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Re: [SCA-Archery] Digest Number 1402

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  • Frederick Fenters
    ... You wil want some manner of fletching clamp (more below), tapering tools for the various sizes of shafting you may use, some manner of sealer and dipping
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 31, 2003
      > Message: 1
      > Date: Fri, 29 Aug 2003 23:34:15 -0000
      > From: "kissijunk" <kissijunk@...>
      > Subject: Beggining Fletcher Needs Advice
      >
      > I would like to start fletching my own arrows and would greatly
      > appreciate some advice as to what equipment to buy. What are the
      > barebones equipment requirements?
      You wil want some manner of fletching clamp (more below), tapering tools for the various sizes of shafting you may use, some manner of sealer and dipping apparatus, and, of course, feathers.
      If I had a little more to spend,
      > what would be the best thing to splurge on?
      Put your money in the fletching jig first. Your Tapering Tool is the next place to put any extra money. Spend your money getting the best available equipment, even if you must plan on trading up at a latr date on something else.
      What kind of glue does
      > everyone use?
      I use Fletch tite for my feathers and nocks and Ferr-l-tite for points. They seem to give the best results. I have used Duce for the feathers with good success as well.
      Why is there such a wide range in price for taper
      > tools?
      Tapering Tools are priced by the cost of the manufacture and by the precision they provide. The Whiffen is a good starter tool and I carry the various sizes in my kit for field repairs. The Tru-Center is the one I use the most at home. It comes with the 3 common shaft collars included. A friend who fletches a lot for sale to SCA people has a woodchuck motorized tool and absolutely loves it.
      What fletching jig (?) should I get?
      Bitzenberger is the top of the line. I disagree about using the straight clamp, though. Helical clamps give a truer curve to the feather and thus work better in the long run (IMHO)
      Next after the Bitz. is one called the "Grayling". Both are available at Three Rivers. http://www.3riversarchery.com

      Where should I buy all
      > my equipment?
      Again, 3 Rivers is a good source for most all supplies.
      If anyone has answers to any of these questions, I
      > would be grateful for your help. Thanks a bunch.
      >
      Good luck. One piece of advice, watch closely that the full length of the feather touches the shaft before you start gluing.

      Padraig MacRaighne

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carolus Eulenhorst
      This is correct if you feathers are 4 log or longer or if you use 5 degree or greater offset on either side of the shaft centerline. I use 2 3/4 fletching
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 31, 2003
        This
        is correct if you feathers are 4" log or longer or if you use 5 degree
        or greater offset on either side of the shaft centerline. I use 2 3/4"
        fletching with 2.5 degree offset each side of the centerline (5 degree
        total). This gives me the balance and spin I want without adding excess
        drag. I find few archers beginning fletching to be using arrows which
        require that much correction and are looking for a low drag design. They
        also tend to experiment a lot with angles of attachment and direction of
        spin. Left or right spin require left or right helical clamps
        respectively. Which is why I recommend a straight clamp to start and the
        ability to add helicals.

        In service to the dream
        Carolus von Eulenhorst
        eulenhorst@...
        Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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        On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 19:33:43 -0400 "Frederick Fenters"
        <padraig@...> writes:
        >
        snip
        > Bitzenberger is the top of the line. I disagree about using the
        > straight clamp, though. Helical clamps give a truer curve to the
        > feather and thus work better in the long run (IMHO)
        > snip
        > Padraig MacRaighne

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