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FW: [books.shovelbums.org] Richard Stockton "Scotty" MacNeish Apr il 29, 1918 to January 16, 20001

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: Christopher P. Koch [mailto:ckoch@mindspring.com] Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2001 1:41 PM To: Popplestone, Ann; DIBBLE, Loretta Subject: Fwd:
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 22, 2001
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      FW: [books.shovelbums.org] Richard Stockton "Scotty" MacNeish April 29, 1918 to January 16, 20001

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Christopher P. Koch [mailto:ckoch@...]
      Sent: Sunday, January 21, 2001 1:41 PM
      To: Popplestone, Ann; DIBBLE, Loretta
      Subject: Fwd: [books.shovelbums.org] Richard Stockton "Scotty" MacNeish
      April 29, 1918 to January 16, 20001


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      >Date: Sun, 21 Jan 2001 01:08:03 -0500
      >Subject: [books.shovelbums.org] Richard Stockton "Scotty" MacNeish
      >April 29, 1918 to January 16, 20001
      >
      >Please pass this announcement onto any relevant mailing lists you might be
      >on as Scotty's friends are interested in getting the word out to the rest of
      >his old buddies.
      >
      >On Tuesday of this week Dr. Richard Stockton "Scotty" MacNeish died in a
      >hospital in Belize City from complications resulting from an auto accident.
      >Scotty had been on a working vacation driving between the sites of Lamanai
      >and Caracol.  Driving fast, as was his typical pace, the car lost control on
      >some loose gravel and crashed.  Fortunately British troops were nearby and
      >were able to get Scotty and his traveling companion, long time friend and
      >editor Jane Libby, removed from the wreckage and off to the hospital.  Jane
      >tells me that the driver happened to be an archaeologist and that Scotty
      >talked shop with him all the way to the hospital.  Sadly, four hours later,
      >Scotty passed away due to complications from the accident.  Jane is
      >recovering in a hospital in Miami, Florida.
      >
      >Everyone I have talked to so far has agreed, with the exception of actually
      >being able to die on an archaeology site, this is the way Scotty would have
      >wanted it: Away in the rainforest, between visiting two great sites, talking
      >shop, and reflecting on the cold Belikin beers he had the night before.
      >About the only thing different about this I could imagine is that he would
      >have preferred a bit more sporty of a car than a rental.
      >
      >Scotty's body will be cremated in Belize and flown to his home in Andover
      >Massachusetts.
      >
      >A bit about Scotty.
      >
      >Scotty, as one friend put it best, was a hell of a character.  I have even
      >had the pleasure to have worked with Scotty's original crew boss, Roger
      >Willis, who supervised Scotty during the WPA days at the Kincaid site in
      >Illinois when Scotty was a young buck at Chicago.  Even then Roger tells me,
      >Scotty was quite the character having been a golden gloves champion in his
      >youth, and heavily into listening to the blues on the south side of Chicago.
      >But what most of us remember Scotty for is his pioneering work on the
      >origins of corn in Mexico in the 1950's.  There is however plenty of
      >information about Scotty on the web for which I have added a few links
      >below. So I would just like to say a few words myself.
      >
      >The bottom line about Scotty was he was a good man.  He was known as many
      >things: a story teller, an agitator, a flirt, a lover of good bourbon and
      >Bohemia beer, a man who had the most important trait a archaeologists can
      >hope for, passion for his profession.  It does not matter if you agree with
      >all of his interpretations of his research - disagreement is the nature of
      >our profession.  What matters is that Scotty was a good person.  And yes you
      >will hear your bosses and professors tell stories about Scotty - some wilder
      >and harder to believe than others, but unless they are first hand stories -
      >and so few of them are it seems, take them with a grain of salt.  I am sure
      >though that Scotty regrets not having got to meet each of you personally -
      >as that was one of his true loves was, meeting younger archaeologists and
      >telling them stories about the old days.  I was never at a conference where
      >Scotty and I crossed paths that he did not make the time to take the groups
      >I was with to the bar to regale them with first hand stories of field work
      >throughout the century.  At the age of 82, and after nearly 6,000 days in
      >the field - Scotty has become part of what he had always loved, the
      >archaeological record.
      >
      >So folks, the only thing I ask of you all is the next time you are in the
      >bar with your archaeology buddies or taking lunch in the field, have a
      >moment of silence among yourselves - reflect on the fact that this man who
      >was born in 1918 and who died in 2001... was still doing archaeology, then
      >make a toast to his memory.  Scotty would have liked that.
      >
      >
