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RE: [SACC-L] Job Searches

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  • Gilliland, Mary
    I think Advisors play a role as well in sending students to Psychology. Somehow at my college people think psychology is practical (maybe even vaguely in
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 18, 2013
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      I think Advisors play a role as well in sending students to Psychology. Somehow at my college people think psychology is "practical" (maybe even vaguely in the realm of "science") and sociology is definitely not practical (or employable). Anthropology is way out there... not on the advising radar! (as a general statement -- maybe less so at Pima, see below)

      We are lucky enough to live in an area where Archaeology is front and center, so we actually have a well-developed Anthro program, with 3 full-time faculty at my campus alone, and at least one full-time at all our other campuses (we are a multi-campus college, with 6 locations). We have an Archaeology Center, and do contract archaeology as part of our training (less now, but in the past actually brought considerable funding into the college, so that got us noticed).

      One strategy that helped for me when I was a new faculty member was to look at the gen ed requirements, and especially special requirements (e.g. non-western civ, global awareness, cultural diversity requirements that had to be built into certain classes and approved by the Curriculum council for that purpose in a student's educational program), and I developed courses that hit those targets. We have one class that I developed in a pique of annoyance when anthro didn't count for any non-western civ, so it has a stupid name, "Exploring Non-Western Cultures" so the powers that be couldn't ignore it. Later, when we got new special designations, I applied for all of them, including making the class "intensive writing" (lots of work for the teacher, but hey, we do write a lot anyway, and so it works). As a result we can't offer enough of these classes.

      I have never taught anything but anthropology, and specifically Cultural Anthropology and Linguistics, while other specialized faculty teach the Physical Anthropology and Archaeology sections.

      But it did take some market awareness and some persistence and even a little pushiness on the part of the anthro folks to get ourselves noticed. We also also collectively got ourselves appointed to important committees and became department chairs so that we could encourage people to take anthro as support courses for education, nursing and other more "employable" areas. Talking to colleagues in these other areas, and helping them understand how useful anthropology is as a support area for cross-cultural and global understanding can also help boost enrollments (and in our case, it got us additional hires).

      I do understand that things are much more difficult now and there are fewer f/t positions. I agree that the certificate in Psych, if available, might be the way to go. We also offer many more Psych sections than Sociology, and generally they are better regarded by the college because of our own popular culture about what that is and what it means.

      Mary Kay Gilliland
      Pima Community College
      Tucson, AZ
      mkgilliland@...


      -----Original Message-----
      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Sydney Hart
      Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 2:51 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Job Searches

      Lloyd:

      I think there are two main reasons for the popularity of psychology for our students. 1. it's a job title--one that they've heard of and they think they know what psychologists do. Schools, for example, have school psychologists so many students know of a psychologist even if they've never talked to one. 2. We live in an individualistic society and psychology focuses on the individual.

      I think you also make some good points, but at least where I work, psychology is a rigorous class.

      Sydney


      Sydney Hart, Ph.D.

      Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Sociology

      Wilbur Wright College

      4300 North Narragansett Avenue

      Chicago, Illinois 60634

      ________________________________
      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Lloyd Miller [lloyd.miller@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, June 18, 2013 3:20 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Job Searches



      I would add this in support of Dianne's and Sydney's comments: at DMACC we have always had two to three times the psychology faculty as any of the other social sciences, including sociology, and this includes both full-time contracted and adjuncts. In fact, in the entire Arts and Sciences division, psychology enrollments were second in size only to English composition classes.

      I suppose people would rather learn more about themselves (as they believe psychology teaches them) than learn about the "Pukapukans," and so psych's popularity entices the vocational and career ed. curriculum planners to include a psych course in their otherwise tightly controlled technical programs. Also, psych casts a wide umbrella that includes "human relations" and "sex and gender" courses, always popular electives. And, my personal favorite: anthropology and (maybe less so) sociology take critical and comparative looks at society. How many people really want to learn about societies that may have solved some problems better than we have? Thomas Szasz notwithstanding, much of psychology seems to offer "feel good" information and advice.

      So, how many psychologists does it take to screw in a light bulb? (Answer: only one, but the bulb must WANT to change!) Eewww... sorry!

      Lloyd

      On Jun 17, 2013, at 4:34 PM, Sydney Hart wrote:

      > I have to support Dianne's point. I've just stepped down from being department co-chair and I can tell you the one category of adjuncts that we always needed were Psych folks. At Wright College, we have 1 full time Soc person, 1 full time Anthro person, and me (I split my time between the two disciplines); we have 3 full time Psych people and just put in to hire one more (hopefully they'll honor our search). We also have 3 Soc adjuncts, 1 Anthro adjunct, and 7 or 8 Psych adjuncts and we're adding to the Psych pool.
      >
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      > Sydney
      >
      >
      >
      > Sydney Hart, Ph.D.
      >
      > Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Sociology
      >
      > Wilbur Wright College
      >
      > 4300 North Narragansett Avenue
      >
      > Chicago, Illinois 60634
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] on behalf of Dianne C [dianneky@...<mailto:dianneky%40hotmail.com>]
      > Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 4:12 PM
      > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Subject: [SACC-L] Job Searches
      >
      >
      >
      > Nikki (and others),
      > I just thought of this and don't know if it is of interest.
      > I think if I were going to do it over, I might get the extra grad hours in psychology instead of sociology. We never have enough psychologists--full-time nor adjunct.
      > Just a thought...
      > Dianne
      >
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      >





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