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Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Apache style

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  • Jross007@aol.com
    This may be a very bad reference, but I saw the same draw in a movie. (one of the more modern Marco Polo movies,1980s I think.) Marco was asking his guide and
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 24, 2003
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      This may be a very bad reference, but I saw the same draw in a movie.
      (one of the more modern Marco Polo movies,1980s I think.) Marco was asking his
      guide and friend (young man, dont remember the character) explain that "this"
      was the way the Mongols drew their bows. I have used it myself on occasion,
      with some amount of success.

      Eoin Maclulich

      > Yes, if I read your post correctly, it is a "push, pull draw" and is
      > taught by many NAA and Olympic coaches. The bow begins slightly above
      > or, preferably, below level and as it is brought horizontal the force is
      > divided between pushing with the bow arm and pulling with the back. I
      > often use it myself, particularly at longer ranges. It gives a much more
      > powerful draw.
      > Carolus
      >
      > On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 13:39:51 EDT blkknighti@... writes:
      > >You know I started thinking about my course when drawing after
      > >reading these
      > >posts.... I actually push the bow out and draw at the same time. My
      > >former
      > >coach, Len Cardinale liked that "thing" I did (having come to him
      > >after I was
      > >shooting a while) and I was sure what he meant. It was just very
      > >natural to me.
      > >Is there a name for this technique?
      > >Richard



      The esteemed ($&$&$#&!!) SM, John Ross


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dan Scheid
      ok from a horseman s point of view I would say Not likely to anchor on the cheek and push the bow way just does not lend it s self to galloping on and
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 24, 2003
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        ok from a horseman's point of view I would say Not likely to anchor on the
        cheek and push the bow way just does not lend it's self to galloping on and
        controlling of the horse.
        I think it is something someone came up with.It just is not a intuitive way
        to pull a bow.
        Damales
        "You ask a mare.
        You tell a gelding.
        You have a conversation with a stallion"
        Author unknown
        www.home.earthlink.net/~chevalvolant/flyinghorseforge.html
        >
        > This may be a very bad reference, but I saw the same draw in a
        movie.
        > (one of the more modern Marco Polo movies,1980s I think.) Marco was asking
        his
        > guide and friend (young man, dont remember the character) explain that
        "this"
        > was the way the Mongols drew their bows. I have used it myself on
        occasion,
        > with some amount of success.
        >
        > Eoin Maclulich
        >
        > > Yes, if I read your post correctly, it is a "push, pull draw" and is
        > > taught by many NAA and Olympic coaches. The bow begins slightly above
        > > or, preferably, below level and as it is brought horizontal the force is
        > > divided between pushing with the bow arm and pulling with the back. I
        > > often use it myself, particularly at longer ranges. It gives a much
        more
        > > powerful draw.
        > > Carolus
        > >
        > > On Fri, 24 Oct 2003 13:39:51 EDT blkknighti@... writes:
        > > >You know I started thinking about my course when drawing after
        > > >reading these
        > > >posts.... I actually push the bow out and draw at the same time. My
        > > >former
        > > >coach, Len Cardinale liked that "thing" I did (having come to him
        > > >after I was
        > > >shooting a while) and I was sure what he meant. It was just very
        > > >natural to me.
        > > >Is there a name for this technique?
        > > >Richard
        >
        >
        >
        > The esteemed ($&$&$#&!!) SM, John Ross
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
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      • Daniel Hawley
        I agree with Carolus here, but the G.N.A.S. have banned any draw where the bottom of the bowhand is above the top of the drawing hand (Unless you need to aim
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 25, 2003
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          I agree with Carolus here, but the G.N.A.S. have banned any draw
          where the bottom of the bowhand is above the top of the drawing hand
          (Unless you need to aim that high to hit the target, in which case
          you cannot aim above the target at any point) due to safety
          problems. Someone was drawing a bow with the "start above the head
          method" and loosed accidently, the arrow went beyond the overshoot.
          (English Longbows are exempt from this rule) I draw with the bow
          held down level with my waist and then push and pull to full draw. I
          believe that some Eastern cultures draw with both hands above the
          head, then push and pull down to anchor, but I am not an expert on
          these styles.

          Daniel

          > Yes, if I read your post correctly, it is a "push, pull draw" and
          is
          > taught by many NAA and Olympic coaches. The bow begins slightly
          above
          > or, preferably, below level and as it is brought horizontal the
          force is
          > divided between pushing with the bow arm and pulling with the
          back. I
          > often use it myself, particularly at longer ranges. It gives a
          much more
          > powerful draw.
          > Carolus
        • Michael Gardner
          I ve been reading these posts and I agree with the concensus. I learned bowmanship from a Native American bowman. The push/pull method can be documented in
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 29, 2003
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            I've been reading these posts and I agree with the concensus. I
            learned bowmanship from a Native American bowman. The push/pull method
            can be documented in most tribes throughout the US. If you think about
            Medieval longbows with 120# draws, it seems only obvious that a
            technique had to be devised to use that weapon that didn't include
            only one arm. A push/pull technique "feels" more natural once you get
            the rythem. I really think Hollywood put the one arm draw in our
            heads. Additionally, in my studies, few bowmen lower the bow to
            target, rather raise it as the draw is completed because, generally,
            the arrows were staged in the ground in front of them and this is a
            more efficient movement.

            Michael

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Daniel Hawley"
            <daniel_hawley@y...> wrote:
            > I agree with Carolus here, but the G.N.A.S. have banned any draw
            > where the bottom of the bowhand is above the top of the drawing hand
            > (Unless you need to aim that high to hit the target, in which case
            > you cannot aim above the target at any point) due to safety
            > problems. Someone was drawing a bow with the "start above the head
            > method" and loosed accidently, the arrow went beyond the overshoot.
            > (English Longbows are exempt from this rule) I draw with the bow
            > held down level with my waist and then push and pull to full draw. I
            > believe that some Eastern cultures draw with both hands above the
            > head, then push and pull down to anchor, but I am not an expert on
            > these styles.
            >
            > Daniel
            >
            > > Yes, if I read your post correctly, it is a "push, pull draw" and
            > is
            > > taught by many NAA and Olympic coaches. The bow begins slightly
            > above
            > > or, preferably, below level and as it is brought horizontal the
            > force is
            > > divided between pushing with the bow arm and pulling with the
            > back. I
            > > often use it myself, particularly at longer ranges. It gives a
            > much more
            > > powerful draw.
            > > Carolus
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