adding
      small amounts of weight to the bowstring in an effort to achieve greater arrow
      speed?

      And my comment is this; is there anything about archery, other than
      materials, that hasn't been thought of before?

      Just food for discussion.

      Andras Truemark
      who highly, highly recommends this book


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Mike Wertz
      Physics of a compound and traditional bows are apples and oranges. You can get more speed by using a thinner kevlar string. Nissa Godrung once made me a kevlar
      Message 2 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        Physics of a compound and traditional bows are apples and oranges. You can
        get more speed by using a thinner kevlar string. Nissa Godrung once made me
        a kevlar flemish loop for a Martin Ml16 Custom longbow. A smaller diameter
        string offers less wind resistance. Kevlar strings can damage a bow (Urban
        legend) due to lack of stretch,bounce,whatever. If you are shooting a 35lb
        bow with a 16strand string , you are not tuned to your best advantage.
        Warning !!! Now somebody is going to load up their string with lead
        splitshot fishing weights and little lead meteorites are on their way. Bad
        idea.

        Now everybody go count your strands.

        TK




        At 02:35 AM 1/16/2004 -0500, you wrote:
        >A few years back, when I owned an archery shop that dealt primarily in modern
        >archery equipment, it seemed as though everyone was interested in putting
        >together the "hottest" archery setup possible for three-D shoots. Among
        >the very
        >many ways of getting the most speed out of the setup was to attach one, two
        >or three of the rubberized nock sets about two inches above and below the
        >cams
        >on the main string of the bow. Those that did this swore that it increased
        >their arrow speed and quoted chrono tests, etc.
        >
        >Tonight, in reading a recently acquired copy of "Saracen Archery" by J.D.
        >Latham and W.F. Paterson, I ran across a 14th century reference to the same
        >practice. On page 105 it's related, "He then showed me his bow, and I
        >found two
        >beads of lead on his bowstring." This line is an English translation of the
        >original Aramaic text. In the commentary at the end of the translated
        >section,
        >the authors say, "It remains only to remark that although the two lead beads
        >fitted to the bowstring would in fact fractionally retard it when loosed,
        >both
        >archers in questions - and probably other contemporaries - were probably
        >under
        >the mistaken impression that a little added weight was an advantage in
        >that it
        >gave greater thrust to the arrow." All of this was in relation to flight
        >shooting.
        >
        >My question is this; do any of you have further information regarding adding
        >small amounts of weight to the bowstring in an effort to achieve greater
        >arrow
        >speed?
        >
        >And my comment is this; is there anything about archery, other than
        >materials, that hasn't been thought of before?
        >
        >Just food for discussion.
        >
        >Andras Truemark
        >who highly, highly recommends this book
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >---8<---------------------------------------------
        >Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
        >Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
        >
        >[Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
        >
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >To visit your group on the web, go to:
        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/
        >
        >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
      • Carl West
        ... The strings I make for my 40# fiberglass longbow have 4 strands of B90 dacron for the main body, I put in reinforcements at the loop, nocking area, and
        Message 3 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
        • 0 Attachment
          Mike Wertz wrote:
          >
          >...
          > Now everybody go count your strands.

          The strings I make for my 40# fiberglass longbow have 4 strands of B90 dacron for the main body, I put in reinforcements at the loop, nocking area, and tail. Saves on material and string weight. I don't know of anyone I know having a chrono. That would be interesting.

          -- Fritz


          If you try to 'reply' to me without fixing the dot, your reply
          will go into a 'special' mailbox reserved for spam. See below.


          --
          Carl West carlDOTwest@... http://carl.west.home.comcast.net

          >>>>>>>> change the 'DOT' to '.' to email me <<<<<<<<<<<<

          If I had six hours to chop down a tree,
          I'd spend the first four sharpening the axe.
          - Abraham Lincoln
        • mwertz@fyi.net
          ... Is that a real bow or a sears bow?
          Message 4 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
          • 0 Attachment
            >
            Is that a real bow or a sears bow?





            Mike Wertz wrote:
            >>
            >>...
            >> Now everybody go count your strands.
            >
            > The strings I make for my 40# fiberglass longbow have 4 strands of B90
            > dacron for the main body, I put in reinforcements at the loop, nocking
            > area, and tail. Saves on material and string weight. I don't know of
            > anyone I know having a chrono. That would be interesting.
            >
            > -- Fritz
            >
            >
            > If you try to 'reply' to me without fixing the dot, your reply
            > will go into a 'special' mailbox reserved for spam. See below.
            >
            >
            > --
            > Carl West carlDOTwest@... http://carl.west.home.comcast.net
            >
            >>>>>>>>> change the 'DOT' to '.' to email me <<<<<<<<<<<<
            >
            > If I had six hours to chop down a tree,
            > I'd spend the first four sharpening the axe.
            > - Abraham Lincoln
            >
            > ---8<---------------------------------------------
            > Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
            > Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
            >
            > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            > To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
          • atruemark@aol.com
            In a message dated 1/16/04 4:08:14 AM Pacific Standard Time, mwertz@fyi.net writes: Kevlar strings can damage a bow (Urban legend) due to lack of
            Message 5 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
            • 0 Attachment
              In a message dated 1/16/04 4:08:14 AM Pacific Standard Time, mwertz@...
              writes:
              Kevlar strings can damage a bow (Urban
              legend) due to lack of stretch,bounce,whatever.
              I know for a fact that Kevlar strings can damage unreinforced traditional
              equipment. A friend generously offered to make me a string years back for a Hoyt
              target recurve I had. The second arrow shot resulted in total annihilation
              of the upper limb, as the string cut down through the shoulders of the string
              guide and split the limb into three long sections. No Urban Legend involved
              there, folks.

