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Re: Larsen and other deep frame trusses

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  • LarenCorie
    Posted by: Chris Green pojeros@yahoo.com ... Hi Chris; The major codes allow 2x4s 24 oc for single story, and either 2x6s 24 oc, or 2x4s 16 oc for 2 or 3
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 25, 2012
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      Posted by: "Chris Green" pojeros@...

      > Does the 2x4 loadbearing wall ~have~ to be 16" O/C??
      > I was counting on being able to go with 24" O/C....

      Hi Chris;

      The major codes allow 2x4s 24"oc for single story,
      and either 2x6s 24"oc, or 2x4s 16"oc for 2 or 3 story.
      However, if your second wall can also be load bearing,
      I would expect that 2 2x4s would be considered at
      least equal to a 2x6. The easy way, with the building
      department, is to just build the bearing wall with 2x6s
      24"oc using advanced framing techniques. That is how
      I usually do it, for double walls, though I did a couple
      houses in non-code area using double 2x3s turned 90°
      and gusseted with OSB patches (no, I didn't call it a
      "Laren Truss" ;O) but they were too much work to
      keep consistent, so I don't recommend it.

      -Laren Corie-
      Natural Solar Building Design and
      Solar Heating/Natural Cooling/Energy
      Efficiency Consultation Since 1975
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    • Chris Green
      Thanks, Laren. Sorry for the late reply. My reason for asking is that I m thinking of building a jig to pre-make standardized trusses that can be used as if
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 15, 2012
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        Thanks, Laren. Sorry for the late reply.

        My reason for asking is that I'm thinking of building a jig to pre-make standardized trusses that can be used as if they are deep studs. (really deep! as much as 18")

        The two options are to a: make 'truss studs' that sit on the flooring like ordinary walls, or  ones that are cantilevered out and cover the rim joist on the outside. The inner studs 2x4 studs/ 'chords' (in truss language) would be the load-bearing ones. In that case, the outermost 'chord' could be 2x3s. Or even 2x2s.

        Running the truss studs around the lip of the floor, bearing directly on the rim joists and foundation, would maximize the useable floor area of any given square footage dictated by the foundation dimensions, and allow the use of around 1 cubic yd less concrete for 8' tall foundation walls. ( @ a $200+ savings right there, which helps pay for most of the 2x3s or ripped 2x6s and spacer bits. :-) )

        Cheers,

        Chris Green.



        ________________________________
        From: LarenCorie <larencorie@...>
        To: SB-r-us@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 9:26:24 AM
        Subject: [SB-r-us] Re: Larsen and other deep frame trusses


         
        Posted by: "Chris Green" pojeros@...

        > Does the 2x4 loadbearing wall ~have~ to be 16" O/C??
        > I was counting on being able to go with 24" O/C....

        Hi Chris;

        The major codes allow 2x4s 24"oc for single story,
        and either 2x6s 24"oc, or 2x4s 16"oc for 2 or 3 story.

        However, if your second wall can also be load bearing,
        I would expect that 2 2x4s would be considered at
        least equal to a 2x6. The easy way, with the building
        department, is to just build the bearing wall with 2x6s
        24"oc using advanced framing techniques. That is how
        I usually do it, for double walls, though I did a couple
        houses in non-code area using double 2x3s turned 90°
        and gusseted with OSB patches (no, I didn't call it a
        "Laren Truss" ;O) but they were too much work to
        keep consistent, so I don't recommend it.

        -Laren Corie-

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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