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Re: Siberian arrows

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  • Marko Peussa
    Hello, The museum session went quite well and we got some nice photos. We were in luck, because the storage arrows were not from Siberia, but from an area
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 24, 2003
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      Hello,

      The museum session went quite well and we got some nice photos. We
      were in luck, because the storage arrows were not from Siberia, but
      from an area around the Russian river Volga. That is, closer to
      Europe. The arrows were collected in the early 19th century, but were
      not in use at that time. They were kept as 'family memories'. Thus,
      it is possible that they are considerably older, perhaps from the end
      of 18th century.

      Some answers to questions:

      > Are the shafts made from solid(planned out of a board) or are they
      sprout or cane type shaft?

      Made by hand from solid wood, which looked like pine. One could make
      these arrows from pine planks. For blunts, quite thick plank is
      needed.

      >Are the shafts tapered in any way.

      Yes, they were all barreled.

      >The type of nock.

      Self nocks, in some cases reinforced with hemp or 'nokkonen' fibre
      wrappings. The nock was always thicker than the shaft.

      >tip

      Simple four-sided metal heads with tang, reinforced with hemp
      or 'nokkonen' fibre. Blunts were made out of wood or bone.

      >and Fletching?

      Looooong fletches, up to 25 cm long (10 inches). Looked like some
      water bird. The white stuff from the quill was removed before gluing.
      Three fletches, one of which is aligned to the nock groove, just like
      in Japanese arrows. This makes me wonder if they used the Mongolian
      draw. There is no written data how they actually shot.

      > What were they designed for target or hunting?

      All arrows are clearly hunting arrows. For example, blunts were used
      for rabbits and squirrels. Squirrel skins were still in use for
      currency in some remote areas in the end of 18th century. But, in
      order to hunt, one has to practice shooting, too. Probably they
      praticed with the same arrows that were used for hunting.

      That's it, I'll let you all know when I have the photos up.

      Regards,

      Klaus
    • James W. Pratt, Jr.
      Great work!! James Cunningham
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 24, 2003
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        Great work!!

        James Cunningham
        >
        > Some answers to questions:
        >
        > > Are the shafts made from solid(planned out of a board) or are they
        > sprout or cane type shaft?
        >
        > Made by hand from solid wood, which looked like pine. One could make
        > these arrows from pine planks. For blunts, quite thick plank is
        > needed.
        >
        > >Are the shafts tapered in any way.
        >
        > Yes, they were all barreled.
        >
        > >The type of nock.
        >
        > Self nocks, in some cases reinforced with hemp or 'nokkonen' fibre
        > wrappings. The nock was always thicker than the shaft.
        >
        > >tip
        >
        > Simple four-sided metal heads with tang, reinforced with hemp
        > or 'nokkonen' fibre. Blunts were made out of wood or bone.
        >
        > >and Fletching?
        >
        > Looooong fletches, up to 25 cm long (10 inches). Looked like some
        > water bird. The white stuff from the quill was removed before gluing.
        > Three fletches, one of which is aligned to the nock groove, just like
        > in Japanese arrows. This makes me wonder if they used the Mongolian
        > draw. There is no written data how they actually shot.
        >
        > > What were they designed for target or hunting?
        >
        > All arrows are clearly hunting arrows. For example, blunts were used
        > for rabbits and squirrels. Squirrel skins were still in use for
        > currency in some remote areas in the end of 18th century. But, in
        > order to hunt, one has to practice shooting, too. Probably they
        > praticed with the same arrows that were used for hunting.
        >
        > That's it, I'll let you all know when I have the photos up.
        >
        > Regards,
        >
        > Klaus
        >
      • Duncan Wallensis de Selkirk
        Am I right that the fletches are just glued and not tied on? Duncan ... gluing. ... like
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 25, 2003
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          Am I right that the fletches are just glued and not tied on?

          Duncan

          > >and Fletching?
          >
          > Looooong fletches, up to 25 cm long (10 inches). Looked like some
          > water bird. The white stuff from the quill was removed before
          gluing.
          > Three fletches, one of which is aligned to the nock groove, just
          like
          > in Japanese arrows. This makes me wonder if they used the Mongolian
          > draw. There is no written data how they actually shot.
          >
        • Marko Peussa
          They were glued and tied on, with 1-2 cm wrapping in the front and back of the fletch. The glue was fish glue. The wrappings were made of either hemp, or
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 25, 2003
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            They were glued and tied on, with 1-2 cm wrapping in the front and
            back of the fletch. The glue was fish glue. The wrappings were made
            of either hemp, or 'nokkonen' stingy plant fibres, we are not sure
            which. There was no spiral wrapping along the feather, as opposed to
            some of the old english arrows.

            Regards,

            Klaus

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Duncan Wallensis de Selkirk"
            <selkirk@m...> wrote:
            > Am I right that the fletches are just glued and not tied on?
            >
            > Duncan
            >
            > > >and Fletching?
            > >
            > > Looooong fletches, up to 25 cm long (10 inches). Looked like some
            > > water bird. The white stuff from the quill was removed before
            > gluing.
            > > Three fletches, one of which is aligned to the nock groove, just
            > like
            > > in Japanese arrows. This makes me wonder if they used the
            Mongolian
            > > draw. There is no written data how they actually shot.
            > >
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