              Andras Truemark


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Mac Con mac Conaill
              Greetings to the list! Long has it been sence I post to this list but I have been lurkig :-) Lord Truemark, where can one get a copy? atruemark@aol.com wrote:
              Message 6 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
              • 0 Attachment
                Greetings to the list! Long has it been sence I post to this list but I have been lurkig :-)

                Lord Truemark, where can one get a copy?

                atruemark@... wrote:
                A few years back, when I owned an archery shop that dealt primarily in modern
                archery equipment, it seemed as though everyone was interested in putting
                together the "hottest" archery setup possible for three-D shoots. Among the very
                many ways of getting the most speed out of the setup was to attach one, two
                or three of the rubberized nock sets about two inches above and below the cams
                on the main string of the bow. Those that did this swore that it increased
                their arrow speed and quoted chrono tests, etc.

                Tonight, in reading a recently acquired copy of "Saracen Archery" by J.D.
                Latham and W.F. Paterson, I ran across a 14th century reference to the same
                practice. On page 105 it's related, "He then showed me his bow, and I found two
                beads of lead on his bowstring." This line is an English translation of the
                original Aramaic text. In the commentary at the end of the translated section,
                the authors say, "It remains only to remark that although the two lead beads
                fitted to the bowstring would in fact fractionally retard it when loosed, both
                archers in questions - and probably other contemporaries - were probably under
                the mistaken impression that a little added weight was an advantage in that it
                gave greater thrust to the arrow." All of this was in relation to flight
                shooting.

                My question is this; do any of you have further information regarding adding
                small amounts of weight to the bowstring in an effort to achieve greater arrow
                speed?

                And my comment is this; is there anything about archery, other than
                materials, that hasn't been thought of before?

                Just food for discussion.

                Andras Truemark
                who highly, highly recommends this book


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                ---8<---------------------------------------------
                Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
                Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/

                [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]


                Yahoo! Groups Links

                To visit your group on the web, go to:
                http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/

                To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                Yours in Service;

                Tighearn Mac Con mac Conaill of Clan Donald

                As long as but a hundred of us remain alive, never will we on any conditions be brought under English rule. It is in truth not for glory, nor riches, nor honours, that we are fighting, but for freedom - for that alone, which no honest man gives up but with life itself.

                Declaration of Arbroath, 6 April 1320.




                ---------------------------------
                Do you Yahoo!?
                Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • atruemark@aol.com
                In a message dated 1/16/04 11:03:46 AM Pacific Standard Time, mac_con_mac_conaill@yahoo.com writes: Lord Truemark, where can one get a copy? Ah, therein lies
                Message 7 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
                • 0 Attachment
                  In a message dated 1/16/04 11:03:46 AM Pacific Standard Time,
                  mac_con_mac_conaill@... writes:
                  Lord Truemark, where can one get a copy?
                  Ah, therein lies the rub. This book is out of print and very hard to find.
                  The copy I'm reading is on interlibrary loan and must be returned next week
                  (sounds of great frustration). I have been looking for several years for a copy
                  of my own. I bought a copy written in Turkish (go figure), but now that I've
                  actually read the book I'm willing to pay the price to own it. It's amazing.

                  Details: Saracen Archery, an English Version and Exposition of a Mameluke
                  Work on Archery (ca. A.D. 1368) by J.D. Latham and W. F. Paterson, The Holland
                  Press, London, copywrite 1970. The Holland Press Ltd, 112 Whitfield St.,
                  London, W.1

                  Regards,

                  Andras Truemark


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • eulenhorst@juno.com
                  Not urban legend. I ve seen it happen with bows not designed for Kevlar (no longer available), FastFlite, and similar materials. Most bows made since the mid
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Not urban legend. I've seen it happen with bows not designed for Kevlar (no longer available), FastFlite, and similar materials. Most bows made since the mid '70's have been desined for these high efficiency string materials, however so there shouldn't be much danger in using them. For self bows, non-fibreglas or carbonglas bows, or other home builts stay with Dacron.


                    In Service to the dream
                    Carolus von Eulenhorst
                    eulenhorst@...