      >There a few photos of Scotty at the new Shovelbum's section called "The
      >Ossuary".  If you have any personal anecdotes that you would like to share
      >on this page feel free to pass them on to me.
      >
      >http://ossuary.shovelbums.org/
      >
      >I found several good articles about Scotty online at:
      >
      >By Bill Brown -
      >
      >http://www.discoveringarchaeology.com/0599toc/5profile1-macneish.shtml
      >
      >and
      >
      >http://emuseum.mnsu.edu/information/biography/klmno/macneish_richard.html
      >(text below)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >From -
      >http://emuseum.mnsu.edu/information/biography/klmno/macneish_richard.html
      >
      >Richard Stockton MacNeish
      >
      >
      >1918 -
      >
      >As Director of the Robert S. Peabody Foundation for Archaeology in Andover,
      >Massachusetts, Dr. MacNeish has contributed to the art of gathering and
      >printing archaeological information. He was and is known as Scotty by his
      >colleagues and friends. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago
      >in 1949.
      >According to Dr. MacNeish, in his forty year career as an archaeologist, he
      >has spent 5,683 days digging in the field. The most well renowned of his
      >numerous books and 170 plus articles are his five volumes of writings on the
      >findings in the Valley of Mexico. These findings were on the prehistory of
      >the Tehuacan Valley in south-central Mexico. Many archaeological awards and
      >medals have been bestowed upon Dr. MacNeish, no doubt as a result of his
      >dedication to the field.
      >He was the recipient of the Kidder Award. This award meant a great deal to
      >MacNeish for he and Mr. Kidder were close personnel friends before Kidder
      >passed away. He also received the Verrill and Drexel Medals from
      >Pennsylvania and Yale Universities, respectively. He received the
      >Cornplanter and Spinden Medals and in 1974, McMaster University selected him
      >to be the Whidden Lecturer.
      >Along with his many fine works in both anthropology and archaeology, he also
      >was quite a boxer in his younger years in New York. Richard Stockton
      >MacNeish was the Golden Glove Boxing Champion of Binghamton in 1938. He will
      >continue to help and teach the people of today with the dedication he fought
      >so earnestly for throughout his entire life.
      >MacNeish was a New World archaeologist whose primary focus was the
      >transition from hunting/gathering subsistence base to sedentary, agriculture
      >based culture in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico. MacNeish found that the
      >primary agricultural species in the Tehuacan Valley was corn which had been
      >domesticated before 3000 B.C.
      >
      >References:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >1918 -
      >
      >
      >
      >As Director of the Robert S. Peabody Foundation for Archaeology in Andover,
      >Massachusetts, Dr. MacNeish has contributed to the art of gathering and
      >printing archaeological information. He was and is known as Scotty by his
      >colleagues and friends. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago
      >in 1949.
      >
      >According to Dr. MacNeish, in his forty year career as an archaeologist, he
      >has spent 5,683 days digging in the field. The most well renowned of his
      >numerous books and 170 plus articles are his five volumes of writings on the
      >findings in the Valley of Mexico. These findings were on the prehistory of
      >the Tehuacan Valley in south-central Mexico. Many archaeological awards and
      >medals have been bestowed upon Dr. MacNeish, no doubt as a result of his
      >dedication to the field.
      >
      >He was the recipient of the Kidder Award. This award meant a great deal to
      >MacNeish for he and Mr. Kidder were close personnel friends before Kidder
      >passed away. He also received the Verrill and Drexel Medals from
      >Pennsylvania and Yale Universities, respectively. He received the
      >Cornplanter and Spinden Medals and in 1974, McMaster University selected him
      >to be the Whidden Lecturer.
      >
      >Along with his many fine works in both anthropology and archaeology, he also
      >was quite a boxer in his younger years in New York. Richard Stockton
      >MacNeish was the Golden Glove Boxing Champion of Binghamton in 1938. He will
      >continue to help and teach the people of today with the dedication he fought
      >so earnestly for throughout his entire life.
      >
      >MacNeish was a New World archaeologist whose primary focus was the
      >transition from hunting/gathering subsistence base to sedentary, agriculture
      >based culture in the Tehuacan Valley of Mexico. MacNeish found that the
      >primary agricultural species in the Tehuacan Valley was corn which had been
      >domesticated before 3000 B.C.
      >
      >References:
      >
      >  -----------------------------------
      >R. Joe Brandon
      >rjoe_brandon@...
      >538 Bridgeford Dr.
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      >614-847-1202
      >  -----------------------------------
      >
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