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Re: [SCA-Archery] Digest Number 1237

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  • Naima
    for curious sake--why aren t compound and recurve limbs interchangeable? and for those who are offended by my off period question--DON T READ IT!! Naima =====
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 27 7:45 PM
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      for curious sake--why aren't compound and recurve
      limbs interchangeable?

      and for those who are offended by my off period
      question--DON'T READ IT!!

      Naima

      =====
      Naima bint Rashid al-Andalusiyya
      Shire of Bronzehelm
      House Dragon

      my philosophy="If you ask a question you don't want an answer to,
      expect an answer you don't want to hear"

      __________________________________________________
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    • jrosswebb1@webtv.net
      Greetings, Sometimes they are. It depends on how and for what purpose that they were manufactured.In the early days of compound bows (1970 s) at least one of
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 27 7:59 PM
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        Greetings,
        Sometimes they are. It depends on how and for what purpose that
        they were manufactured.In the early days of compound bows (1970's) at
        least one of the manufacturers did make bows that could be disassembled
        and fit with recurve limbs. Some of the early compound bows had pulleys
        and attachments that were a permanent fixture on the riser, and those
        were never meant to have anything other than compound limbs. Most
        compound bows made today are made for such short limbs that even if you
        were able to fit recurve limbs on them, because of the angle, the brace
        height would be enormous. There were early wooden riser compound bows
        that had very long compound limbs, and these had the option of using
        them as a recurve also. I can't remember the manufacturer, but I'm
        thinking that it was either Bear or Browning.
        -Geoffrei


        http://community.webtv.net/jrosswebb1/EASTWINDStribal
      • Chad and Erin Wilson
        ... From: Naima ... The limbs do not move on a compounds bow, the wheels are doing all of the work. On a recurve, the limbs are
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 27 8:06 PM
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Naima" <ladywolf89@...>
          > for curious sake--why aren't compound and recurve
          > limbs interchangeable?

          The limbs do not move on a compounds bow, the wheels are doing all of the work.
          On a recurve, the limbs are actually moving and doing the work. I have never
          seen a take-down compound bow. From what I *have* seen, the archers who use
          them are very particularly about their setup and seem to fiddle with it all of
          the time. Almost obsessively.

          -Caedmon
        • eulenhorst2000 <eulenhorst@juno.com>
          It is in the design of the attachment of the limbs to the riser. Since Compounds are not meant to be unstrung but carried fully set up they usually aren t made
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 28 2:13 AM
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            It is in the design of the attachment of the limbs to the riser.
            Since Compounds are not meant to be unstrung but carried fully set up
            they usually aren't made with the neccessary hardware to handle
            takedown limbs. That said, I have seen some lines which use the same
            riser for compound and recurve bows. In this case the can be
            switched. Be aware, however, that anytime you unstring a compound
            you must completely retune it when it is restrung -- and this can be
            quite time comsuming.

            In service to the dream,
            Carolus von Eulenhorst
            eulenhorst@...

            --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Naima <ladywolf89@y...> wrote:
            > for curious sake--why aren't compound and recurve
            > limbs interchangeable?
            >
            > and for those who are offended by my off period
            > question--DON'T READ IT!!
            >
            > Naima
            >
            > =====
            > Naima bint Rashid al-Andalusiyya
            > Shire of Bronzehelm
            > House Dragon
            >
            > my philosophy="If you ask a question you don't want an answer to,
            > expect an answer you don't want to hear"
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > Yahoo! Tax Center - forms, calculators, tips, more
            > http://taxes.yahoo.com/
          • hanhebin <hamberg@fiber.net>
            ... Hoyt makes risers that are used for compound and recurve but you cannot exchange limbs as the riser mountings are different. Recurves have a set screw
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 28 7:54 AM
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              > It is in the design of the attachment of the limbs to the riser.
              > Since Compounds are not meant to be unstrung but carried fully set
              > up they usually aren't made with the neccessary hardware to handle
              > takedown limbs. That said, I have seen some lines which use the
              > same riser for compound and recurve bows. In this case the can be
              > switched. Be aware, however, that anytime you unstring a compound
              > you must completely retune it when it is restrung -- and this can
              > be quite time comsuming.

              Hoyt makes risers that are used for compound and recurve but you
              cannot exchange limbs as the riser mountings are different. Recurves
              have a set screw where we can adjust our brace height and string
              alignment. Where you can change poundage in a compound by exchanging
              a cam and can get a wide varieties of draw weights and let up. A
              recurve you can only dial change your poundage by about 10% (by
              tweaking bowstring you can gain an additional 10%).

              I hate tuning my equipment although I do it once a month whether it
              needs it or not. Process takes a minimum of an hour and has taken as
              long as 3. Compound shooters are lucky because I have never seen a
              compound shooter take that long to tune equipment. Once a compound
              shooter get their sights set they are good to go where with an
              Olympic recurve I am having to always adjust based on different
              temperatures and lighting conditions.

              ON THE FLIP SIDE, the nice thing about shooting traditional is that
              you get to avoid setting your equipment up and all that fine tuning.
              While I spend hours figuring out the right number bowstring and arrow
              combinations works best for me the process is rather simple shooting
              a modern recurve. When I want to shoot serious I pull out my Olympic
              recurve but when I want to relax I use my longbow.

              Michael
            • hanhebin <hamberg@fiber.net>
              ... You have a good compound archery store in the town where you live so go take a look at those compounds and how those limbs attach and then take a look at
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 28 8:57 AM
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                > for curious sake--why aren't compound and recurve limbs
                > interchangeable?

                You have a good compound archery store in the town where you live so
                go take a look at those compounds and how those limbs attach and then
                take a look at the loaner bow I donated to your fair shire. Also try
                to remember my Olympic recurve and I think you will see why limbs
                aren't interchangeable.

                I wouldn't recommend trying to make a milled riser SCA legal as it is
                more hassle than it's worth as few marshals know the rules or enough
                about modern equipment. It is quite easy to teach somebody enough
                about modern equipment and how to disable or remove modern features
                to make it SCA legal BUT you still have to get around the bias many
                marshals have a aginast milled risers. What you end up dealing with
                is similar to the anti-gun people wanting to remove rifles from
                JrROTC drill teams even though those weapons have their firing pins
                removed and mechanisms made completely inoperable.

                Michael
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