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Re: Wooden Arrows , Notches,Combat Arrows

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  • Godwin fitzGilbert
    ... -snip- ... From the way you state this, I will (I know it s bad but...) assume that you use pinch nocks. I would start practicing with mercury nocks (or
    Message 1 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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      --- In SCA-Archery@y..., "Terrence Andre Payette" <shaman@s...> wrote:
      -snip-
      >
      > The is more of a 'how to' query. I've started to make my own arrows
      > but I've run into a problem with the notches. How is the notched
      > carved into the arrow shaft so it won't fall of the string?
      >

      From the way you state this, I will (I know it's bad but...) assume
      that you use pinch nocks. I would start practicing with mercury nocks
      (or quick nocks) first. That may save you some frustration with your
      self nocked arrows.
      All I use is the mercury nock, so stepping over to the self-nock is
      not an issue as far as method goes. In training myself for when I
      actually get to start shooting my self nocks, I also disregard (or
      just file off) any index tab that the nock might have, so that I rely
      on the cock feather and 'feel' to get the arrow 'on' right.

      Godwin
    • hanhebin
      ... I do something very similar here but with unpowered tools. I have found that with as much shooting as I do my hand cut nocks do break. In order to
      Message 2 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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        > I carve my nocks with parallel sides 1/8 inch wide and 3/8 deep and
        > I dont have any problems. I use a 1/8 inch ceramic cutoff wheel
        > mounted in my drill press. The stelle is inserted in a hole the
        > jig I made for this purpose which is clamped to the drill press
        > table and pushed carefully into the wheel until the slot is deep
        > enough.

        I do something very similar here but with unpowered tools. I have
        found that with as much shooting as I do my hand cut nocks do break.
        In order to strengthen my nocks here is what I do:

        1) I narrow the shaft between the nock and all the way to where the
        end of my feathers will go. Because I frequently stagger my
        fletching you may want to use a pencil to get this line correct.

        2) I get some fresh kill elk, deer or cowhide (elk is the best) and I
        cut it exceptionally thin. This takes practice and much more
        patience than I usually have. Thin means thin and I cut my hides
        thinner than garden twine.

        NOTE: I have found the best place to get hide cheap is go to a
        facility that destroyes old animals (aka Glue Factory).
        Usually you can end up enough hide for a few dozen arrows
        and pay nothing. Bring plenty of plastic bags because these
        hides will be fresh kill.

        3) I soak the hide in water. I add a little salt to make the water
        brinelike and heat the water to about 120 degrees.

        NOTE: I recommend you get a digital flue thermometer. Taylor or
        Cooper sell these for around $10 at any hardware store. You
        will need to watch the thread because too much heat for too
        long will weaken your thread.

        4) I tuck the end of the hide thread down about 1/2" down my narrowed
        shaft down where my index feather will be and I wrap over the
        thread down all the way to where my nock begins. The last quarter
        of the distance I losely wrap the hide so I can tuck the other end
        back through the wraps. Then I carefully slide my end of the hide
        thread through the wrap and tighten one loop at a time until you
        cannot see where I hid my ends.

        NOTE: I would recommend that you practice this with something
        other than animal hide because I made too many mistakes
        learning the technique. I am still slow at making hide
        thread it will save you more than a few headaches.

        5) I place the thread over my heating duck and let the air blow dry
        the wet hide. This will cause the hide to shrink and will
        reinforce the shaft.

        NOTE: This technique was used for building when metal nails were
        not available and there are plenty of old books documenting
        the technique.


        Once you get this technique down, try making a longer thread and
        wrapping your fletching with the same thread. Makes a wonderful
        looking arrow although you need to be shooting 50#+ to make the arrow
        fly right.

