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Bow Knobs

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  • Kinjal of Moravia
    On a different bend [;-)], I have come accross some medieval paintings of archers showing knobs on their bows (outside edge). The notes indicate the archers
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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      On a different 'bend' [;-)], I have come accross some medieval
      paintings of archers showing knobs on their bows (outside edge).
      The notes indicate the archers are proud of this 'rough'
      construction. Does anyone know why these were left on and what
      purpose they served?

      Kinjal
    • Robert Lauderdale
      My guess is that these are knots in the wood that the bowyer worked around. There was a vine maple bow at this year s war of the Lilies that had lots of
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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        My guess is that these are knots in the wood that the bowyer worked
        around. There was a vine maple bow at this year's war of the Lilies that
        had lots of counuring along the edges due to the nature of the grain

        Chidiock


        At 11:38 PM 8/4/03 +0000, you wrote:
        >On a different 'bend' [;-)], I have come accross some medieval
        >paintings of archers showing knobs on their bows (outside edge).
        >The notes indicate the archers are proud of this 'rough'
        >construction. Does anyone know why these were left on and what
        >purpose they served?
        >
        >Kinjal
      • iaenmor
        It is possible that they were working with yew. It is known to have many small knots in it and does require that you work around them. Osage has the same
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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          It is possible that they were working with yew. It is known to have many
          small knots in it and does require that you work around them. Osage has the
          same problem.
          Iaen Mor
          Gate's Edge
          Ansteorra
          Coastal Region Archery Marshal
          iaenmor@...
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Robert Lauderdale" <chidiock@...>
          To: <SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, August 04, 2003 7:15 PM
          Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Bow Knobs


          > My guess is that these are knots in the wood that the bowyer worked
          > around. There was a vine maple bow at this year's war of the Lilies that
          > had lots of counuring along the edges due to the nature of the grain
          >
          > Chidiock
          >
          >
          > At 11:38 PM 8/4/03 +0000, you wrote:
          > >On a different 'bend' [;-)], I have come accross some medieval
          > >paintings of archers showing knobs on their bows (outside edge).
          > >The notes indicate the archers are proud of this 'rough'
          > >construction. Does anyone know why these were left on and what
          > >purpose they served?
          > >
          > >Kinjal
          >
          >
          >
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        • jameswolfden
          Greetings Kinjal, I think I have seen the picture you are referring to. Or, at least, something close to it. The bows look downright lumpy. In self bows (a bow
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 4, 2003
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            Greetings Kinjal,

            I think I have seen the picture you are referring to. Or, at least,
            something close to it. The bows look downright lumpy.

            In self bows (a bow backed by itself as opposed to sinew or
            fibreglass), it is desirable to follow a single growth ring on the
            back of the bow. Violations of the back ring can cause the bow to
            fail and crack.

            As mentioned by others, knots on the back need to be worked
            around and are usually left raised. This could explain the lumpy
            or knobby appearance.

            In addition, the tree may have grown in a less than straight
            fashion. In general, these trees are avoided by most bowyers but
            there are a certain breed of bowyers who see staves from these
            trees as a challenge. Any body can make a bow from a perfect
            stave but it takes special bowyer who can make a shootable bow
            from a snaky stave. The back ring still must be followed
            regardless of what mother nature did to the tree. I am wondering
            if the bow is an artist impression of one of these snaky bows.

            James Wolfden


            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, "Kinjal of Moravia"
            <gusarimagic@r...> wrote:
            > On a different 'bend' [;-)], I have come accross some medieval
            > paintings of archers showing knobs on their bows (outside
            edge).
            > The notes indicate the archers are proud of this 'rough'
            > construction. Does anyone know why these were left on and
            what
            > purpose they served?
            >
            > Kinjal
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