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RE: [SB-r-us] Re: Strawbale Wrap

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  • pcstockfarm@yahoo.ca
    Fantastic advice Laren. As much as we love eco-friendly methods, we have found that there are certain applications to which they simply are not practical.
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 21, 2013
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      Fantastic advice Laren. As much as we love eco-friendly methods, we have found that there are certain applications to which they simply are not practical.

      Cheers,
      Darcy

      --- Original Message ---

      From: LarenCorie <larencorie@...>
      Sent: April 21, 2013 13-04-21
      To: SB-r-us@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SB-r-us] Re: Strawbale Wrap

       

      Posted by: "jill" greenbiobean@...

      > Hi, We are hoping to retrofit an existing poorly designed
      > house in one of the driest locations in Montana with shed
      > overhangs and a strawbale wrap. We are still very preliminary
      > but are seeking some critical thinking about our ideas.

      Hi Jill;

      I am a bit hesitant to recommend an alternative, on a
      strawbale list, but, it would seem that your strawbale
      solution would require a rubble trench foundation and
      grade beam. For less work and cost, you could either
      fur out your walls, or wrap them in recycled foam to
      achieve about as high Rvalue, without needing additional
      foundation, or the building of a much larger roof area.
      You also would not need to move your windows outward.

      > On the interior we would like to fill the existing 2x4
      > space with light straw of clay slip and then plaster.

      I recommend not tearing off your interior finish, and blowing
      the wall cavities with dense packed cellulose. That will get
      you a better insulation value, and reduce your labor to a
      fraction of what it would be with the straw clay. You can
      still use a natural plaster finish.

      > All of the plumbing and electrical would remain in the
      > existing stud walls.

      The pros and cons of that are similar, regardless.

      > Solar gain to the south will be considered

      Build a low-mass sunspace (sunporch) over your existing
      South wall, so that the wall will not require super-insulation
      (blow it full of cellulose). Between doing that, and doing the
      insulation/sealing upgrade you could reduce your heating
      loads to very tiny. How big is the house? Is it single
      story? What type of foundation/floor?

      -Laren Corie-
      Natural Solar Building Design and
      Solar Heating/Natural Cooling/Energy
      Efficiency Consultation Since 1975
      www.ThermalAttic.com (many new
      photos and pages, coming soon)

      Read my Solar house design articles in:
      -Energy Self-Sufficiency Newsletter-
      www.essnmag.com

      Home base-LittleHouses YahooGroup
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LittleHouses/

      Founder-WoodGas - Power from wood
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WoodGas

      Founder-RefrigeratorAlternatives YahooGroup
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RefrigeratorAlternatives
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