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Re: [SB-r-us] Ant bed flooring

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  • LadyHiram Strawboss
    Checking in again. I m not sure of the background on this thread but if you are talking about the clay which they extrude as they excavate their mound, not
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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      Checking in again.
      I'm not sure of the background on this thread but if you are talking
      about the clay which they "extrude" as they excavate their mound, not to
      worry about displacing. It is practiclly impossible to end their colony.
      You will probably even get some coming up thru your floor if you are not
      careful. That is what I see in Africa anyway. Unbaked brick will have
      tunnels up the walls.
      strawboss

      On Fri, 01 Feb 2008 13:16:12 +1000 Andrew Webb <design@...>
      writes:
      Does anyone know of some good resources for information on ant bed
      flooring? Any thoughts on the eco-friendliness, or lack thereof, of
      displacing thousands of termites?

      Thanks,
      Andrew




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    • John Barlow
      ... There is a good book called building out termites (google for it, I borrowed it from the local library). Some of the methods (without chemicals) that I
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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        Andrew Webb wrote:
        > Does anyone know of some good resources for information on ant bed
        > flooring? Any thoughts on the eco-friendliness, or lack thereof, of
        > displacing thousands of termites?

        There is a good book called "building out termites" (google for it, I
        borrowed it from the local library).

        Some of the methods (without chemicals) that I know of are granitgard
        (GRANITGARD Non-toxic Termite Barrier - the fine stone particles that
        form a natural, long-life physical termite barrier.
        www.granitgard.com.au) and termi-mesh (stainless steel mesh
        www.termimesh.com) in Australia.

        Granitgard can be compacted (to some depth, etc.) before putting down
        flooring (which could then be recycled bricks, etc). In Australia I
        think it has to be placed and compacted by a licensed person (to ensure
        it meets the specifications ?).

        termi-mesh can be applied as a complete layer under the flooring (but I
        believe this really costs ...)

        We used a combination of 32MPA monolithic concrete raft slab (slightly
        higher strength concrete meets requirements for keeping out termites)
        combined with termi-mesh (as collars on penetrations eg: pipes through
        the slab) and 100mm (4 inch) visible slab edge (which allows you to
        monitor the building for termite access tunnels that hence become
        exposed as they cross the slab edge).

        As for displacing termites - I am happy to displace them from around and
        under the house, and keep them well away - I don't know if this is
        eco-friendly, but termites cause large amounts of expensive (and
        house-destroying) damage, so my choice is based on protecting the house.


        John Barlow
        straw-bale owner-builder
        http://www.guru.com.au/farm/
      • John Glassford
        G day Andrew We have used termite mounds for some earth renders and in Queensland. They proved very strong as one would expect. However I would not do it
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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          G ' day Andrew

          We have used termite mounds for some earth renders and in Queensland.
          They proved very strong as one would expect.

          However I would not do it again as I feel it was irresponsible to
          destroy the mounds even though no evidence of termites was present on
          the mounds we used. I doubt what we did was sustainable.

          I am using our own clay that we dig up for footings and floors as the
          main ingredient for our earthen floors and renders. I also obtain
          material from local farm dams where the cockies mound up the dams each
          year. They do not mind me taking this clay as they want to get rid of
          it anyhow.

          The Straw Wolf
          Huff 'n' Puff Constructions
          http://www.glassford.com.au/

          61 2 6927 6027

          Road MAPS to Africa & RFFA {Australia} Web Site:
          http://www.coolamonrotary.com/maps
        • Nancy or David Gray
          Hello. Well, between the missives of you and John Barlow, I am stunned with the lengths you have to go to concerning termites. This is not to say that
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 1, 2008
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            Hello. Well, between the missives of you and John Barlow, I am stunned with the lengths you have to go to concerning termites. This is not to say that termites are not a problem here in upstate California; they do make tunnels of earth up our foundations to get to the wood. But they don't make mounds and we don't have to take special precautions with our slabs to stop them. And I would suspect that no one in North America is concerned with the long term effects of their actions on termites beyond immediate extinction. Let the flaming begin. Best wishes, David Gray


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          • Andrew Webb
            Thanks strawboss, strawwolf, John and David for your quite different opinions. I don t have a particular affinity for the plight of the termite but I am
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 3, 2008
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              Thanks strawboss, strawwolf, John and David for your quite different
              opinions. I don't have a particular affinity for the plight of the
              termite but I am concerned how impacts on them will indirectly affect
              the rest of the ecosystem. The other concern is whether using their
              mounds for building construction will make them relocate, and with what
              detrimental effects? Or, as strawboss alluded, is the best bit of the
              mound virtually uninhabited, and they'll just replace it? I'm asking
              this in relation to a large project in a very remote part of Australia.
              We want to use what we can of what is available on site, for obvious
              reasons, and we want to be careful about the impact that has. Keeping
              termites out of the buildings is a concern, of course, but not my
              immediate problem when looking at the feasibility of the whole thing.
              To my mind there's no question that termite mounds are a good building
              material. But, as we do have options, is it the best one? There is a
              long way to go with this before a final decision; I'm just gathering info.

              -AW



              Nancy or David Gray wrote:
              >
              > Hello. Well, between the missives of you and John Barlow, I am stunned
              > with the lengths you have to go to concerning termites. ...
              >


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