        Michael
      • blockflute1@aol.com
        To strengthen the nocks I cut I use a 1/16 inch ceramic cutoff wheel and cut a notch 90 degrees from the string notch (I do this before I cut the string nock)
        Message 3 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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          To strengthen the nocks I cut I use a 1/16 inch ceramic cutoff wheel and cut
          a notch 90 degrees from the string notch (I do this before I cut the string
          nock) and glue in a slice of horn (1/16 micarta) and sand it down flush with
          the surface once cured. Then I cut the string nock.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Guy Taylor
          Just in case you want to use real horn... I get mine from knife supply catalogs. Water buffalo horn already slabbed for knife handles. It s easy to cut
          Message 4 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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            Just in case you want to use real horn...
            I get mine from knife supply catalogs. Water buffalo horn already slabbed
            for knife handles. It's easy to cut slices for nock inserts.
            Here's one source:
            http://www.knifeandgun.com/catalog/water_buffalo_horn_1516448.htm

            Taillear



            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: blockflute1@... [mailto:blockflute1@...]
            > Sent: Monday, October 07, 2002 11:19 AM
            > To: SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com
            > Subject: Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: Wooden Arrows , Notches,Combat Arrows
            >
            >
            > To strengthen the nocks I cut I use a 1/16 inch ceramic cutoff
            > wheel and cut
            > a notch 90 degrees from the string notch (I do this before I cut
            > the string
            > nock) and glue in a slice of horn (1/16 micarta) and sand it down
            > flush with
            > the surface once cured. Then I cut the string nock.

            >
          • jameswolfden
            For inserts in self-nocks, I like purpleheart wood for its contrasting colour. I use a two or three hacksaws to cut the insert slot and the nock slot. I use a
            Message 5 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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              For inserts in self-nocks, I like purpleheart wood for its
              contrasting colour. I use a two or three hacksaws to cut the insert
              slot and the nock slot. I use a table saw to cut off the purpleheart
              inserts.

              James Wolfden
            • archer3@webtv.net
              To reinforce my self nocks I use linen thread tied in a temporary whipping and finished with a square knot, providing me with an index. Not as permanent as an
              Message 6 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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                To reinforce my self nocks I use linen thread tied in a temporary
                whipping and finished with a square knot, providing me with an index.
                Not as permanent as an insert, but if it comes off I only need about six
                or seven inches of thread and about 30 seconds. I position the wrap to
                where it finishes around 3/16 forward of the nock.

                Damian >>~~~>
              • hanhebin
                ... For range arrows I cheat and use Dynaflight 97 instead of animal hide. Is more durable than thread and I have enough colors that depending on how I stain
                Message 7 of 12 , Oct 7, 2002
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                  > To reinforce my self nocks I use linen thread tied in a temporary
                  > whipping and finished with a square knot, providing me with an
                  > index. Not as permanent as an insert, but if it comes off I only
                  > need about six or seven inches of thread and about 30 seconds. I
                  > position the wrap to where it finishes around 3/16 forward of the
                  > nock.

                  For range arrows I cheat and use Dynaflight 97 instead of animal
                  hide. Is more durable than thread and I have enough colors that
                  depending on how I stain my shafts I can always get the wrapping to
                  stand out.

                  Michael
                • Yama Kaminari no Date Saburou Yukiie
                  Greetings... For the Ya that I use for Makiwara and for regular free flight target practice, I have been using regular deer antler. I shape the nock and use a
                  Message 8 of 12 , Oct 8, 2002
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                    Greetings...
                    For the Ya that I use for Makiwara and for regular free flight target
                    practice, I have been using regular deer antler. I shape the nock
                    and use a drill press of slightly smaller diamater than my string,
                    then slot it with a hand saw and a jig. The knock has a tang,
                    much like an arrow head, that gets fitted into a hole drilled out in
                    the back end of the Ya (like an arrow head).
                    I reenforce the wood around the base of the nock with silk thread
                    for thirty turns. Then I lacquer the thread and let it harden. Since I
                    am using turkey feathers to fletch, I have chosen a brown thread
                    to compliment the fletching and shaft, but I suppose any color
                    would be good...
                    I have made a matched set of twenty of these Ya for both
                    makiwara and free flight, and have been happy with their results.
                    When I can afford 20 bamboo shafts I will do the same, but for
                    now, I must use what is available. I have a steel turning lathe that
                    I sometimes press into wood-working service...but you will have
                    that...

                    Yama Kaminari no Date Saburou Yukiie
                    Shi wa hei to de aru - all are equall in the grave...
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