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Re: [SB-r-us] Re: Hi ! From Tokyo , Japan

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  • Kyle Holzhueter
    Chris, that would be an interesting experiment. Derek, thank you for the clarification regarding hydrated lime. Although not pleasant to powder between courses
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 2, 2013
      Chris, that would be an interesting experiment.
      Derek, thank you for the clarification regarding hydrated lime.
      Although not pleasant to powder between courses of bales, I think that the
      hydrated lime would be helpful, though I can't say to what extent. As a
      part of my research, I've monitored interstitial temperature and relative
      humidity of more than a dozen straw bale buildings in Japan. I've found
      that it generally takes about a year for earthen plastered bale walls to
      dry out, and more than a year for walls finished with lime. That is,
      although the plaster may look dry after a month, much of the moisture from
      the plaster is held in the bale wall for months after plastering. For a
      properly designed and built wall, this is the most moisture a wall will
      ever experience. Even if the hydrated lime only remains active for a year
      or two, it is during the most critical stage. I've seen several bale
      buildings where insects were a problem the following spring, but not seen
      after that. The hydrated lime might be helpful in these cases. (Just a
      side note, I think in one case the insects were brought in with the earth).
      Also, the alkalinity of the lime would be helpful for deterring mold, at
      least to a very small extent.


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