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Re: XPS question

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  • RT
    On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 13:22:56 -0400, Bill Steen ... Without even having a look at the link to the laboratory testing that is
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 1, 2010
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      On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 13:22:56 -0400, Bill Steen <bill@...>
      wrote:

      > I came across this product that is a layer of XPS laminated with plastic
      > on both sides that makes great claims.
      > Wondering if there could be any validity to it?
      >
      > http://www.radiantheatproducts.com/Barrier_Floor_Insulation.php

      Without even having a look at the link to the "laboratory testing" that
      is provided at the website, I'd have to
      say "What a steaming pile of horse chestnuts !"

      A whole six-sixteenths (!) [exclamation mark implied by blurb at RHP
      website] thickness of extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation would give the
      product a R-value of [ 0.375 inches x R-5 /inch = ] R-1.875.

      The polyethylene covering on the two faces of the XPS appears to be black
      rather than a shiny aluminised mylar coating as is used by some similar
      products marketed as "radiant barriers" so even if one were somehow able
      to provide a reflective airspace under the slab (the reflective airspace
      being necessary in order for the shiny surface to be effective as a
      radiant barrier and without which, renders it a thermal conductor) it
      wouldn't do much in the way of reducing radiant heat transfer. Black
      polyethylene (as appears to be what this product uses) provides an R-value
      of something like 0.000000000000000001 or so.

      I have a vague memory of a comment that was made by SB Saint Don (the
      Fungal Fun-guy) some time ago, (I think in a report that he shepherded for
      CMHC on a study of the effectiveness of products marketed as underslab
      radiant barriers) where he said something to the effect (paraphrased
      simply because of my faulty geezered memory):

      [Products marketed as underslab "radiant barriers"] are about as
      effective
      (at reducing heat transfer) as a few sheets of newspaper placed under the
      slab.

      I'd have to say that this "new" miracle product doesn't appear to change
      the accuracy of (SB)St. Don's comment.


      --
      === * ===
      Rob Tom
      Kanata, Ontario, Canada
      < A r c h i L o g i c at Y a h o o dot c a >
      manually winnow the chaff from my edress if you hit "reply"
      __________________________________________________
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    • Bill Steen
      As I assumed, but you are so eloquent and thorough in your responses I couldn t resist the opportunity to ask. Bill Steen bill@caneloproject.com
      Message 2 of 2 , Nov 1, 2010
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        As I assumed, but you are so eloquent and thorough in your responses I couldn't resist the opportunity to ask.

        Bill Steen
        bill@...
        www.caneloproject.com
        www.caneloproject.blogspot.com
        HC1 Box 324
        Elgin, AZ85611





        On Nov 1, 2010, at 11:28 AM, RT wrote:

        > On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 13:22:56 -0400, Bill Steen <bill@...>
        > wrote:
        >
        >> I came across this product that is a layer of XPS laminated with plastic
        >> on both sides that makes great claims.
        >> Wondering if there could be any validity to it?
        >>
        >> http://www.radiantheatproducts.com/Barrier_Floor_Insulation.php
        >
        > Without even having a look at the link to the "laboratory testing" that
        > is provided at the website, I'd have to
        > say "What a steaming pile of horse chestnuts !"
        >
        > A whole six-sixteenths (!) [exclamation mark implied by blurb at RHP
        > website] thickness of extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation would give the
        > product a R-value of [ 0.375 inches x R-5 /inch = ] R-1.875.
        >
        > The polyethylene covering on the two faces of the XPS appears to be black
        > rather than a shiny aluminised mylar coating as is used by some similar
        > products marketed as "radiant barriers" so even if one were somehow able
        > to provide a reflective airspace under the slab (the reflective airspace
        > being necessary in order for the shiny surface to be effective as a
        > radiant barrier and without which, renders it a thermal conductor) it
        > wouldn't do much in the way of reducing radiant heat transfer. Black
        > polyethylene (as appears to be what this product uses) provides an R-value
        > of something like 0.000000000000000001 or so.
        >
        > I have a vague memory of a comment that was made by SB Saint Don (the
        > Fungal Fun-guy) some time ago, (I think in a report that he shepherded for
        > CMHC on a study of the effectiveness of products marketed as underslab
        > radiant barriers) where he said something to the effect (paraphrased
        > simply because of my faulty geezered memory):
        >
        > [Products marketed as underslab "radiant barriers"] are about as
        > effective
        > (at reducing heat transfer) as a few sheets of newspaper placed under the
        > slab.
        >
        > I'd have to say that this "new" miracle product doesn't appear to change
        > the accuracy of (SB)St. Don's comment.
        >
        >
        > --
        > === * ===
        > Rob Tom
        > Kanata, Ontario, Canada
        > < A r c h i L o g i c at Y a h o o dot c a >
        > manually winnow the chaff from my edress if you hit "reply"
        > __________________________________________________
        > Do You Yahoo!?
        > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
        > http://mail.yahoo.com
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