Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

32799Re: [SCA-Archery] Re: What to do when you are always overspined?

Expand Messages
  • Catherine Townson
    Mar 5, 2013
      Thank you - this is incredibly helpful. I will work on this next time
      I can get to a range.

      I agree, this is a wonderful group of people. Thank you all.

      -Cate.

      On Tue, Mar 5, 2013 at 1:06 PM, The Greys <cogworks@...> wrote:
      > Cate,
      > You have received some very good advice here about your aiming issue. However, it strikes me that the main issue is your aiming technique. Being an archer geek (Yeah, like I'm the ONLY one on this list!?!) I have recruve, reflex/deflex, english longbows and a horse bow I shoot. Only the recurves are close to center shot bows. Having 14 bows, I also have at least 14 sets of arrows matched to the bows. However, and being lazy, I often shoot seriously over spined arrows out of some of the bows. But I still hit what I aim at.
      >
      > So here is a trick to try before you make up a new set of arrows, I use this in my beginning archery classes. With your bow hand index finger point at the target where you want to hit. With your draw hand, put it at your anchor point and lift your thumb. The top of your thumb and your index finger should be lined up. If not, you are not (or would not if actually holding a bow with an arrow drawn) be sighting down the arrow shaft. Where you point the tip is irrelevant if your eye is not aligned with the back of the shaft. You will find, as was mentioned elsewhere on this list, that the raised thumb of your draw hand does not lineup under your eye if your head is held vertically. A slight tilt towards your draw hand puts your eye just above your thumb and in line of sight.
      >
      > Of course stance and draw form also are major contributors. Start with both feet perpendicular to a line to the target, about shoulder width apart. When you draw, your body should be in alignment such that your bow arm, shoulders, through your draw arm to the elbow are all in line both vertically and horizontally. This is a good basic starting position. As you develop your shot you can experiment with open and closed stances.
      >
      > I see lots of beginning archers that do not have their arms in alignment as mentioned above. The final thing many beginning and experienced archers do is have the draw hand fly away from the face upon release. If your draw hand moves at all it should continue moving backwards so that it finishes by touching your rear shoulder. It is much like drawing through your anchor point, release just as you touch your anchor point. Personally my draw hand stays at my anchor point in what is called the dead release. When you release the string you don't actually release the string. Instead you simply stop holding it. The weight of your bow will pull the string off of your fingers.
      >
      > Good luck and practice, practice, practice. That's really how you become a better archer. But remember, productive practice is not just shooting lots of arrows or shooting Royal Rounds all afternoon. Good practice takes one aspect of the draw, anchor, release of a shot and works on just one item. After you feel you've got that worked out, move to the next item. Of course in between just shooting to have fun allows your body to "remember" some of what it learned in your structured practices. Good instinctive shooters depend upon a lot of muscle memory, how a good shot feels. But that developed feel only comes from good structured practice.
      >
      > Good luck and welcome to the BEST group of folks in the SCA!
      > kog
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In SCA-Archery@yahoogroups.com, Catherine Townson <cate.townson@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> Hello all,
      >>
      >> I tried looking through the history, but didn't see an answer to my
      >> question.
      >>
      >> From everything I've read, one should be able to aim the tip of the arrow
      >> at the centre of the target, adjusting vertically for range. In order to
      >> hit the target, I have to aim far to the left. At 20 yards maybe 2-3 feet
      >> to the left of the target. Googling my problem, it appears my arrows are
      >> very overspined. I shoot left handed.
      >>
      >> I shoot a 25# recurve bow. My draw length is 26". At approximately 2#
      >> loss per inch, it means my draw weight is effectively 21#. I use
      >> an approximately 28" shaft length. I have been unable to find wood
      >> shafts lower than a 30-35# spine, mine are currently 35-40# (this was the
      >> lowest available at the time) but I have some 30-35# shafts on the way.
      >> I'm using a fast flight string (which I believe adds 5 lbs to the
      >> suggested spine weight). I am currently using 70 gr. points, which is what
      >> I was told to use, but I have 100 and 125 gr points on hand.
      >>
      >> I'd like to get a better idea of what to do before making my new arrows. I
      >> can't be the only one with this problem. Do I just consistently aim at a
      >> point to the left and hope to upgrade to a heavier bow in a couple of
      >> years? Can I weight my points further (I see there are wood shaft point
      >> weights on the market)?
      >>
      >> Thank you for the assistance,
      >> -Cate.
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > --
      > [Email to SCA-Archery-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com to leave this list]
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
    • Show all 22 messages in this topic