                    -- Mike Wertz <mwertz@...> wrote:
                    Physics of a compound and traditional bows are apples and oranges. You can
                    get more speed by using a thinner kevlar string. Nissa Godrung once made me
                    a kevlar flemish loop for a Martin Ml16 Custom longbow. A smaller diameter
                    string offers less wind resistance. Kevlar strings can damage a bow (Urban
                    legend) due to lack of stretch,bounce,whatever. If you are shooting a 35lb
                    bow with a 16strand string , you are not tuned to your best advantage.
                    Warning !!! Now somebody is going to load up their string with lead
                    splitshot fishing weights and little lead meteorites are on their way. Bad
                    idea.

                    Now everybody go count your strands.

                    TK




                    At 02:35 AM 1/16/2004 -0500, you wrote:
                    >A few years back, when I owned an archery shop that dealt primarily in modern
                    >archery equipment, it seemed as though everyone was interested in putting
                    >together the "hottest" archery setup possible for three-D shoots. Among
                    >the very
                    >many ways of getting the most speed out of the setup was to attach one, two
                    >or three of the rubberized nock sets about two inches above and below the
                    >cams
                    >on the main string of the bow. Those that did this swore that it increased
                    >their arrow speed and quoted chrono tests, etc.
                    >
                    >Tonight, in reading a recently acquired copy of "Saracen Archery" by J.D.
                    >Latham and W.F. Paterson, I ran across a 14th century reference to the same
                    >practice. On page 105 it's related, "He then showed me his bow, and I
                    >found two
                    >beads of lead on his bowstring." This line is an English translation of the
                    >original Aramaic text. In the commentary at the end of the translated
                    >section,
                    >the authors say, "It remains only to remark that although the two lead beads
                    >fitted to the bowstring would in fact fractionally retard it when loosed,
                    >both
                    >archers in questions - and probably other contemporaries - were probably
                    >under
                    >the mistaken impression that a little added weight was an advantage in
                    >that it
                    >gave greater thrust to the arrow." All of this was in relation to flight
                    >shooting.
                    >
                    >My question is this; do any of you have further information regarding adding
                    >small amounts of weight to the bowstring in an effort to achieve greater
                    >arrow
                    >speed?
                    >
                    >And my comment is this; is there anything about archery, other than
                    >materials, that hasn't been thought of before?
                    >
                    >Just food for discussion.
                    >
                    >Andras Truemark
                    >who highly, highly recommends this book
                    >
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >---8<---------------------------------------------
                    >Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
                    >Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/
                    >
                    >[Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
                    >
                    >
                    >Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/
                    >
                    >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    > SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                    > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    >



                    ---8<---------------------------------------------
                    Brought to you YahooGroups Ad Free in 2003 by Medieval Mart
                    Get Medieval at Mad Macsen's http://www.medievalmart.com/

                    [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]


                    Yahoo! Groups Links

                    To visit your group on the web, go to:
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SCA-Archery/

                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                    SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com

                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
                    http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                    ________________________________________________________________
                    The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
                    Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
                    Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!
                  • J. Hughes
                    Saracen Archery is a 1368 Mamluk treatise. I particularly like it because it documents very well the Islamic use of the crossbow which it treats extensively.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jan 16, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Saracen Archery is a 1368 Mamluk treatise. I
                      particularly like it because it documents very well
                      the Islamic use of the crossbow which it treats
                      extensively.

                      [OK, my copy is a xerox of an interlibrary loan, but
                      that works]

                      Charles O'Connor
                      --- atruemark@... wrote:
                      > Tonight, in reading a recently acquired copy of
                      > "Saracen Archery" by J.D.
                      > Latham and W.F. Paterson, I ran across a 14th
                      > century reference to the same
                      > practice. On page 105 it's related, "He then showed
                      > me his bow, and I found two
                      > beads of lead on his bowstring." This line is an
                      > English translation of the
                      > original Aramaic text. In the commentary at the end
                      > of the translated section,
                      > the authors say, "It remains only to remark that
                      > although the two lead beads
                      > fitted to the bowstring would in fact fractionally
                      > retard it when loosed, both
                      > archers in questions - and probably other
                      > contemporaries - were probably under
                      > the mistaken impression that a little added weight
                      > was an advantage in that it
                      > gave greater thrust to the arrow." All of this was
                      > in relation to flight
                      > shooting.
                      >
                      > My question is this; do any of you have further
                      > information regarding adding
                      > small amounts of weight to the bowstring in an
                      > effort to achieve greater arrow
                      > speed?
                      >
                      > And my comment is this; is there anything about
                      > archery, other than
                      > materials, that hasn't been thought of before?
                      >
                      > Just food for discussion.
                      >
                      > Andras Truemark
                      > who highly, highly recommends this book


                      __________________________________
                      Do you Yahoo!?
                      Yahoo! Hotjobs: Enter the "Signing Bonus" Sweepstakes
                      http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/signingbonus
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.