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16527Re: [SB-r-us] Digest Number 2872

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  • Jim Carfrae
    Jun 30, 2014
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm sorry, but I'm away until Tuesday 1st July

      On 26 Jun 2014, at 09:40, SB-r-us@yahoogroups.com wrote:


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      >
      > Straw Bale Social Club Group
      >
      > 2 Messages
      > Digest #2872
      >
      >
      > 1a
      > May 2014 was hottest May on record by "Derek Stearns Roff" derekroff
      >
      > 1b
      > Re: May 2014 was hottest May on record by "Frank Tettemer" franktettemer
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      >
      >
      > Messages
      > 1a
      > May 2014 was hottest May on record
      >
      > Wed Jun�25,�2014 11:59�am (PDT) . Posted by:
      > "Derek Stearns Roff" derekroff
      >
      > Whatever you believe about causes of weather extremes, the importance of well-built, well-insulated structures, such as strawbale, is underlined almost every month. Many locations had winter weather cold that hadn�t been seen for twenty years or more. Now, as we approach summer, we have just experienced the hottest May on record (worldwide combined average, land and ocean), according to a recent report by the National Climatic Data Center, part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/sotc/global/2014/5
      >
      > While disturbing in itself, even more concerning for me is the data that four of the five warmest Mays have occurred in the last five years. In other words, every year we are seeing temperature averages that exceed everything in the first 120 years of widespread temperature record keeping. 1998 was a massively record setting year, and seemed completely off the charts, at the time. It�s record for the hottest May has now slipped to fourth place, exceeded by 2014, 2010, 2012, and closely followed by 2013. Even children of ten years old could document that Mays during the second half of their short lives have been measurably warmer than the first half. The same is true for a person of 50 or 60.
      >
      > We�ve had discussions of weather data on this list several times in the past. I�m remembering some of our then active members saying, back in 2007, that the world was actually cooling, and would continue to do so. I wish they had been right.
      >
      > Live carefully, build carefully, and consider the effects that our actions may have on the world of our grandchildren and great grandchildren. Or, if you choose to be childless, as I have, consider how the world will be for future humans, animals, and plants.
      >
      > Derelict
      >
      > Derek Roff
      > derek@...<mailto:derek@...>
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      >
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      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (2) . Top ^
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      >
      > 1b
      > Re: May 2014 was hottest May on record
      >
      > Wed Jun�25,�2014 6:44�pm (PDT) . Posted by:
      > "Frank Tettemer" franktettemer
      >
      > Well stated, Derek. Thanks for bringing that up.
      >
      > One of my OCD traits has been to watch the weather, for the past fifty
      > years.
      > We've had a lot of trends to consider and observe.
      >
      > In the early seventies, solar heating was a daily possibility, all
      > Winter long, after the cloudy period of November and December, during
      > freeze-up. After freeze-up, all the moisture was "frozen" out of the
      > air; it was clear, non-cloudy, and cold.
      >
      > In 1995, I had observed a change in the amount of Winter sunlight in
      > Ontario Canada. I started telling inquiring minds to put their interest
      > in wind power and less in solar power. I was predicting then, that the
      > weather was becoming more and more unsettled, (windy), and less and less
      > clear and sunny.
      > Through the sixties , seventies, and eighties the trend was towards more
      > and more cloud cover, through January into March. This had
      > traditioonally been very cold and clear and sunny, with temps rising to
      > -15 C in daylight, and -20c to -30C at night.
      >
      > It was easy to get most all our home electricity from photo voltaic
      > panels all Winter, after freeze-up, when the air turned crisp, clear and
      > cold.
      >
      > These current days it is very different. These days, it is mostly cloudy
      > all Winter, and cloudy even in the Summer, here in the previously crisp
      > and crystal-clear North Country.
      > These days, we get over fifty percent of our household electrical supply
      > from our 13' diameter wind turbine, and less and less from our 1800 watt
      > photovoltaic array.
      >
      > /"Put your money in Wind, sonny-boy. But make sure that there tall tower
      > is built stronger than you'd think"/.
      > That's my "sage" advice of 2014.
      >
      > --
      > Frank Tettemer
      > Living Sol ~ Building and Design
      > www.livingsol.com
      > 613 756 3884
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (2) . Top ^
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > VISIT YOUR GROUP New Members 1

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